MONASTICON
ANGLICANUM,
OR, THE
HISTORY
Of the Ancient
Abbies, and other Monasteries,
Hospitals, Cathedral and Collegiate Churches,
IN
ENGLAND and WALES.
WITH DIVERS
French, Irish, and Scotch Monasteries
Formerly relating to
ENGLAND.

Collected, and Published in Latin, by Sir William Dugdale, Knt., late Garter King of Arms.

In Three Volumes.

And now Epitomized in English, Page by Page.

With Sculptures of the several Religious Habits.

Forfan & haec olim meminisse juvabit,
Virg. AEn. I.

LICENSED,
May the 5th, 1692. R. MIDGLEY.

LONDON:

Printed, for Sam Keble at the Turks Head in Fleet Streat;
Hen Rhodes at the star the Corner of Bride lane in Fleet Street, MDCXCIII.

To the much Honoured

WILLIAM BROMLEY, Esq;

One of the Knights of the Shire for the County of WARWICK.

THAT which I here present you is Originally the Product of your own Country, since the Great Artist from whose elaborate and curious hand I Coppy this Peice in little, owed his Birth and Habitation to Warwickshire. I know not therefore to whom (in the number of my Friends) more properly to dedicate these Collections than to your self: for thus it is an act of Justice to restore to the proper County (in your Person who represent it) what came from thence at first.

Nothing deterr'd my Presumption in this more than to think I should expose the Imperfections of my Pen to so accurate and excellent a Judgment. A Judgment that has taught you the true use of Foreign Travails, by which you have brought home from the politest Nations of Europe, all their Virtues and Accomplishments, and left behind their Fopperies and Vice. It is this Judgment that has so signalized your Merit in the Eye of your Country, that she has justly fixt her choice on you for one of her Representatives in our Great Senate; and it is the same Judgment that you have since most worthily employ'd in that High and Honourable Assembly, by assisting, and complying with the best Methods and Endeavours for the Publick Good: Or, to use the words of Horace,

Quid expediat, communiter, aut melior pars,
Malis carere quaeritis laboribus.

Yours are the Publick Cares; that's your noble Province. While I, and those in my inferiour and unactive Station, can only wish Success to the Proceedings of such Good Patriots as your self; Our thoughts are best employ'd with our own private Business, and inoffensive Studies.

The Epistle Dedicatory.

Concerning this Book, Sir, it is a Subject that gives Posterity such a View of the decays of Time, and the Inconstancy of Fortune, as the like cannot, perhaps, be produced in the History of any other Nation. Since of all that stupendious number of Monastick Foundations in England and Wales, the continued Work of many Ages, by which the greatest Kings, Princes, and Noblemen of this Island were once thought to have eternized their names, and in those magnificent and costly Structures to have built themselves so many Monunments as lasting as the Earth they stood on, not one remains at this day; nay the very Ruines of many are become invisible. To this purpose (tho' on a different occasion) a modern French Poet hath well exprest himself in these Lines,

Aussi le temps a fait fur ces Masses hautaines
D'dustres chastimens des Vatitez humaines.
Ces Tombaux sont tombez, and ces superbes Rois
Sous leur chute sont morts une seconde fois.

And yet their Memory still lives in our History and Records; so much more durable and lasting is Paper than Brass and Marble. For this we are beholding to the Labours of your Sir William Dugdale, a Person so highly meritorious in the study, and discovery, of our English Antiquities, that his Reputation can never die among the learned.

Warwickshire has certainly produced two of the most famous and deserving Writers, in their several ways, that England can boast of; a Dugdale, and a Shakespear, both Williams; a name that has been of eminent Grace to this County in many Instances: nor will it ever cease to be so while you are living.

I might here enlarge in your just Encomium, but I fear to displease you even with truth, when it must be so very much to your Commendation. I know your Modesty as well as Merits, and I have ever observed that Praise is most uneasie to those who best deserve it. I will therefore only add that I am,

SIR,
Your very Humble and most Affectionate Servant,
J.W.

TO THE READER.

Something may be said here, By way of Preface, of the Work it self, and of this abridgment or Epitome of that Work. First for the Work it self, it will perhaps be thought by some that the Monasticon Anglicanum, or History of the Foundations and Endowments of the ancient Abbies, Priories, etc., once flourishing in England, and long since utterly supprest, is in these our days (in which their very Memory seems to some People, odious and ungrateful) more useless and insignificant than an Old Almanack. 'Tis true, the matter appears very obsolete and neglected, yet is the Monasticon Anglicanum so far from being useless, that it is in effect the most useful Evidenciary, and Repertory of Titles that is in print. Considering, 1. The Vast Quantity of Lands which formerly belonged to Religious Houses in this Kingdome, 2. The divers sorts of Liberties and Immunities which most of those Houses and their Possessions were endow'd with, as Courts of Pleas, Markets, Fairs, Commons, Free Pastures, Estovers, Exemptions from Tithes, Tolls, Taxes and Contributions, with other Franchises of various sorts and not easily reckon'd up. 3. That by the Statutes 27H.8.ch.28.§.1. etc., 31H.8.ch.13.§.2.3, it is expressly provided that the King and his Patentees shall have and hold the said Lands in as large and ample manner as the said Houses enjoy'd them, and §.21. of the last mentioned Statute, that such Lands as were before discharged of the Payment of Tithes shall so continue. By which Provisions such Persons as enjoy any

To the Reader.

of those Lands are Intituled to many of the same Liberties and Franchises as were at first given with the said Lands to those Houses respectively, such Franchises being real and annext to the Estate. 4. All the Monasticon is a Transcript of antient manuscripts coppyed by that laborious Antiquary Mr. Roger Dodsworth, and that eminently learn'd Historian Sr, William Dugdale Knt. late Garter King of Armes, out of the Very Original Grants, or Leiger Books, or Publick Records, or other Muniments formerly kept by the respective Monasteries, and (when they perused them) choicely preserved either in some of our most famous Libraries, or in the Possession of those Gentlemen and Persons of honour, who since the Suppression enjoy the Lands to which those Deeds relate, or some part of them; whose names are cited in the Margin of the said Book. And such credit hath it received from the integrity of the Authors or Collectors thereof, that (as I am credibly inform'd) it hath been admitted as a good Circumstantial Evidence in the Courts of Westminster when the records therein transcribed could not upon diligent Search be otherwise recovered. Further, this Book is of use to enlighten and assist the young Student of our Common Laws, it shewing in divers parts of it, the Commencements of Tenures, the Nature and manner of Corrodies, Appropriations, Endowment of Vicarages, Reservation of Services upon Grants in Frankalmoine, or Upon Tenures by Divine Service, the old Ways of tithing, Conveyancing, and something of Pleading. It is also useful in History, giving us a lively Idea of the manner of our Forefathers way of Living, their Zeal for Gods Publick Worship, as then profest, and the Simplicity of their Devotions; and of the great Charity to the Poor, and Hospitality and Beneficence to all Comers, maintain'd and exercised in the Monasteries. But these things have been thought faults, and therefore I will mention no more of that; but observe in the last place, that this Book is of great use in matters of Heraldry and Genealogies; there being few or none among the Great Families, and old Nobility, of England, who have not been Founders or Principal Benefactors to some Monastery or Religious House, and the Monks and Canons have for the most part taken special Care to record in the Leiger Book of their respective Houses

To the Reader.

the History of their Founder's and Patron's Family, setting down their several Matches, and Issue, and often- times the day of their births and Deaths, with the most remarkable Circumstances of their Lives, and where buried; which seems also to be done at the time when every thing happen'd or soon after, and is therefore of greater Credit. In this Work we must note that the Author saies nothing of the four Orders of Fryers, viz., The Franciscans or Gray-Friers, the Dominicans or Black Friers, the Carmelites or White Friers, and the Augustine Friers; the Reason was, I suppose, because their Houses, generally speaking, were not endow'd with Lands and Revenues, but they subsisted for the most part by daily and accidental Charities.

Thus much of the Book at large, now as to this Abridgment or Epitome, I have only this to say; It gives you a short view in English of the Principal, and (as I thought), most material Passages of what is contain'd in Latin, and sometimes old French, in the three great and copious Tomes of the Monasticon Anglicanum: The names of Persons and Places, being variously written according to the different Orthography of several Ages, and Writers, I have not thought convenient to alter the ancient way of spelling, but have transcribed them herein the same variety as I found 'em there: In the margin I have exactly observed and mark'd out the Pages successively in order, that so the Reader may have a ready recourse to the Book at large for a fuller and more particular Information. And in my opinion this is the best use that can be made of any Abridgement; namely to serve as a larger and better sort of Table, which not only represents the substance of a voluminous Author in little, but refers and directs the Reader to the place where the Subjects is more expresly handled. On the whole, you have here a short Historical Account of the Foundation of all the principal Churches and Religious Structures in England and Wales, as well those that were demolisht at the Suppression of the Monasteries, as those that are still in being (except Parish Churches). And here we must note that of all those Cathedral Churches and Episcopal seats, whose Venerable Fabricks we behold at this day, some were formerly Abbies, where the Prior and Convent of Monks were the Bishops Chapter;

To the Reader.

such were Canterbury, Rochester, Winchester, Ely, Norwich, Worcester, Durham, Carlile; (and such Churches where there was a Bishop, the Superior of the Monks was always call'd a Prior, the Bishop being in effect the Abbot) others never were Abbies, but the Chapter did always consist of a Dean and Secular Canons (or Prebendaries) as at present; such were York, London, Lincoln, Salisbury, Exeter, Wells, Litchfield, Hereford, Chichester, and in Wales, St. Davids, Landaff, Bangor, and St. Asaph. Besides these, there were five new Bishopricks erected by King Henry VIII. in certain Abbies, after their dissolution, viz. Peterborough, Oxford, Chester, Glocester, and Bristol, whose Churches were left standing, with some of their old Buildings for the Habitation of the Bishop, Dean and Chapter, etc. (for which see the Statutes, 31. H. 8. ch. 9, 34. H. 8. ch. 17). Westminster-Abby was also made an Episcopal Seat, but that continued so but a while. Some other Monastick Churches were made Parochial, and are still in being, as St. Albans, St. Mary Overies, Royston, etc. To conclude, I think I may, not unfitly, apply to my present undertaking the words used on the like occasion, in the Second Book of Maccabees, ch.2.v.23. All these things (I say) being declared by Jason of Cyrene in five Books, we will essay to abridge in one Volum. For considering the infinite number, and the difficulty which they find that desire to look into the Narrations of the Story, for the variety of the Matter, we have been careful that they that will read might have delight, and they that are desirous to commit to memory might have ease, and that all into whose hands it comes might have profit - To stand upon every point, and to go over things at large, and to be curious in particulars, belongeth to the first Author of the Story. But to use Brevity, and avoid much labouring of the Work, is to be granted to him that will make an Abridgment. Here then will we begin the Story: only adding thus much to that which hath been said, that it is a foolish thing to make a long Prologue and to be short in the Story it self.

MONASTICON
ANGLICANUM,
ABRIDGED.

VOL I.

OF THE
Benedictine Monks,

CLUNIACS,
CISTERSIANS, and
CARTHUSIANS.

Of the first Institution of Monks.

THose who have writ of this Subject have produced for Examples of the Monastick Life, out of the Old Testament, Samuel, Elias, and the Sons of the Prophets; and out of the New, St. John the Baptist, and our Saviour Christ himself, who exhorted his Disciples to leave all Secular concerns and follow him. After his Ascention the Apostles and Disciples lived in common; But after the Apostles were martyr'd, some Christians retained Property; others still endeavour'd to continue the Apostolick Life, and live in Common: such were the Monks in Egypt; Anthony, Hilarion, Macarius, etc. After them St. Jerome, St. Augustin, till at last St. Benedict in the year 516. at Mount-Cassin, writ his Rule, which was approved by the whole Church.

Of the Rules of Monks, and other Religious Persons there have been several Authors, some of the Principle were, St. Basil, who writ his Rule for Monks, Anno Dom. 350. St. Augustin Bishop of Hippo made a Rule for Canons Regular, Anno Dom. 400. St. Benedict, before mention'd, about Anno 516. St. Bruno, for Carthusians, Anno 1083. Robert an Abbot in Burgundy instituted the Cistercians, Anno 1098. Norbert^, the Premonstratenses Anno 1120. In the same year began also the Hospitallers and Templers. St. Gilbert of Sempringham founded his Order, Anno 1148. St. Dominick, Anno 1198. St. Francis 1260. The Carmelites were settled and establisht by Pope Martin, Anno Dom. 1279.

Kings of this Land who have become Monks.

Petroc, King of Wales; Constantine, King of Cornwall; Sebby, Offa, and Sigebert, Kings of the East-Saxons; Ethelred, and Kynred, Kings of Mercia; Coelwulph, and Edbricht, Kings of Northumberland.

The Old Form of admitting a Brother into a Convent.

His first Petition, in the Colloquium.

Syr I besyche you and alle the Covent for the luffe of God, our Lady sanct Marye, sanct John of Baptiste, and all the hoyle Cownte of Devyne, that ye wolde resave me, to lyve and dye here among yow in the state of a Monke, as prebendarye and servant unto alle, to the honour of God solace to the Company, proufet to the place, and helth unto my Sawle.

His Answer unto the Examinacyon.

Syr I tryste thrugh the helpe of God and your good prayers to keep all thes things which ye have now heyr rehersede.

His Petition before the Profession.

Syr I have beyn heyr now this twell month nere hand, and lovyde be God, me lyks right well, both the order and the company; wherapon I besyche yow and all the company for the luffe of God, our Lady sanct Marye, sanct John of Baptiste and all the hoyle company of hevyne that ye will resave me unto my profession at my twell month day according to my petycion whyche I made when I was fyrst resaved heyr amongs you etc.

Of the Benedictine Order have been four Emperors, twelve Empresses, six and forty Kings, one and fifty Queens, not to mention those of lesser Quality.

VOL. I.

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM,
Abridg'd in English.

Vol. I.

Of the Benedictine Order.

The Monastery at GLASTONBURY, in Somersetshire.

IN the 31th. year after our Saviour's Passion, twelve Disciples of St. Philip the Apostle, among whom Joseph of Arimathea was one, came to this place, and preacht the Christian Religion to King Arviragus. They obtained of that King the Ground where the Monastery afterwards stood, and twelve Hides of Land, and built there the first Church of the Kingdom, in a poor and homely manner. They lived here in a kind of heremitical life, and converted many Pagans to the Faith of Christ. After they were all dead, and here buried, the holy men Phaganus and Diruvianus, having baptized King Lucius, obtained this place of that King, and for a great while they and their Successors remained here in a kind of Society consisting of twelve only, till the arrival of St. Patrick, who taught them the monastical Life, and became himself their first Abbot. Afterwards St. David Archbishop of Menevia (now called St. David's) added to the East end of the Old Church a lesser Chappel in manner of a Chancel, and consecrated it in honour of the Virgin Mary.

This Church for its Antiquity was by the old English call'd Ealdechirche, and the Men of those days had no Oath more sacred and formidable than to swear by this Old church. And it was reverenced like Rome it self, for as that became Famous for its multitude of Martyrs, so did this for its multitude of Confessors here buried.

The Isle in which this Church stood was by the Britions call'd Ynswyrtryn, i.e., the Isle of Glass, from the clear and cristaline stream of Water which runs into the Marsh here. It has been also called Avallonia. By the Saxons it was named Glastynbury. This Isle with several other places adjoyning, were call'd the twelve Hides, and did enjoy from the beginning very great Priviledges. The Bounds of which twelve Hides may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p.2,3. These places there mentioned enjoyed all sorts of Immunities from the first beginning of Christianty in this Land, confirm'd to the Church of Glastonbury, by the British, English, and Norman Kings.

In this Church did rest and lie buried the twelve Disciples of the Apostle Philip, above mentioned, whose chief was Joseph of Arimathea, with

2 BENEDICTINES. Vol. I.

his Son Josephus. Here also lies St. Patrick the Apostle of Ireland, and two of his Disciples, St. Gildas the British Historaographer, St. David Archbishop of Menevia, St. Dunstan Archbishop, St. Indractus with his seven Companions all Martyrs, St. Urbanus, the Bones of Venerable Bede, with the Relicks of a great number of other Saints, and holy Martyrs, and Confessors.

To recite all the Reliques that were in this Church would be too large for any Abridgement, I only mention those of most note. Several things relating to the Old Testament, as Moses's Rod, Manna, etc., things relating to out Lord Jesus Christ, two small pieces of his Cradle, some of the Gold which the Wise-men of the East offered, some pieces of Bread of those five Loaves with which Jesus fed five thousand men, some of our Lord's Hair, some pieces of his Cross, and of his Sepulchre, one Thorn of his Crown of Thorns, etc. Things relating to the Virgin Mary, some of her Milk, one thread of her Garment, and some of her Hair, etc. Besides these a multitude of Reliques relating to St. John Baptist, the Apostles, Martyrs, Confessors, and Virgins. On this account the Church of Glastonbury was highly reverenced by Kings, Queens, Archbishops, Bishops, Dukes, and the Nobility of both Sexes, and of all Orders and Degrees; and happy did he think himself who could give any thing to the increase of its Possessions, or could here obtain a place of Sepulture. In this Isle, which was call'd the Tomb of Saints, was interr'd Coel King of the Britons, Father of St. Helena, Mother of Constantine the Great; Caraducus Duke of Cornwall, the renowned King Arthur and Guenevera his Queen, which King died at Glastonbury about Whitsuntide in the Year of our Lord 542. King Kentwynus, King Edmund Son of Edward the Elder, King Edgar, King Edmund Ironside, with several Bishops and Dukes who were great Benefactors to this House, and many other Great men. In so great Reverence was the Church and Church-yard where these were interr'd, that our forefathers did not dare to use any idle discourse or to spit therein, without great necessity, enemies and naughty men were not suffer'd to be buried therein, neither did any bring any Hawk, Dog, or Horse upon the Ground, for if they did, it was observed that they immediately died thereupon.

Bishops and famous Prelates that have gone from this House to govern other Churches, are as follows, viz. Birthwaldus, Abbot here, was made Archbishop of Canterbury; Athelmus Monk here, Bishop of Wells, and after that Archbishop of Canterbury; St. Dunstan, Monk and Abbot here, Bishop of Worcester, then of London, and lastly of Canterbury; Egelganus Monk here, Bishop of Chichester and Archbishop of Canterbury; Sigericus Monk here, Bishop of Wells and Archbishop of Canterbury; St. Elphegus a Martyr, Bishop of Winchester, and after that Archbishop of Canterbury; Elnothus, Monk here and Archbishop of Canterbury, in the time of King Knute.

To these may be added Gaufridus a Bishop, and Monk here, ob. Anno Dom. 782. Ethelwinus, a Bishop, who died the same year; Wibertus, a Bishop, ob. Anno Dom. 800. Wigthagu Bishop, ob. Anno Dom. 836. Alstanus, Bishop, ob. Anno Dom. 842. Tumbertus, Bishop, ob. 836. Daniel, Bishop, ob. 956. Elfricus, Bishop, ob. 988. Also in the time of King Edgar, Sigegarus Bishop of Wells, Britelmus Bishop of Wells, Alfwoldus, Sigefridus, St. Ethilwoldus, Wilfinus, Aelfstanus, Egelricus, Kenwaldus, Elmerus, Livingus, Brithwius, Britwaldus, who died Anno Dom 1045. All these, of Monks in this House became Bishops of divers places in England.

The Benefactors to this House were, first, Arviragus King of the Britains, who, though a Pagan, gave to St. Joseph and his Companions the

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 3

Isle in which the Monastery was built, call'd by the inhabitants Ynswyrtryn, which, King Lucius did afterwards confirm to Phaganus and Diruvianus, and their Disciples. King Arthur gave many other adjoining lands. King Kenwalli, King kentwinus, King Baldredus, Bishop Hedda, King Kedwalla, King Ina, gave other Lands. So did St Wilfridus Archbishop of York, and abundance of others of both Sexes, among the Principal of which were King Sigebert, King Offa, King Alfred or Alured, King Atheltan, King Edmund, King Edwin, King Edgar, King Edmund Ironside, with several Queens. These and many other names, with the Lands by the several Benefactors given, may be read of in the Monasticon at large p.9, 10, 14.15, etc.

St. Patrick, who was born in the year of our Lord 361. after his Conversion of Ireland to Christianity, became Abbot of this Place, and obtained of Pope Celestine, twelve years Indulgence to all those who should with pious Devotion visit the Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary here erected, and honour her with any part of their Goods.

About the year of our Lord 505. Augustine the Monk was senr into England by the holy Pope Gregory to preach the Faith to the English Saxons. He converted Ethelbert the King of Kent and his People. Afterwards being made Archbishop, he establisht his Metropolitan Seat at Canterbury, and there placed certain Monks living according to the Rule of St Benedict; after this several Monasteries in England were erected under the same Rule, which obtained so great reputation that there were no Monks to be found in England but what were of this Order; and in those times the Rule of St Benedict began to be first observed in the Monastery of Glastonbury, they living here before that, after the manner of the Monks of Egypt.

King Ina began his Reign over the West Saxons Anno 689. and gave much Land to this Monastery, he also built the greater Church at Glastonbury, in honour of our Saviour, and of the holy Apostles Peter and Paul. And by his Charter bearing date Anno Dom. 725. Granted to this Monastery many and great Priviledges and Immunities. King Ina dying in a Pilgrimage to Rome, his Successor, Ethelardus, became also a bountiful Benefactor, as were several other succceding Kings of the West Saxons, etc.

King Edmund granted to the Church of the holy Mother of God at Glastonbury, and to the venerable Dunstan Abbot there, the Liberty and Power, Rights and Customs, and all Forfeitures in all their Lands, i.e., Burgbrice Hundred Socna, Athas, Ordelas, Infangenethcofas, Homfecna, Frithbrice, Forfleall, Toll and Team, through the Kingdom of England, and that they should enjoy their Lands as free from all Claims as he enjoy'd his own, especially to the Town of Glastonbury it self, with many other Liberties etc., and this was by his Charter dated Anno Dom. 944.

King Edgar, by his Charter dated at London Anno Dom. 971. granted to the said Monastery the same and greater Liberties, among other things, that the said Monastery and some Parishes there mentioned subject and belonging to it, should be exempt from the ordinary Jurisdiction of the Bishop, except in some things, with a Salvo to the holy Church of Rome, and that of Canterbury: And gave and confirmed to this Church two hundred and fifteen Hides of I and given by several Benefactors.

William the Conqueror at his first coming to the Crown, did very much mutilate the Possessions of this Church. He made one Turftinus a Norman Abbot here, in the year 1081. And in order to make some amends to the monks, he confirm'd to them several Lands which they complained to have been unjustly taken from them.

4 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

Herlewin, and Henry Brother of Theobald Earl of Blois, and Nephew of King Henry the I. were two Abbots of this Monastery, who through their industrious endeavours obtained much good to this House, and the Restoration of many Lands which had been taken from it.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 837.

[This Abby was valued before the Suppression at 3311 l. 7s. 4d. ob. Per Annum.]

The Cathedral Church of Canterbury.

IN the time of the blessed Gregory's Papacy, St. Augustine with several other Monks were sent to convert the English People, who in the year of Grace 600. (or according to others 596.) coming into England, converted King Ethelbert and some thousands of his People, which King gave them a Mansion in his Capital City of Canterbury, then called Dorobernia, there to Preach and Baptize. Hereupon the blessed Augustine having received a Pall from Pope Gregory, built a Church there, and dedicated it to the honour of our Saviour Jesus Christ, he also did here institute the Metropolitan Seat of himself and Successors. And having rais'd here a Monastery of Monks, the People flow'd in to him from all parts, some for Baptism, and some to become Monks, devoting themlelves and all they had to God's service.

The Principal Benefactors were King Ethelbert, who gave them his Palace in Canterbury, which Pope Gregory decreed to be the Metropolitan Seat, and made it the first in Dignity, it having first received the Faith, Ethelbaldus Son of Ethelbert. King Cedwalla, King Offa, Edmundus King of Kent, Cenulphus King of Kent, Beornulphus King of Mercia, King Athelstan, King Edmund, St. Edward the Confessor, William the Conqueror, King Henry the I. Henry the II. Richard the I. Edward the III. Edward Prince of Wales, his Son; Henry the IV. These and abundance of others of inferiour condition gave and confirmed to this Church many Lands, Priviledges, and Immunities, the particulars of all which Lands, etc., may be seen in the Monasticon at large.

The Monastery of St. AUGUSTINES in Canterbury.

Saint Augustine being sent by Pope Gregory as aforesaid, arrived at the Isle of Thanet in Kent, in the year 596. with several Monks and Ministers of God's Word about forty in number; they were kindly received by King Ethelbert, who received holy Baptism on Whitsunday Anno Dom. 597. After this Augustine went over to the Bishop of Arles in France, and being by him ordain'd a Bishop, he returned into England. At Canterbury he fixt his Metropolitan Seat as above-mentioned. A little without this City on the East-tide had been an Idol Temple formerly made use of by Ethelbert, before his Conversion, this Augustine chang'd into a Church; and dedicated in the name of St. Pancrace the Martyr. Afterwards in the year 605. Augustine obtain'd this Church, and the adjacent Ground of King Ethelbert, upon which place a new Church was built and dedicated to the honour of St. Peter and St. Paul; which Church was stored with Monks, endow'd with Revenues by that King, and appointed for the

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 5

burial place, of himself and Successors, as also chosen for the burial of Augustine and his Successors, Archbishops of Canterbury.

King Ethelbert having built and endow'd this Monastery he placed there, by the Council of Archbishop Augustine, one Peter a Monk to be Abbot of it.

The Archbishop Augustine granted several Priviledges to this Monastery, and denounced heavy Censures against any who should violate the same in future times.

This Monastery was used for a burial place of the Archbishops, the Monks, and others of Canterbury, for many years; it being in those times not usual to bury within a City, till the Venerable Cuthbert came to be Archbishop, being the 11th. after Augustine, who being at Rome, obtain'd of the Pope the liberty of having burial places in England, within Cities.

On the East side of Canterbury without the City and near this Monastery stood the Church of St. Martin, which Church was the Seat of a Bishop, who always remain'd at home, or in the County, and in the absence of the Archbishop used to act for him. The last Bishop of this Church was one Godwyn, who dying in the time of William the Conqueror, when Lanfrank was Archbishop of Canterbury, he refused to subrogate any other Bishop in his place, but instead of a Bishop constituted an Archdeacon there.

[Valued before the Suppression at 1413 l. 4s. l1d. ob.q. per Annum.]

ROCHESTER, in Kent.

Anno Dom. 600. King Ethelbert founded the Church of St Andrew the Apostle at Rochester, and gave to it several Lands, as did also Eadbert King of Kent, Offa King of Mercia, and divers others; denouncing to the Violators of their pious Donations, heavy Curses and Imprecations. All which Lands and Liberties King Henry the I. did confirm to the said Church, to Gundulf the Bishop there, and the Monks serving God in it. Other principal Benefactors to this Church, and the Monks here, were King William the Conqueror, King William Rufus, Rodbert Son of King Henry. Robert Fitz Hamon, and William de Albeiney the King's Butler.

[Valued before the Suppression at 486 l. 11s. 5d. per Annum.]

WINCHESTER Cathedral Church.

Anno Dom. 608. Kinegilfus Son of Celric, King of the West Saxons, after his Baptism and his peoples conversion to Christianty, designed to build this Church, and to it give all the Land lying about Winchester for the space of seven Leucas or Miles. But himself being prevented by death from perfecting what he intended, his Son and Successor Kinwalcus perform'd the Work, and confirm'd the Lands above-mentioned to the said Church.

Other principal Benefactors to this Church were King Ina, Ethelardus, King of West Saxons; Egbert, King of all Engand, who lies buried here, King Alured, who built a new Monastery within the Coemitery of the

6 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

Episcopal Church, endow'd it with Possessions, and gave the Government of it to St. Grimbuldus. (This King first instituted Hundreds and Tithings); Edward his Son and Successor, King Ethelstan his Son, King Edred his Brother; King Edgar; Queen Emma Mother of Hardecanute, and Edward fornamed the Confessor; which Queen having perform'd her purgation of supposed incontinency with Elwin Bishop of Winchester, according to the Law Ordel, by going over nine red hot Plowshares, unhurt, gave to the Church of St. Swithin, here, nine Manors; so also did the said Bishop Elwin; all which gifts were confirm'd by King Edward the Confessor.

Anno Dom. 1079. Bishop Walkelinus began to new build the Church from the Foundation, towards which Work the King gave so much Wood, as could be cut down and carried away from his adjoyning Wood called Hanepinges, in three days and nights, upon which, such an innumerable Company of Carpenters assembled, that in the time limitted, they conveyed away the whole Wood.

Anno Dom. 963. In the time of Bishop Ethelwold, the secular Clergy of this Church, living licentiously, were displaced, and Monks put in their room. Vide infra, p. 979.

[Valued at 1507 l. 17s. 2d. per Annum.]

DURHAM Monastery.

Anno Dom. 635. Eighty-eight years from the first coming of the English into Britain, and thirty nine years from the coming of St. Augustine, pious King Oswald erected a Bishops Seat in the Island of Landisfarn, of which Agdanus became Bishop, and placed there the Monks that came along with him.

Of this See, Cuthbert was Consecrated Bishop, at York, on Easter-day Anno Dom. 685. To him Egfrid King of Northumberland gave Creec, with the Lands three Miles about it, and also Lugubalia, now called Carlile, with the Lands fifteen Miles about it. Ob. Cuthbert 687.

Anno Dom. 729. Coelwolf King, of Northumberland began his Reign; he was a great Benefactor to this Church, and became himself a Monk here.

All the Land lying between the two Rivers of Tyne and Tefe, was formerly given to St. Cuthbert, and was subject to the Government of the Bishop of St. Cuthberts Church, till the Danes took away a great part of the Lands, which were however restored again by King Ethelstan.

In the year 1074. Aldwinus a Monk and two of his Companions led a Monastick Life at a place then called Girecum or Girne in Northumberland, from which three Monks, three Monasteries proceeded, namely one at Durham, in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary, and of St. Cuthbert, one at Lestingham, and one at a place then called Streneshalgh, all three within the Kingdom of the Northumbers.

William de Karilepho by his Deed dated Anno Dom 1082. declared the many and great Liberties granted by Pope Gregory the VII. and adds others to the Church of St. Cuthbert, with an Anathema to the Impugnors.

King William the Conqueror upon the precept of Pope Gregory the VII. and at the Petition of William Bishop of Durham, removed the Secular Canons out of the Church of Durham, and placed Monks in their room, and confirmed all the Liberties and Priviledges granted to the said Church, and this by his Charter dated in the 18th. year of his Reign.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 7

Thomas Archbishop of York set forth and declared the Diocess of the Bishop of Durham to be all the Land between Tyne and Tefe, Northumberland, Tevydale, Tyndal, Carleol, Weredale, with the Church of Hertesham, and Lindisfarn.

Principal Benefactors to this Church were, King William the Conqueror, who gave great Posessions to the Bishop and his Successors, to hold all as free and quiet as he himself held them in his own hands.

Edgar Son of Malcolm King of the Scots, he gave to the Church of Durham, the Mansion of Berwic, and Coldynghamschyr.

King Richard the I. he granted and confirm'd to the Bishop of Durham and his Successors many great Priviledges, with the Dominion and Liberty of a Count Palatin, for ever, etc. Vid. Vol 2. p. 845.

[Valued at 1366 l. 10s. 9d. per Annum.]

MALMESBURY, in Wiltshire.

MAyldulphus, by Nation a Scotchman, a Philosopher by Erudition, and a Monk by Profession, was the first Founder of the Monastery here.

Anno Dom. 635. King Berthwald, with the Consent and Confirmation of King Ethelred, gave to this Monastery for ever Summerford, lying upon the River Thames.

Other Benefactors to this Monastery were Lutherius Bishop of Winchester, who by his deed dated Anno Dom. 680. gave to it for ever the Town of Malmesbury, King Athelred in the year 681. gave other Lands; so did King Chedwalla Anno 682. in the year 1065. King Edward the Confessor confirm'd all former Donations, and himself granted to this House great Liberties and Priviledges; the like did King William the Conqueror in the year 1081 the same year Mauld his Queen became also a Benefactrice.

Pope Innocent in the year 1248. granted to the Abbot and Monks of Malmesbury in the Diocess of Salisbury, a Confirmation of all their Lands and Revenues, which see in the Monasticon at large, together with several great Immunities; and ordain'd that the Rule of St. Benedict should be for ever observed in this Monastery.

[Valued at 803 l, 17s. 7d. ob.q. per Annum.]

WESTMINSTER ABBY, in Middlesex.

IN the days of King Lucius the first Christian King of Britain, who was baptized Ann Dom. 184. this place was first consecrated to God's honour, and especially appointed for the Royal Sepulture and a Repository of the Regalia. Thus it remained till, under Diocletians persecution, Christianity was expelled from hence, and the place turned to a profane Temple of Apollo. Afterwards when the Saxons had conquered this Kingdom and were in possession of it, the blessed Gregory in the year of Grace 604. sent Augustine the Monk together with Mellitus, Justus, Laurentius, and others, to teach the Christian Religion in Britain. He arrived in Kent, as hath been already noted, and having converted and baptized Ethelbert, King of that province, he afterward did the same to Sebert, King of the East Saxons, King Ethelbert's Sister's Son; who upon his Conversion

8 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

to Christianity, cast down the foresaid Temple of Apollo, and in the same place (then called Thorney Isle) built a Church in honour of St. Peter Prince of the Apostles.

In the same year the blessed Augustine, ordained two Bishops Mellitus Bishop of London, and Justus Bishop of Rochester. The History of this Church says, that Mellitus going to consecrate it, he found the Work already performed by St. Peter himself.

This Church being afterwards new built by St. Edward the King and Confessor, Pope Nicholas granted to it large immunities, appointing it to be for ever a Seat of Benedictine Monks, the place of Consecration of our Kings, and Repository of the Regalia, and exempted it from the Bishops Jurisdiction, placing it under the sole and immediate Government of the King and his Successors.

The said King Edward theConfessor, by his Charter dated in the year 1066. reciting that at the Dedication of this new Church he had placed here certain Relicks, viz. Two pieces of our Lord's Cross, a piece of his Seamless Coat with other Relicks of the blessed Virgin, and of the Apostles, etc. he renew'd and confirm'd the Lands and Priviledges formerly granted to this Church by his Ancestors, granting others of his own and giving to the praise of Almighty God, and for a perpetual Endowment to this Church, several Lands and Hereditaments, among others Roteland after the death of Queen Edgith, etc. With blessings denounced to those who shall in the future increase or improve these Gifts, but heavy Curses and Anathemas against those of what degree or quality soever who shall infringe or diminish the same. Vid. Vol. 22. p. 847.

[Valued at 3471 l. 0s. 2d. q. per Annum.]

SHERBURN, in Dorsetshire.

Founders and Benefactors to this Monastery were Kenewale, Edgar, Offa, Egbert, Sigebert, Ina, and several other Saxon Kings. In the year of our Lord 1122. Sherburn and Horton made both but one Abby; but afterwards about the year 1139. Roger Bishop of Salisbury changed the Priory of Sherburn into an Abby, that of Horton being destroy'd and annext to this. See more of this Abby infra, p. 423.

[Valued at 682 l. 14s, 7d. ob. per Annum.]

LESTINGHAM, in Yorkshire.

Anno Dom. 648. Edilwald son of Oswald King of the Northumbers, gave to Cedde Bishop of the East Saxons (or Bishop of London) a piece of Ground on a high Mountain, called Lestingay, for the building of a Monastery. For the erecting of which Cedde prepared himself by fasting a whole Lent (except Sundays) eating nothing till the Evening, and then only a little Bread, one Hen-Egg, and a little Milk mingled with Water. After this he built the Monastery, and instituted there the same Discipline as was used in that of Lindisfarn, where he himself had been educated. He govern'd his Diocess for many years after, but died in this Monastery, and was here buried.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 9

PETERBOROUGH Abby, in Northamptonshire.

THIS Monastery was begun by Peada the first Christian King of Mercia, by and with the allistance of a great and eminent man called Saxulphus the first Abbot here. The place where it was built was in those old Times called Medeshamstede, but the Church being dedicated to St. Peter, it was afterwards called Peterborough. The Foundation was perfected and the Endowment compleated by Wulfer King of Mercia, and younger Brother of King Peada, who after his conversion to Christianity by his Deed Anno Do. 664. not only confirmed what had been already given by his Predecessors, but gave to this Monastery a very great quantity or Lands lying in the Country round about. King Edgar by his Charter dated A.D. 972. granted other Lands and many Priviledges. Pope Agatha granted many Priviledges to this Monastery, which were confirmed in a Council of twenty five Bishops, assembled in a place called Estfeild, A.D. 680. These Grants, Liberties and Priviledges, were in succeeding times confirm'd by King Edward the Elder, King Ethelred, King Cnut, Edward the Confessor, and William the Conqueror.

The Monastery of St. Peter at Medeshamstede, being built A.D. 654. remained in Peace till the year 870. at which time the Pagan Danes coming down out of Yorkshire into Lincolnshire, Earl Algar, Morcar, a Lay Brother of Crowland-Abby, called Tolius (who had been a famous Souldier before he entered into Religion) Hardingus of Reihalle, and under his Command all the men of Stamford, made head against them, and at first conquered the Pagans; but they being soon after reinforced with greater power, they in a second Battel over threw the Christians with grievous slaughter; burnt down the Abby and Church of Croyland, and from thence marcht to Medeshamsted where they slew the Abbot and all the Monks to the number of eighty four, and utterly destroyed the Church and all other Buildings. From hence they march'd to Cambridge destroying all the Country as they went.

In the year of Christ 970. St. Adelwold Bishop of Winchester began to re-edifie the Monastery of Medeshamstede, and call'd it the Borough of St. Peter, one hundred years after it was destroyed by the Danes.

The foregoing Particulars of this History have been curiously painted in the Windows of the Cloysters belonging to this Abby, with English Verses under each Picture explaining the Story; Which see in the Monastcon at large.

[Valued at 1721 l. 14s. 0d. ob. q. per Annum.]

WHITBY, (of Old call'd STRENSHALE), in Yorkshire.

Anno Dom. 655. Penda the Pagan King of Mercia making War upon Oswy King of Northumberland, Oswy made a Vow to Almighty God that if he overcame his Enemies, he would dedicate his Daughter to perpetual Virginity, and give twelve of his Manour-houses to be converted into Monasteries. Hereupon he fought, and tho much inferiour in number obtain'd a Signal Victory, and Penda was slain in the Battle. In performance of his Vow, he gave his Daughter named Ethelfleda, then scarce one year old to be a Nun, and the Ground then called Streneshal for the building of a

10 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

Monastery. It was begun by Hilda, a Woman of great Religion; and was at first a Nunnery, but afterwards a House of Monks.

In the year 1067. William de Percy, who came into England with the Conquerour, and had obtained to himself and Heirs the Town of Whitby and all its Members, made a new Foundation of the Abby of Whitby, and gave all the said Town and Members to God, St. Peter, and St. Hilda of Whitby, and to the Monks there serving God, in perpetual Alms, with divers other Lands; and made Reinfridus a Mook of Evesham, Prior of the Monastery. This was after this place had been destroyed by the Danes above two hundred years.

Many were the Benefactors to this Abby, besides the Founder William de Percy, a particular of the Lands, Possessions, Forests, Churches, Tithes, and Liberties by them given, may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 74, 75. Vid. inf. p. 988.

[Valued at 437 l. 2s. 9d. per Annum.]

CHERTSEY, in Surrey.

THE Abby of Chertsey was founded in the Reign of King Egbert, in the year of our Lord 666. by Frithwaldus a petty King or Governor of the Province of Surrey, under Wulfar King of Mercia, and endow'd with large Possessions; all which were confirm'd by the said Wulfar King of Mercia.

The Limits of the Lands belonging to Chertsey-Abby may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 77.

Pope Alexander granted to this Abby many Priviledges; among other, that they should pay no Tithes of their Lands in their own hands, nor of the Beasts which they themselves kept.

[Valued at 659 l. 15s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

BERKING, in the County of Essex.

THE Nunnery at Berking, eight miles from London, was founded by Erkenwaldus Bishop of that City, for his Sister Ethelburge, who was the first Abbess of this Nunnery.

Hodelredus a Kinsman of Sebby King of the East Saxons gave to this House fair Revenues, which Guift was confirm'd by the said King Sebby.

The Ancient Profits and Expences of this Nunnery, as they were charg'd to the Account of the Celeress, may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 80, 81, 82, 83.

[Valued at 862 l. 12s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

The Monastery of St. Mildred, in the Isle of Thanet, in Kent.

Mildred the Virgin, was the Daughter of Merwaldus Son of Penda King of Mercia, and Domneva of the Family of the Kings of Kent. Which Domneva with her Husband's assistance built this Monastery for Nuns, and placed here seventy Virgins, of whom their Daughter Mildred was consecrated Abbess. This House was destroy'd by the Pagan Danes in

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 11

the year 1011. Afterwards in the time of King Cnut, it was annext by that King's Grant to St. Augustines Monastery, and the Body of St. Mildred translated from hence to St. Augustines at Canterbury, A.D. 1033. The Lands belonging hereunto in the Isle of Thanet, were confirm'd to the said Monastery of St. Augustines by King Edward the Confessor.

FALKSTONE, in Kent.

EAswida Daughter of Eadbaldus Son of Ethelbert King of Kent, built this Monastery in a remote Part from Commerce, situated seven Acers breadth from the Sea, which in process of time quite wore away the Land, and destroyed this House, but the Reliques of the holy Virgin the Foundress, who lived and died here, were removed to the Neighbouring Church of St. Peter.

See more of this House, ifra, p. 560.

[Valued at 41 l. 15s. 10d. per Annum.]

LIMING, in Kent.

THE Monastery here was built by Ethelburge Daughter of King Ethelbert, and Wife of Edwin King of Northumberland, after whose death she return'd into Kent, and founded this Nunnery, and lies here buried.

RACULFE, in Kent.

BIrthwald Archbishop of Canterbury was before his election to that See, in the year 692. Abbot of Raculfe.

In the year 949. King Eadred King of all England, gave the Monastery of Raculfe and all the Lands belonging thereunto, to the Church of Canterbury, Odo being then Archbishop and Metropolitan there. The Lands belonging to this House did amount to twenty five Carucates, and one Carucate assigned only to the Repairs of the Church.

ELY Abby, in Cambridgeshire.

ANno Dom. 637. The blessed Augustine, built a Church at Ely in a place called Cradindene, a mile distant from the present City, it was consecrated to the honour of the blessed Virgin, and stored with Ministers for God's service, but these were all expell'd by Penda King of Mercia, and the place turn'd into a Desert.

Afterwards in the year 673. Ethelreda the Virgin, built a Monastery in a more eminent place in Ely, for both Sexes, of which she her self became the first Abbess. In the year 870. the Church of Ely was again destroy'd and burnt by the Pagans.

In the year 970. Ethelwaldus Bishop of Winchester bought this Isle of King Edgar, rebuilt the Church and placed Monks in it, under the Rule of an Abbot; and in this state it remained till the year 1108. (9 H. I.) at which time Pope Paschal at the request of that King, changed the Abby into a Bishoprick.

12 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

The foresaid Ethelred was Daughter of Anna King of the East-Amels, and was buried in Ely together with several other holy Women of her Relations and Blood.

The History of this Church says, that an Apparition appear'd to one of the Monks, and foretold to him the destruction of the Monastery, because not one of both Sexesin this House, but himself, did use to pass the night in religious Exercises, but in Vanity and Sin. After which the Daves destroyed it to the Ground, Anno Dom. 870.

Benefactors to this House were the abovesaid Ethelwald Bishop of Winchester who bought the whole Isle of Ely, and gave it and other Lands and rich Moveables to this Church, King Edgar and King Edward the Elder, granted and confirmed to it many Lands and Priviledges, approved and ratified by Pope Victor.

[Valued at 1084 l. 6s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

WIRMOUTH, and GYRWY, now called YARROW, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

IN the year 674. Egfrid King of the Northumbers gave a quantity of Ground lying at the mouth of the River Wyra, to the holy Abbot Benedict an Englishman, who had been five times at Rome, for the building a Monastery to St. Peter, and other Lands in a place then called Gyrwy, not far distant for another Monastery to the honour of St. Paul. Both which he indow'd, and filled with Monks.

Gyrwy, is four miles distant from New-Castle, of this House Venerable Bede, was heretofore a Monk, and educated under the above-mentioned Benedict.

[Valued at 25 l. 8s. 4d. per Annum.]

ABBINGTON, in Barkshire.

AT such time as the wicked Hengist destroyed 460 of the Barons and Great men of this Land, by fraud and treachery, one of the Noblemen's Sons named Aben made a shift to escape the slaughter, and concealed himself in a Wood on the South-side of Oxfordshire for a great while, but being at last taken notice of for his great sanctity, people built there for him a House and Chappel, which was afterwards from his name called Abendun. In the year 675. one Heane, a man of great Riches begun to build in the same place a Monastery (though after removed to some distance)and gave to it a part of his Inheritance. Sister of this Heane was Ciffa, who built at a place called Helmston near the Thames a Monastery for Nuns, of which she became herself the Abbess. This Lady had obtained a small piece of one of the Nails of our Lord's passion, to which she caused some other Iron to be added, and made of that, a Cross, which she caused to be placed upon her breast after her death and so buried. This Cross was in the time of Adelwold Abbot here (and afterwards Bishop of Winchester) found accidentally, in digging to make an Aqueduct, it was translated into the Monastery of Monks, and there preserved with great reverence; and call'd the black Cross.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 13

The Monks here at their first Institution were but twelve and the Abbot; they never went abroad without great necessity and with the Abbot's leave; they did eat no flesh, unless sick, etc.

The Town of Abington was in old time called Seuekesham. It was a Regal Seat, and a place of great concourse for religious Worship, as well before the times of Christianity, as since, (tam tempore Religonis funaticae, quam tempore religionis Christianae, are the Words of the old Historian).

Benefactors to this House were Cewalla King of the West- Saxons; King Ina his Son Anno Dom. 699. Kenulfus King of Mercia, Anno Dom. 821. Edred King of all England, Anno Dom. 955. Edgar King of all England Anno Dom. 958. in the Reign of this King, the above-mentioned Adelwold was Abbot here, who built the Church in honour of the holy Mother of God, and sent one of his Monks beyond the Seas for the rule of St. Benedict, he settled here several good Orders, and gave great Riches and Ornaments to this Church; after this, he was by King Edgar chosen to be Bishop of Winchester, Anno Dom. 963. King Hen. I. was also a great Benefactor. And Pope Eugenius III. granted to this Abby great Priviledges by his Bull dated, Anno Dom. 1146.

[Valued at 1876 l. 10s. 9d. per Annum.]

GLOUCESTER Abby.

ANno Dom. 680 or 681. In the Reign of King AEthelred, one Osrich a petty King, or Subregulus, first founded the Church of St. Peters in Gloucester, and placed his Sister Kineburga, Abbess of the Monastery there. This Monastery was built at the Expences of King Ethelred and his Wife Elfleda. Which being afterwards destroyed by the Danes, was in the year 1058. restored and consecrated by Aldredus then bishop of Worcester, and afterward Archbishop of York.

The aforesaid King Ethelred, in the the 30th. year of his Reign became a Monk at Bardeney, and after that Abbot; and departed this life in the year 716.

The fore-mentioned Ofrich, became King of the Northumbers after the death of Kenred, and died, Anno Dom. 729.

The Nuns of this House were dispersed after the year 767. and Benedictine Monks were placed here, Anno Dom. 1022. by Wolstan then Bishop of Worcester.

This Church was again new built from the Foundation by Serlo the first Abbot after the Conquest, and consecrated in the year 1100. by Sampson Bithop of Worcester. Two years after which this Church together with the whole City of Gloucester was burnt down.

Many were the Benefactors to this Church of all sorts and qualities, whose Names together with the Lands given, amounting in all to a great Revenue, may be seen at large in the Monasticon, from p. 111, to p. 120.

See more of this Church infra p. 993, and Vol. 3. p. 7.

[Valued at 1946 l. 5s. 9d. per Annum.]

14 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

WORCESTER Abby.

ANno Dom. 680. In the Reign of King Athelred in the Kingdom of Mercia, Worcester was first made a Bishops seat; and Bofelus the first Bishop.

St. Oswald who was Bishop here in the year 871. or according to others 959. introduced the first Monks, into this Church, in the room of the Clerks.

King Offa, King Edgar, and many others of the Saxons; were great Benefactors to this Church, as may be seen in the Monasticon, from p. 121, to p. 136. and from thence to p. 140. a Recapitulation of their Lands and Endowments.

[Valued at the Suppression at 1229 l. 12s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

BARDENEY Abby, in Lincolnshire.

WHEN the Body of St. Oswald was first buried at Bardeney, there were three hundred Monks in this Abby. It was first built by King Ethelred, and destroyed to the Ground by the Danes, and re-edified again by Gilbert de Gaunt Uncle to William the Conqueror; whose Son and Heir Walter de Gaunt did, in the year 1115, confirm to the Church and Monastery of St. Peter and St. Paul, and St. Oswald, at Bardeney, all those Lands and Possessions which his Father had given in pure and perpetual Alms to the same: And did also inlarge their Possessions of his own Charity. All which was afterwards confirm'd by King Henry the first. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 847.

[Valued at 566 l. 6s. 1d. per Annum.]

EVESHAM Abby, in Worcestershire.

Saint Egwin, who was the third Bishop of Worcester founded this Monastery. Kenredus King of Mercia, and Offa Governour of the East Angles in the year 709, being both then at Rome, endow'd it with large Possessions. The Towns which St. Egwin obtain'd to his Monastery of the said Kings were in all twenty two. There were belonging to this House sixty seven Monks, five Nuns, three poor People, three Clerks, who had all the same allowance as the Monks had; and besides these, sixty five Servants. The under Officers of this House as Prior, Sub-Prior, third Prior, Precentor, Sacristan, Celarer, etc. were created by the Abbot with the advice and consent of the major part of the Covent, in Chapter. All which Officers had their several Rents arising from distinct and several places appropriated to their several Offices.

In the year 1174. Waldermarus King of Danemark gave and confirm'd the Priory of Othenesia in that Kingdom as a Cell to this Abby of Evesham.

This Abby was first founded, as aforesaid, by St. Egwin in the year of grace 691. and dedicated to the honour of the glorious Virgin Mary. The Founder himself leaving his Bishoprick, became the first Abbot here. After whose death succeeded eighteen Abbots until the year 941. at which time the Monks here were dispersed, and secular Chanons substituted in

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 15

their room. In the time of King Edgar, Anno Dom. 660, the Monks were again restored; but after his death expell'd again, in the year 977. This House and Estate was afterwards given to a potent man called Godwin, and successively it came into several hands, till at last in the year 1014. King Ethlred made Ailfwardus a Monk of Ramsey, Abbot of Evesham; he was also Bishop of London at the same time. From his time the Abby of Evesham flourisht under divers Abbots, whose names from the Norman Conquest till the year 1379. are as follows, Egelwinus, Walterus, Robertus, Mauricius, Reginaldus, Willielmtus de Andivilla, Rogerus, Adam, Rogerus Norreys, Radulphus, Thomas de Marleberg, Ricardus le Cras, Thomas de Glovernia, Henricus, Willielmus de Wytechurch, Johannes de Brokehampton, Willielmus de Chyriton, Willielmus de Boys, Johannes de Ombresleye, Rogerus Zatten 1379. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 851.

[Valued at 1183 l. 12s. 9d. per Annum.]

SHEPEY Monastery of Nuns, in Kent.

FOunded by Queen Sexburga, about the year of our Lord 710. William Archbishop of Canterbury, after the Conquest restored this Monastery, it having lain a long time burnt down and destroyed by the Danes. King Henry the II. King Richard the I. King Henry the III. and others, were Benefactors to this Church of St. Sexburg here, and to the Nuns serving God in the same; all whose Donations of Lands and Liberties were confirm'd in the 1st. year of King Henry the IV.

[Valued at 129 l. 7s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

SELSEY, in Sussex.

IN the year of our Lord 711. Wilfred Bishop of Hagulstad remaining five years in the Isle of Selsey to avoid persecution, built there a Monastery in honour of the blessed Mary, to which Ethelwold King of the South Saxons, gave Lands.

TUKESBURY, in Gloucestershire.

THIS Monastery was founded in the year 715. by two Dukes of great account in the Kingdom of Mercia named Oddo and Doddo, to the honour of the glorious Virgin Mary.

Robert Fiz-Hamon in the year 1102. new built this Church and Monastery, making it an Abby, and subjecting to it the Priory of Cranburne. His Daughter Mabilla was afterwards married to Robert base son of King Henry I. who was created Earl of Gloucester; he built the Priory of St. James at Bristol, and annext it also to this House. From him descended Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, who was a great Benefactor to this House, and buried here; as were the rest of his descendants, Earls of Gloucester, and the Dispencers who descended from one of the Heirs General. All these and more of their Blood, among whom Henry de Beauchamp Duke of Warwick, were Benefactors to this Abby, their pious gifts being all confirm'd and ratified by the King, 1462.

16 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

The several parcells of Lands and Hereditaments given and confirm'd to this House by former Kings may be seen, p. 161, 162.

[Valued at 1598 l. 1s. 3d. per Annum.]

WINBURNE, in Dorsetshire.

SAint Quinburga, and St. Cuthberga, Sisters of Ina King of the West Saxons, built here a Monastery for Nuns, Anno Dom. 718.

CROYLAND, in Lincolnshire.

CRoyland is one of those small Islands which lie in the East Fens. Here St. Guthlac, at the age of twenty five years, became a Hermite, and in his life time delivered the Island from Devils and evil Spirits, and dying, was here buried.

Ethelbald King of Mercia, by his Charter dated in the year 716. gave to God, the blessed Mary, and St. Bartholomew, the whole Isle of Croyland, containing four Leucas, or miles in length, and three in breadth, for the erecting of a Monastery under the Rule of St Benedict and endow'd the said Monastery with large Possessions lying about the Place.

All which was confirm'd to them by Offa King of Mercia, in the year 793. and by Withlaf, King of Mercia, in the year 833.

This Abby being afterwards burnt down and destroyed by the Pagan Danes, was re edified and restored to its former Possessions and Liberties, by King Eadred, who stiled himself King of Great Britain, in the year 948. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 853.

[Valued at 1803 l. 15s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

BEVERLEY, in Yorkshire.

SAint John Archbishop of York was the first Dr. of Theology in Oxford. He converted the Parish Church of St. John in the Town of Beverly, into a Monastery, building to it a new Quire; and made his Deacon Bithunus the first Abbot here. Both which lie buried in this Church. One hundred years after this the Monastery of Beverely was destroyed by the Danes, and lay in Ruines three years, before it was repair'd. King Athelstan built here a Colledge of secular Chanons. And granted and confirm'd to this Church of St. John of Beverley many great Priviledges and Liberties Anno Dom. 938. King Edward the Confessor was a great Benefactor to this Church, and augmented the number of the Prebendaries. William the Conqueror was also a Benefactor. Thomas the first Archbishop of York, erected a new Dignity in the Collegiate Church of Beverley, viz. a Prepositus or Provost, who has neither voice in the Chapter nor Stall in the Quire; of these, there is a List of thirty eight, Thomas Becket being the fifth in number. Vid. Vol. 3. part. 2. p. 3.

[Valued at 109 l. 8s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 17

RIPPON, in Yorkshire.

WIlfrid Archbishop of York founded a Monastery at Rippon which was afterwards burnt down, in the Devastation which King Aldred made upon the Northumbers. But being in after-times re edified, King Athelstan granted to this Church the Priviledge of Sanctuary, with the same Liberties which he had given before to the Church of Beverly; and that the men of Rippon should be believed by their yea, and their na.

St. FRIDISWADE, at Oxford.

FRidiswade the holy Virgin was Daughter of Didanus a petty King (Sub-regulus) of Oxford; her Father built a Church there in honour of St. Mary, and All Saints, and gave it for his Daughters Habitation, who with twelve other Nuns led there a religious Life. St Fridiswade died on the 14th. of the Calends of November 735 and was buried in the said Church. This Monastery and Church was afterwards burnt down, with the Danes in it, who had fled thither for Refuge but King Ethelred did soon alter rebuild it with additions as appears by his Charter dated in the year 1004. In the year 1111. Roger Bishop of Salisbury, in lieu of Nuns, instituted in this Monastery a Prior and Cannons, to whom King Henry I. gave a fair Estate in Lands and Tyths, which was confirm'd to them by Pope Adrian.

Benefactors to this Church of St. Frideswade in Oxford, were Maud the Empress, Earl Simon, Ralpth Foliot, and others.

See more of this Monastery, infra. p. 983.

DEREHAM, in Norfolk.

WIthburga Daughter of Anna King of the East Angles, built a Monastery for Nuns in this town and was buried here. After the Incursion of the Pagan Danes, the Nuns were all dispers'd, and the Church was made parochial. In the year 798, the Body of St. Withburga was found here, uncorrupted, near fifty five years after her death. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 853.

St. ALBANS-ABBY, in Hertfordshire.

SAint Alban was martyr'd in this place, then called Verolamium, in the time of Dioclesian's persecution. Ten years after that persecution ceas'd, the Christians built here a Church to his memory; which being destroy'd by the incursion of the barbarous People, Offa King of Mercia, about the year 793. repair'd the Church, built here a Monastery, stored it with Monks, translated the Reliques of the Martyr into a rich Shrine, and obtain'd of Pope Adrian to have him canonized. And by his Charter dated in the above-mentioned year granted to the said Monastery several Lands and great Priviledges. In the year 1154 Nicholas Bishop of Alba (an English-born man near this Monastery) being chosen Pope by the nae of Adrian IV.

18 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

granted to the Abbot of this Abby, that as St. Alban was the first Martyr of England, so this Abbot should be the first of all the Abbots of England in order and dignity.

King John by his Charter dated the 11th. of June in the first year of his Reign, granted to God, and the Church of St. Alban, and the Monks there, divers Lands and great Liberties.

Pope Honorius, by his Bull dated in the year 1218. confirm'd to this Church all Lands and Liberties granted to it by former Popes, Kings, and others, granting also to the Abbot and his Successors Episcopal Rights, and the Episcopal Habit, and that he and his Monks should be exempt from the Jurisdiction of the Bishop; with other exemptions, etc., reserving as a Rent to the Apostolick See yearly, for these Liberties, the payment of one ounce of Gold.

In the Windows of the Cloysters of this Abby, were formerly painted abundance of Hiatorical Passages out of the Bible, with Latin Verses underneath each Story, explaining the same. In like manner were the Windows of the Library, and Presbytery painted, with the Pictures of famous men, with explanatory Verses, which Verses may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 182, 183, 184.

[Valued at 2102 l. 7s. 1d. ob. q. per Annum.]

BATH, in Somersetshire.

KING Ofric was the first Founder of this Monastery for Nuns, Anno Dom. 676. Offa King of Mercia, placed here secular Cannons; and King Edgar introduced Monks instead of Cannons. King William the Conqueror gave the City of Bath to God, St. Peter, and John Bishop of Wells, for the augmentation of his Episcopal Seat King Henry the I, confirm'd the same, and constituted and confirm'd the Episcopal Seat of Somersetshire, which was formerly at Wells, to be at Bath, by Charter dated in the year 1111. and in the twelfth year of his Reign. The said John the Bishop, by his Deed dated 1106. appointed the Church of St. Peter here, to be the Head and Mother-Church of the whole Diocess, and restored the Lands which the King had given him in Bath, to the Monastery there, to which they did formerly belong; with an Anathema against the Violators of his said Gift and Restoration.

Oliver King Bishop of Bath, and Gibbs the last Prior here, built the present Church, p. 185.

[Valued at 617 l. 2s. 3d. per Annum.]

WELLS, in Somersetshire.

CInewulf, King of the West Saxons, in the year 766. gave to the Monastery at Wells dedicated to St. Andrew the Apostle, several parcells of Land adjoyning.

King Edward the Confessor Anno 1065. gave and confirm'd to the Church and Bishop of Wells, the Lands and Liberties formerly to the said Church given, with additions.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 19

WINCHCUMB, in Gloucestershire.

ANno Dom. 787. Offa King of Mercia, built here a Monastery for Nuns. Or as others say, it was built by Kenulphus King of Mercia A.D 798. and the Church dedicated by Wilfridus Archbishop of Canterbury and twelve other Bishops; at which dedication that King released at the Altar, the King of Kent, his Prisoner of War. This Monastery being almost utterly decay'd, in the time of King Edgar, was repaired by St. Osvald Archbishop of York, and Germanus made Abbot here. King Kenulfus is said to have placed here at the first Foundation no less then three hundred Monks. Of these three hundred Monks there might possibly be not above forty who were Priests or Clerks, the rest might be Hermits or as meer Lay men get their living by Working as in ancient Times Monks did use to do. The Mannors and Lands formerly belonging to this Monastery were eleven Towns with their Members, the names of which may be seen, p. 190. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 854.

[Valued at 759 l. 11s. 9d. per Annum.]

WILTON, in Wiltshire.

WUlfstan Earl of Wiltshire repaired an ancient Church here dedicated to St. Mary, and placed therein a Colledge of Priests. After whose death, his Widow Alburga, converted the Foundation to a Nunnery of Virgins, Anno Dom. 800. Afterwards King Alfred built at Wilton a new Monastery, and dedicated the Church to St. Mary and St. Bartholomew; here he placed twelve Nuns and an Abbess, and translated the other Nuns hither from St. Mary's, which made the number in all twenty six. Subsequent Benefactors were King Edward the Elder, King Athelstan, King Edgar, William the Conqueror, etc. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 857.

[Valued at 601 l. 1s. 1d. q. per Annum.]

AMBRESBURY, in Wiltshire.

THE Nunnery at Ambresbury was built by Queen Elfrida by way of expiation for the murder of King Edward the Younger, called St. Edward of which she had been guilty. In the Reign of Henry the II. Anno Dom 1177. the Nuns here were expell'd from this House and shut up in other religious Houses under stricter Custody, for their incontinency and notorious scandal. And other Nuns of Font-Everard introduced here, by the Authority of Pope Alexander, King Henry the II. and Richard Archbishop of Canterbury. Which King Henry the II. gave to the said Nunnery of Font Everard this Church as a Cell, with many other Lands and great Liberties, all which were confirm'd by King John in the first year of his Reign; with a Gift of 50s. per Annum out of the Exchequer for ever, in the fifth year of his Reign. Vid. 2. Vol p. 868.

[Valued at 495 l. 15s. 2d. per Annum.]

20 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

MIDLETON, in Dorsetshire.

KING Athelstan, having upon false accusations unjustly banisht his youngest Brother Edwyn, and put him to Sea in an old Vessel without either Sails or Oars, where he was drown'd; and being afterwards extream penitent, he built and endowed here a Church and Monastery in honour of St. Mary and St. Sampson the Archbishop; and stored it with Black Monks, for the Soul of his said Brother Edwyn.

He also purchased from Rome and other places beyond the Seas several holy Reliques; and gave them to this Monastery as a piece of our Saviour's Cross; a Great Cross composed of Gold, Silver, and precious Stones; the Arm and several Bones of St. Sampson the Archbishop, etc. King Athelstan's Charter of Endowment bears date in the year 843. and was exemplified and confirm'd by King Henry the II.

The same Founder built another Monastery on the same occasion, at a place called Michel; in Dorsetshire.

[Valued at 578 l. 13s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

POLESWORTH, in Warwickshire.

EGbert King of the West Saxons built here a Nunnery, and made his Daughter Edith the first Abbess there. King William the Conqueror gave this Estate to a Favourite of his called Sir Robert Marmyon, whose chief Seat was at the Neighbouring Castle of Tamworth, he expell'd the Nuns for a while, but not long after restored them again to their old Estate, and was reputed their Founder. The Nuns of Polesworth had a Cell at Olbury, which was given to their Monastery by Walter de Hastings, and confirm'd to them by Roger Bishop of Chester (then the same Diocess with Coventry and Litchfield) and others.

[Valued at 87 l. 16s. 3d. per Annum.]

St. WERBURGS, at Chester.

THE holy Virgin Werburg was Daughter of Wulfer King of Mercia, and Ermenilda his Wife. She lived and died in a Monastery at Chester, which had been built of old time for the Habitation of Nuns; but after the Conquest Hugh Earl of Chester placed Monks there.

The Monastery was built by King Edgar in the year 858. Hugh Earl of Chester having establisht Monks here, endow'd the Foundation with great Revenues, his Barons also giving very liberally to the same, whose Charter bears date Anno Dom. 1093. The Particulars given may be seen in the Monasticon at large, p. 201, 202.

See more of this House, p. 985.

[Valued at 1003 l. 5s. 11d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 21

ATHELING, in Somersetshire.

KING Elfred being driven out of his Kingdom by the Danes, conceal'd himself for some time in this place, then compast about with Marishes and Water, that it was inaccessable but with a Boat. Upon his restoration he built here a Church and Monastery. His Charter of Endowment bears date Anno Dom. 878.

About the same time that King Elfred founded this Monastery for Monks, he founded another for Nuns at Shaftesbury.

[Valued at 209 l. 0s. 3d. q. per Annum.]

PERSHORE, in Worcestershire.

THE Monastery here was built in the time of King Edgar by Duke Egelwardus; but the greatest part of its Estate was in aftertime transferred by King Edward and King William to Westminster. Others say, it was founded about the year 604. by Oswald Nephew of King Athelred. Oswald did at first place here secular Canons, which were after changed to Monks, then Canons restored, and then Monks once again introduced by King Edgar. Anno Dom. 1223. there happened a grievous fire here, and the Monks for some time having left the place, their Estate was usurpt by the Monks of Westminster. The Deeds, and Charters of Priviledges of this House being burnt, Witnesses were examined and made several Depositions of the ancient Liberties and Customs used, and of right belonging to this Monastery, which may be seen in the Monasticon at large.

[Valued at 643 l. 4s. 5d. per Annum.]

HIDE, in Hampshire.

THIS is otherwise called the new Monastery at Winchester, and was designed by King Elfred, but built after his death by his Son King Edward, who placed therein secular Canons under the Rule of a holy man call'd Grimbaldus. This new Monastery being at first built within the City, close to the Cathedral Church, was on the account of several inconveniencies in the Scituation, removed in the year 1121. to the place called Hide. Great was the Revenue given to this Monastery, and many the Benefactors besides the Founder, as King Athelstan, King Edmund, King Edred, King Edgar (who expell'd the Canons and placed Monks here) King Edmund Ironside, Edward the Consessor, William the Conqueror, Henry I. and Maud his Queen, etc.

But this House was not without its misfortunes, William the Conqueror at his first coming finding the Abbot and twelve of his Monks in arms against him, seiz'd upon their Estate and held it from them almost two years. And in the Reign of King Stephen, Henry then Bishop of Winchester committed such extortions upon the Monks here, that he got from them almost all their Church Plate, and was so oppressive that of forty Monks, there remained but ten in the House.

22 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

King Edgars Diploma to this House was written in Letters of Gold, and dated Anno Dom. 966.

The Priviledges of this House were agreed and settled between William Bishop of Winchester and Gaufridus Abbot here. Anno Dom. 1110.

[Valued at 865 l. 18s. 0d. ob.q. per Annum.]

WINCHESTER Monastery of Nuns.

ABout the year 903. Alswitha Wife of King Alfred, began the Foundation of a Nunnery at Winchester, which was after her death compleated by her Son King Edward the Elder.

[Valued at 179 l. 7s. 2d. per Annum.]

St. PETROCUS, at Bodmin, in Cornwall.

KING Athelstan was the first Founder of this Monastery for Monks; which after the Conquest, came into the Crown, but was purchased by Alganus, and stored with Canons regular.

St. GERMAINS, in Cornwall.

KING Athelstan founded a Monastery here, which at that time was the Seat of a Bishop, but was afterwards removed by King Edward the Confessor from hence to Exeter. Bartholomew Bishop of Exeter introduced into this Church by the King's Authority, Canons Regular, eight in number, and a Prior.

[Valued at 243 l. 8s. per Annum.]

SHAFTESBURY, in Dorsetshire.

KING Elfred built this Town in the year 880. Elgiva Wife of Edmund, great Grand-child of the said Elfred, built here a Monastery for Nuns. King Edward the younger, commonly called St. Edward the Martyr, murder'd by his Mother-in-Laws procurement, was here interr'd, on which account this Church was afterwards call'd by his name.

Benefactors to this House were King Edmund, King Edred, A.D. 948. and King Etheldred, 1001.

See more of this Monastery, p. 983.

[Valued at 1166 l. 8s. 9d. per Annum.]

TAVESTOCK, in Devonshire.

ORdgarus an Earl in these Parts, and Father of Elfrid Wife of King Edgar, built this Monastery in the year 961, for Monks. It was afterwards burnt down by the Danes. King Edelred, in the year 981. endow'd it with Lands and Liberties; the like did King Henry the I. all

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 23

which was exemplified and confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the twenty second Year of his Reign.

See more of this Monastery, p. 995.

[Valued at 902 l. 5s. 7d. per Annum.]

RUMSEY, in Hampshire.

KING Edward the Elder, built here a Monastery, in which his Grandson King Edgar placed religious Nuns, under the Government of Merwina their Abbess, Anno Dom. 907.

King Edgar, King Henry III. and King Edward I. were Benefactors to this House, and confirm'd the Lands and Liberties to them given.

[Valued at 393 l, 10s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

HORTON, in Dorsetshire.

ORgarus Earl of Devonshire (formerly mention'd) was the first Founder of this Monastery, who after his decease, which happen'd in the year 971. was here buried.

Roger Bishop of Shirburn, obtain'd of King Henry the I. that this House and the Possessions thereunto belonging should be transfer'd and annext to the Monastery of Shirburn, so that in after times it was accounted only as a Cell of that House, tho' it had been before that reckon'd as an Abby it self.

EXETER, in Devonshire.

THE Kingdom of the West Saxons having been, destitute of a Bishop for full seven years before, Pope Formosus threatn'd to curse King Edward the Elder, in the year 905. unless he would restore Bishops according to the ancient Tradition. Hereupon that King calling a Synod, in which presided Plegmundus Archbishop of Canterbury, did by their advice constitute several Bishops Seats, and set out their several Diocesses, and the Archbishop ordain'd seven Bishops in one day to seven Churches, among which Athelstan was made Bishop of Cornwall, and Eadulf of Cridington. In the year 1046. King Edward the Confessor united these two Bishopricks, and soon after at the request of Pope Leo fixt the Seat of the Bishop in the Monastery of St. Mary and St. Peter at Exeter, the then Bishop Leofric being introduced into the Cathedral Church betwixt the King and Queen. Which Bishop finding the said Church much decay'd and impoverisht in its Goods and Revenues became a great Benefactor, giving to it not only several Books and Church Ornaments but divers Lands and recover'd for the Monastery other Lands which had been formerly given, and since lost and taken from them.

King Athelstan, soon after his coming to the Crown of this Kingdom, erected the Monastery here to St. Mary and St. Peter, and endow'd it with twenty six Towns and Villages, and gave to it the third part of those many Relicks which he had caused to be collected beyond the Seas. viz. some pieces of our Lord's Cross, Sepulcher, Garment, Cradle, etc., with many

24 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

others, which may be seen at large, p. 225, 226. After him King Athelred, King Cnut, King Edward the Confessor, King John, and King Henry the III. became Benefactors: so also King Henry the I. who restored to this Monastery several Churches which had been taken from it.

RAMSEY, in Huntingdonshire.

IN the year 969. Ailwinus Duke of the East Angels, at the instigation of Oswald Archbishop of York, founded the Monastery of Ramsey, which was consecrated by St. Dunstan Archbishop of Canterbury, and the said Oswald, in the year 974. and the Church dedicated to the blessed Mary and all holy Virgins, and to St. Benedict.

Ramsey is a small Island, situated among Fens and Marishes, in the East corner of Huntingdonshire, about two miles long, and near as broad. It was formerly very much abounding with Alders and other Trees that delight in moist Ground, from whence it might take its name Ramsey a ramis, quasi Insula Ramorum.

At the Foundation of this Church King Edgar gave to it five Hides of Land. St. Oswald also gave several Ornaments and Lands, and procured to it others.

Duke Ailwinus the Founder gave to this Abby the whole Isle in which it stood with the adjacent Marishes and Meers, and divers other Lands. All which, with other Lands from other Benefactors, King Edgar confirm'd to this Abby, granting also divers great Priviledges as a Sanctuary, etc. The like was done by King Edward the Confessor, with the addition of several other Liberties and Priviledges. King Henry the I. King Henry the II. King Richard, King John, and King Edward the I. were also Royal Benefactors.

Ailwinus the Founder gave many precious Ornaments besides two hundred Hides of Land, and departed this Life on the 8th. of the Calends of May. His Epitaph was as follows,

Hic requiescit Ailwinus, inclyti regis Edgari cognatus, totius Angliae Algermanus, & hujus sacri caenobii, miraculose, fundator.

ABBOTS of RAMSEY.

1 AEdnothus, A.D. 970.
2 Wufilus 1008.
3 Withmannus l016.
4 Ethelstanus 1020.
5 Alfwinus 1043.
6 Aielfinus 1080.
7 Herbertus made Bishop of Norwich 1087.
8 Aldwinus 1091.
9 Bernardus was Abbot for five years in the life of Aldwinus.
10 Reginaldus 1114.
11 Walterus 1133.
12 Willielmus 1161.
13 Robertus Trianel 1180.
14 Eudo 1200.
15 Robertus de Redinges 1202.
16 Richardus 1214.
17 Hugo Foliot 1216.
18 Ranulfus 1231.
19 Willielmus Acolt 1253.
20 Hugo de Sulgrave 1254.
21 Willielmus 1267.
22 Johannes 1285.
23 Simon 1316.
24 Robertus 1342.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 25

25 Ricardus 1349.
26 Edmundes 1382.
27 Thomas Botterwick 1400.
28 Johannes Tychemarsh 1419.
29 Johannes Crowland 1434.
30 Johannes Stowe 1436.

The memorable Occurrances in the times of these several Abbots may be seen in the Monasticon, p. 241, 242. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 869.

[Valued at 1716 l. 12s. 4d. per Annum.]

THORNEY, in Cambridgeshire.

THIS Monastery was founded in the year 972. by St. Adelwold Bishop of Winchester, in the Reign of King Edgar. In the year 1085. the Church was new built by Gunterius the then Abbot here, and dedicated by Hervey the first Bishop of Ely. In the year 973. King Edgar granted to this Abby several Lands and Priviledges.

Principal Benefactors to this House were Nigellus Bishop of Ely, William Peverel, several of the Beauchamps, Henry de Merch, William de Alleneis, Brito, Thurstan de Montfort, and John de Stutavill, etc. The Lands and Benefactions of whom, were recited and confirmed to this Abby by the Bull of Pope Alexander dated A.D. 1162.

ABBOTS of THORNEY.

A.D.

1085. Gunterius.
1113. Robertus I.
1151. Gilbertus.
1154. Galterus.
1158. Herbertus.
1163. Walterus.
1176. Solamon.
1193. Robertus II.
1198. Radulphus.
1216. Robertus III.
1231. Wido Wake.
1237. Ricardus.
1238. David.
1244. Thomas Caftre.
1261. Willielmus Takesley.
1293. Odo de Whitlesey.
1305. Willielmus Clopton.
1322. Reginaldus de Water Newton.
1347. Willielmus Haddon.
1365. Johannes Depyng.
1396. Nicholaus Islep.
1402. Thomas Charw.
1425. Alanus Kirketon.
1437. Johannes Kirketon.
1450. Johannes Ramsey.

[Valued at 411 l. 12s. 11d. per Annum.]

CHATERIZ, in Cambridgeshire.

THE Mannor of Chateriz was given by King Edgar, to the Abbot of Ramsey. Ednodus Abbot of Ramsey built a Church and Monastery for Nuns at Chateriz, and endow'd it with necessaries; which Ednodus or Ednothus being Bishop of Dorchester was murdered by the Danes, 1016. King Henry the I. gave and annext this Abby to the Church of Ely, and Herveus the first Bishop there. Pope Innocent the IV. confirm'd the Estate and Priviledges of this Abby to the Abbess and Sisters here, about the year 1242. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 869.

[Valued at 97 l. 3s. 4d. q. per Annum.]

26 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

CERNE, in Dorsetshire.

SAint Augustine the Monk after he had converted Kent, travelled with his Companions over the rest of King Ethelberts Dominions, which extended as far as the Northumbers, preaching the Gospel of Christ. And being in Dorsetshire a great Company of people offer'd themselves to Baptism in a place where water was wanting, whereupon by miracle a Fountain of Water burst out of the Ground, which was in the succeeding times call'd St. Augustin's Fountain. Here Edwaldus Brother of St. Edmund the King and Martyr, led a Hermits life, and died with the reputation of great Sanctity; which occasion'd that Egelwaldus or Ethelwerdus built here a Monastery to the honour of St. Peter, which his son Ethelmer Earl of Cornwall A.D. 987. endow'd with divers Lands.

[Valued at 515 l. 17s. 10d. q. per Annum.]

St. IVES, in Huntingdonshire.

IN the year 1001. the Body of St. Ivo being found in this Town then called Slepe, and translated from his Grave to a Shrine, the Town ever after took name from the Saint, and Ednothus Abbot of Ramsey, built here a Church. Pope Urban confirm'd the Estate of this Monastery to the Prior and Monks of the same and to their Successors, granting them many great Priviledges, among others, that they should pay no Tithes of their Lands and Cattle which they should hold in their own proper hands.

It was found by Inquisition in the 36 H. 3. that the Parish Church of St Ives dedicated to the honour of all Saints, is a Vicarage of the Presentation of the Abbot of Ramsey, that the Prior of St. Ives as Parson receives all Corn-Tithes, and of the Vicar for his portion 4 l. 13s. 4d. That the Vicar receives all small Tithes, obventions, Mortuaries (Testamenta) Plow-alms, Rates and other Customs, which fee in the Book at large.

WARWELL, in Hampshire.

KING Edgar hearing extraordinary Commendations of the beauty of Elfrida Daughter of Odgar Duke of Devonshire, sent Earl Ethelwold, to discover if the young Lady's beauty was equal to report, the Earl finding it so, disparaged her to the King, and secretly married her himself. After a while the King perceiving himself to have been treacherously deceived, took occasion one day to take the Earl aside as they were hunting in Warewell-wood, and there slew him. In expiation of which Deed Elfrida, who was after her first Husband's death married to King Edgar, built here a Monastery for Nuns, in honour of the holy Cross. This Monastery was afterwards endowed with Lands by King Ethelred Son of the said Edgar and Elfrid in the year 1002. as appears by Inspectimus 44. H. 3. Vid. 3. Vol. p. 9.

[Valued at 339 l, 8s. 7d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 27

EYNESHAM, in Oxfordshire.

THIS Monastery was situated near the River Thames, founded and endowed by one Thelmarus, a man of Quality under King Ethelred, who confirmed the Lands given to it, and granted divers Liberties and Priviledges to the same, in the year of our Lord 1005.

To this House a Monastery at Stow near Lincoln, built and endow'd by Godiva Wife of Leofrick Earl of Chester, was formerly annext as a Cell.

In the year 1109. King Henry the I. repair'd this Monastery, at that time decay'd, and confirm'd to it all its Lands and Liberties.

[Valued at 44 l. 12s. 2d. ob. q. per Annum.]

BURTON, in Staffordshire.

WUlfricus Spot, an Officer in the Court of King Ethelred built this Abby and endow'd it with all his paternal Inheritance, amounting to 700 l. and gave to that King three hundred Mancas of Gold to purchase his Confirmation of what he had done. The Names of the several Lands and Mannors given to this Abby may be seen, p. 268, 269.

King Ethelred granted to this Abby great Liberties in all their Lands, by his Charter dated in the year 1006. And Pope Lucius the III. in the year 1185. confirm'd to them all their Lands, granting also many great Priviledges to the said Abby, as that they should pay no Tithes of what they held in their own hands, etc.

The afore-mention'd Wulfricus Spot, the Founder of this Abby, was Earl of Mercia, and one of the Blood Royal. Upon the Foundation, (which was in the year 1004) certain Monks were removed to this House from Winchester. Wulfricus was slain in a Battle against the Danes, A.D. 1010. and was buried in the Cloyster of this House.

A List of the Abbots of Burton upon Trent from the first Foundation to the Dissolution.

1 Wulfgetus. ob. 1026.
2 Britericus. ob. 1050.
3 Leuricus. ob. 1085.
4 Galfridus Malaterra expell'd 1094.
5 Nigellus. ob. 1114.
6 Galfridas resigned 1150. to
7 Robertus deposed and expell'd 1159.
8 Barnardus ob. 1175.
9 Robert chosen again ob. 1177.
10 Rogerus Malebraunch ob. 1182.
11 Ricardus ob. 1188.
12 Nicholaus ob. 1197.
13 Willielmus Melburne ob. 1210.
14 Rogerus Normannus ob. 1218.
15 Nicholas de Wallingford ob. 1222.
16 Richardus de Insula, removed to be Abbot of St. Edmunds 1229.
17 Laurentius ob. 1240.
18 Johannes Stafford ob. 1280.
19 Thomas Pakington ob. 1305.
20 Johannes Pisoator alias Stapunhull. ob. 1316.
21 Willielmus de Bromley, ob. 1329.
22 Robertus Longdone. ob. 1340.
23 Robertus Brickhull. ob. 1348.
24 Johannes Ipstoke. ob. 1366.
25 Thomas Southam. ob. 1400.
26 Johannes Sudburie resign'd 1424.
27 Willielmus Mathew. ob. 1430.
28 Robertus Ousby resign'd 1432.
29 Radulphus Henley resign'd 1454.
30 Willielmus Bronston. ob. 1472.
31 Thomas Feylde. ob. 1493.
32 Willielmus Heigh, ob. 1502.
33 Willielmus Beyne ob. 1525.
34 Johannes Boston.
35 Ricardus Edes, the last Abbot of Burton.

28 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

The remarkable Occurrences during the times of the said several Abbots may be seen in the Book at large. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 869.

[Valued at 267 l. 14s. 3d. per Annum.]

ABBOTSBURY, in Dorsetshire.

ABout the year 1026. one Orcus a Great man in the Court of K. Canulus, together with his Wife Tola, being both without hope or possibility of issue, built and endow'd the Monastery at Abbotsbury, and dedicated it to St. Peter the Apostle. The said Orcus did also give a hall to a Guild or Fraternity in this Town, and by agreement between him and the Brethren, certain Orders were settled for the Rule and Governance of the said Fraternity, to the glory of God, and honour of St. Peter. King Edward the Confessor, and King William the Conqueror ratified Orcus and his Wives Benefactions to the Monks here, and granted them certain Franchises. By inquisition taken before the Escheator and Sheriff of this County, in the 53 Hen. 3. The several Lands, Rents, and Liberties of this Abby were found and set forth; the Jury also found that the Abbot here held his Estate of the King in Capite by the service of one Knight's Fee only, and not, in Baronia, by the service of a Barony.

In the year 1505. Thomas Strangeways Esq. founded a perpetual Chantry in the Chappel of the Blessed Mary in the Church of this Abby, and endow'd it with Rents, for the maintenance of one Mass to be said in the said Chappel daily for ever, for the Souls of his Ancestors and Friends, and for all the Faithful, subjecting it to the Visitation of the Bishop; and the Abbot did oblige himself to find a Monk (in case he should have above eight Monks, Priests, in the Monastery) to perform the Office: and this under the penalty of 3s. 4d. to the Bishop of the Diocess, and 3s. 4d. to the Heirs of the said Strangeways, for every omission.

[Valued at 590 l. 19s. 2d. ob. q. per Annum.]

HULME, in Suffolk.

CANutus the Danish King of England, returning from Rome, built two Monasteries to the honour of St. Benedict, one in Norwey, and the other this in England. Which last he founded in a fenny place then call'd Couholm, where, in former-times, before the Danes came into England, one Suneman a Hermite did inhabit, spending his time in devotion there for above fifty years. To the Abby here built, the said King Canutus gave many Lands and Priviledges. All which King Edward the Confessor confirm'd, and granted others, Sacne, and Sokne, Toll, and Theam, etc., and all other Liberties and free Customs which he himself enjoy 'd in his own Demeans, and Lands belonging to the Crown.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 29.

St. EDMUNDSBURY, in Suffolk.

SAint Edmund the last King of the East Angles, being overcome by Inguar., and Hubba Pagan Danes, was cruelly bound to a Tree, whipt, and then shot to death, suffering martyrdom for the Christian Religion, in the year of our Lord 870. and the 29th. of his Age. His Head and Body were thrown into a thick Wood by the Pagans, but being afterwards found out by miracle, he was buried at a Neighbouring place call'd by the Saxons Beodrichesworth (now St. Edmunsbury) where the Christians built a small Church. But afterwards King Canutus (who had erected at Rome an English School, and assign'd for its maintenance a Sum of Money which was yearly sent from England, and call'd Romescot) by advice of his Bishops and Barons, changed the secular Clergy, belonging to this Church, to Monks, in the year 1020 and brought hither from the Abby of Hulme thirteen religious Benedictines, whose first Abbot here was one Wius. He also caused half the Books, Vestments, and Utinsils of that Abby to be removed hither. King Edmund the Elder in the year 942. gave Lands to this Church and after him the foresaid King Canutus gave many Lands to this Monastery, and rebuilt it in a magnificent manner.

Controversies arising in the Reign of King William the Conqueror, between the Abbot and the Bishop of the Diocess, the Abbot went to Rome, and found such favour wich Pope Alexander the II. that he granted to him and his Successors Episcopal Jurisdiction, and this special priviledge, viz., That so long as they kept a porphery Altar, which he then gave him, tho' the whole Kingdom should fall under Excommunication, yet the Divine Office should not cease in this Abby unless specially interdicted by name. His Bull bears date Anno Dom. 1071. In the year 1081. the Contest between the Bishop and Abbot was examined before King William the Conqueror, and upon hearing both sides, that King did declare the Church of St. Edmund, and the Town in which it stands, to be exempt from the Bishops Jurisdiction.

The Steward or Seneschall's Office for the Liberty of St. Edmund, was a place of great honour, and the Family of Hastings held it in Fee. They enjoy'd several great Fees and Advantages by Custom, in case they executed the Office in their own Person, but if by Deputy or Lieutenant, then the said Deputy received half. All which particulars were found by inquision in the 30th. year of Edward the I.

In the year 1010. the Body of St Edmund was translated to London, this Country being infested by the Danes; but after three years it was brought back again. In the year 1021. soon after King Canutus had introduced Monks here, Aldwinus Bishop of the East Angles, began to build a stately new Church, to which work and for the maintenance of the Fabrick, the Inhabitants of Norfolk and Suffolk did freely give yearly 4d. out of every Carucate of Land in the Country. This Church was in the year 1032. dedicated in honour of Christ, the Blessed Mary, and St. Edmund.

King Edward the Confessor, King William the I. King Henry the I. King Steven, and King Richard, with many Bishops, and other Persons of Quality of both Sexes gave Lands and great Revenues to this Abby.

The Body of St. Edmund remain'd intire and uncorrupted, and was so seen by many witnesses.

30 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

ABBOTS of St. EDMUNDSBURY.

1 Wius, Monk of Hulme, ob. 1044.
2 Leoffranus, ob. 1065.
3 Baldwinus, ob. 1097.
4 Robert, son of Hugh Earl of Chester depos'd 1102.
5 Robert, Prior of Westminster, ob. 1107.
6 Alboldus, ob. 1119.
7 Anselmus, Nephew of Anselm Archbishop of Cant was 1138. chosen Bisop of London but not received there, ob. 1148.
8 Ordingus, ob. 1156.
9 Hugh, Prior of Westminster, ob. 1180.
10 Sampson, ob. 1211.
11 Hugo, chosen Abbot 1213. consecrated Bishop of Ely 1229. ob. 1254.
12 Richard, Abbot of Burton, ob. 1233.
13 Henry, ob. 1248.
14 Edmund de Walpool, Doctor in the Decretals, ob. 1256.
15 Simon, elected, 1257.
16 John de Norwold, ob. 1301.
17 Thomas de Tottington, ob. 1312.
18 Richard de Draugton, ob. 1337.
19 William de Bernham, ob. 1361.
20 Henry de Hunstanton died before Confirmation:
21 Johannes de Brinkele ob. 1379.
22 Johannes Tynmouth, created, 7 R 2.
25 Willielmus de Cratfeild, created 13 R. 2.
24 Willielmus Exeter. 5 H.6.
25 Willielmus Curteys, 7 H. 6.
26 Johames Boon, created Abbot 1457.
27 Richardus Hengham 1475.
28 Thomas Raclesden 1478.
29 John Reeve, alias Melford, the last Abbot of Bury created 5 Hen. 8.

By Covenant made between the above-mentioned John Norwood Abbot here on the one part, and the Prior and Convent of this Monastery on the other, the Mannors, Lands, and Revenues belonging to this Abby were divided and appropriated to the several Offices of the House, as such and such Lands and Revenues to the Abbot, such to the Celerarius, for the diffraying of his Office, such to the Sacristan for the Charges incumbant on him, such to the Camerarius, such to the Almoner, such to the Pitanciarius, such to the Infirmarius, such to the Hospillarius, and such to the Praecentor. But all Law-Suits concerning any the Lands or Estate of the Abby the Abbot was to manage at his own proper Charges. Also the Abbot was to entertain all secular Guests as well Horse-men as Footmen, in case he was resident with his Family in Town, but the Convent was to entertain religious Persons, and in case the Abbot be absent, then the Convent to entertain also secular persons, if under thirteen Horse. This agreement, between the Abbot and Convent was made in the year 1281. And exemplified by King Edward the I. in the same year, being the 9th. of his Reign.

The Names of the Sacristans of BURY.

1 Thurstan. } In the time of Abbot Baldwin.
2 Tolimus. }
3 Godefridus.
4 Radulphus.
5 Harueus.
6 Helias Widewell.
7 Frodo.
8 Willielmus Schuch.
9 Willielmus Wardel.
10 Hugo.
11 Walterus de Banham.
12 Willielmus de Disce.
13 Robertus de Granele, chosen Abbot of Thorney.
14 Richardus de Insula, chosen Abbot of Burton, and at last Abbot here 1233.
15 Dominus de Newport.
16 Georgius, first Precentor, then Sacristan, then Prior here, reputed a Saint.
17 Nicholaus. 18 Simon de Luyton, chosen Prior, and then Abbot here 1257.
19 Richardus de Horninshe.
20 Richardus de Colecester.
21 Simon de Kingston, first, Celarer, and then Chamberlain, 22 Willielmus de Luyton.
23 Richardus le Brun.

Of the Buildings about the Church and Abby, perform'd, in the times of the Sacristans above-mention'd, see the Book at large.

Vol. I. BENEDICTINES. 51

To the Cellarer of this House (whose Office was to make provision for the diet of the whole Covent) did belong many Rights and Priviledges by ancient Custom. He kept the Court of the Lordship in the Town, from which he received divers annual Profits. His Officers were to be first served in the Market in buying provisions, if the Abbot were not in Town. Also the Cellerar and Abbots Officers were to have Herrings a half-penny in the hundred cheaper than any other people.

[Valued at 1659 l. 13s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

COVENTRY, in Warwickshire.

THIS Monastery was built by Leofricus Earl of Chester, and Godiva his Wife (a most pious Lady) and plentifully endow'd with Lands and Revenues. The Church was so richly adorn'd with Gold and Silver, and precious Stones, that the Walls seem'd too narrow to contain all the Treasure.

The Founder Earl Leofrick died in the year 1057. and was buried at Coventry, as was also his Wife Godiva, in the Church-Porch of their own Foundation. In which Church was formerly kept an Arm of the Great St. Augustine, inclosed in Silver.

Robert de Limesey (who was made Bishop of Chester A.D. 1088. and died 1116.) obtain'd of King Henry the I. The Monastery of Coventry and constituted it the Capital Cathedral of that Diocess. Whose Successor in that See, Hugh Bishop of Coventry, A.D. 1191. expell'd the Monks out of the Cathedral Church here, and placed in their room, secular Canons. But in the year 1198, Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, by order of Pope Celestine, restored the Monks to the possession of their Church again.

It appears by Earl Leofricks Charter of Foundation that he built this Church and Monastery to the honour of God and St. Mary his Mother, St. Peter the Apostle, St. Osburga the Virgin, and all Saints. And gave to the Maintenance of the Monks here serving God, twenty four Villages, with the Moiety of the Town of Coventry in which it stands, with all Liberties and Customs which he himself enjoy'd in the said Estate, and that the Abbot of the said House should be subject to none but the King. All which grants King Edward the Confessor did confirm to Leofwinus the first Abbot there and his Successors. Also Pope Alexander by his Bull directed to the said King Edward bearing date 1043. confirm'd all their Liberties and Exemptions, granting them full power to chose their

32 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

own Abbots or Deans, without any Lett or Hindrance from the Aposlolick Authority.

Leofwinus, the first Abbot of Coventry, being created Bishop of Chester, ordain'd with the Consent of the Monks, that his Successors, Superiors of that Monastery should be call'd Priors and not Abbots.

PEYKIRK, in Northamptonshire.

IN the year 1048. one Wulgatus then Abbot of a Monastery in this Town, lost his Abby and the Lands thereunto belonging, to the abbot of Peterborough, who claim'd the same as parcel of his Estate. And this was by Judgment given in the Court of King Hardi Canute.

SPALDING, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of Croyland, etc.

ANno Dom. 1052. Thoroldus de Bukenhale Brother to Godiva Countess of Leicester, having obtain'd six Monks from Wulgate Abbot of Croyland, began the Priory of Spalding, assigning to it divers Lands, and annext it as a Cell to Croyland.

In the year 1074. Tuo Taylboys Earl of Anjou (Andegavia) having married Kucia Great Grand-daughter of the foresaid Godiva became Lord of Spalding and all Holland; and gave the Cell of Spalding to a Monk of St. Nicholas of Anjou. He also confirm'd the Estate which his Great Uncle Thorold had given to this House, and procured the like Confirmation from the 2 Williams and Hen. 1st Kings of England. In the year 1085. Tuo Taylboys, by License of King William the Conqueror, gave this Cell to the Abby of St. Nicholas of Anjou, with the Lands and Estate thereunto belonging. All which, with divers Liberties, was confirm'd to the said Abby of St. Nicholas by King William the I. William the II. and Henry the I. And also by King John in the first year of his Reign.

See more, Vol. 2. p. 871.

[Valued at 767 l. 8s. 11d. per Annum.]

BATTEL Abby, in Sussex.

IN the year 1067. King William the Conqueror built this Abby in the same place where he fought and overcame Harold and his Army, that herein perpetual praise and thanks might be given to God for the said Victory and Prayers made for the Souls of those who were here slain. It was dedicated to St. Martin, and largely endow'd with Lands and Priviledges.

In this Battle, it is said, that above ten thousand men lost their lives, on the conquering side; but what number of the conquered may be guest with astonishment.

King William design'd to have endow'd this Abby with Lands sufficient for the constant maintenance of seven score Monks, but death prevented. However he granted to it, to be free from the Bishops Jurisdiction, to have Sanctuary, to have Treasure trove, with many other Royal Liberties and Exemptiona. He translated from an Abby in Normandy called Major-Monasterium, several Monks, among whom one Gausbertus, who he appointed the first

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 33

abbot of Battuil. And gave to this Abby the Mannor of Wi in Kent, with other Mannors In Sussex, Surrey, Essex, Barkshire, Oxfordshire, and Devonshire, with free Warren in all their Lands.

Yet King William gave this caution or restriction to the Abbot, that he should not wast the Alms belonging to this Abby upon his secular kindred or others but take care to bestow them upon poor People and Travellers, etc.

King William Rufus, and King henry the I. were also Benefactors to this House.

[Valued at 880 l. 14s. 7d. ob. q. per Annum.]

BRECKNOCK, in Wales, a Cell to Battel Abby.

BErnard de Newmarch was a Noble Norman in the Reign of King Henry the I. and was the first Conqueror of the Lands about Brecknock. He gave to Battel Abby his Church of St. John the Evangelist in his Castle of Brecknock. Roger Earl of Hereford Grandson of the foresaid Bernard gave divers Lands and Tithes to the Monks in the Church of St. John of Brecknock, together with divers Liberties and Exemptions. All which was aitervvards confirm'd by Maibel de Hereford, and William de Braiose. Other benefactors were Herbert Fitz Peter, John Fitz Reginald, etc.

[Valued at 112 l. 14s. 2d. per Annum.]

ARMETHWAYT, in Cumberland.

KING William the Conqueror founded here a Monastery for black Nuns; and endow'd it with divers Lands, and such Priviledges as were granted to the Church of Westminster. This he granted in pure and perpetual Alms as freely "As hert may it thynk of ygh may it se".

This Nunnery being seated so very near the borders of Scotland was so impoverisht by the Scots frequent Spoils and Inroads, that it was in a manner reduced to nothing, whereupon King Edward the IV. did in the thirteenth year of his Reign, new grant, ratifie, and confirm their Lands and Estate unto the then Prioress and Nuns here.

[Valued at 18 l. 18s. 8d. per Annum.]

BEAULEIU (Bellus Locus) in Bedfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

THE Church of St. Mary in this place, of old call'd Moddry, was at first a Hermitage and built by a Hermite called Rodolphus. It was afterwards given by Robert de Albeneio, with the consent of his Mother Secvia, to the Abby or St. Albans, and became a Cell of that House. Which Robert endow'd it with divers Lands, all which he gave to God, and St. Alban, and to the Monks of Beauleiu, in Fee, to hold in free Alms.

34 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

WALLINGFORD, in Barkshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

THE Church here, dedicated to the holy Trinity, was made a Cell of St. Albans, in the time of Paul Abbot there. King Henry the VI. was a Benefactor to the Priory of Wallingford. Vid. Vol. p. 11.

BELVOIR or Beaver, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

RObertus de Toteneio Lord of the Castle of Belvoir, gave the Church of St. Mary, adjoyning to his said Castle, to the Abby of St. Albans to be a Cell of that House, endowing it with divers Lands and Tithes; appointing it for the Burial-place of himself and Wife, in case they died in England, and such it afterwards proved to be for his descendents.

The Lands hereunto given were confirm'd successively by the Heirs and Progeny of the said Robert, and lastly by Thomas Lord Ros, in the 8. Hen. 6.

[Valued at 104 l. 19s 10d per Annum.]

HATFEILD-PEVERELL, in Hertfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

William Peverell gave the Church of St. Mary at Hatfeild with his own Mansion-House there, for a Habitation of Monks, and endow'd the same with Lands; all which was afterwards annext to St. Albans, and became a Cell of that House.

[Valued at 60 l. 14s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

HERTFORD, a Cell of St. Albans.

RAdulfus de Limesey, having erected a Church at Hertford, he gave the same for a Cell to the Abby of St. Albans, and with it divers Lands in Hertford and elsewhere. The Abbot of St. Albans obliging himself to send thither six Monks of his House to serve God at Hertford, and in case the Revenue should be augmented then to send a greater number.

Hadwisia, Wife of the said Radulfus, Alan de Limesey their Son, Gerard his Son, and John de Limesey his Son, were all Benefactors to this Church of St. Mary's at Hertford, and to the Monks of St. Albans serving God herein.

[Valued at 72 l. 14s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

TINEMOUTH, in Northumberland, a Cell of St. Albans.

RObert de Mulbray a Norman of noble extraction, to whom King William the Conqueror gave the Earldom of Northumberland, endow'd the Church of St. Mary, adjoyning to his Castle of Tinemouth, and in which the Body of St. Oswin King and Martyr rested, with fair Revenues, and gave it for a Cell to the Monks of St. Albans. David King of Scotland

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 35

was a Benefactor to this House; so were King Henry the I. of England, King Henry the II. and King John, who granted to God and the Church of St. Oswin in Tinmouth, and the Monks of St. Albans serving God here, many Lands, and great Liberties, which Liberties tho' seiz'd by King Edward the III. yet were by him in the second year of his Reign regranted to them in as large a manner as ever, out of the special Devotion which he bore to the two glorious Martyrs St. Alban and St. Oswin.

[Valued at 397 l. 1s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

WYMUNDHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell of St. Albans.

ANno Dom. 1139. William de Allaneio Butler to King Henry the I. built the Church of St. Mary and Priory of Monks, at this Town, endow'd the same with Revenues, and annext it as a Cell to St. Albans; yet so as they might choose a Prior among themselves and present him to their Founder, whom he was not to refuse without good Cause. And the Monks here paid only a Mark of Silver yearly to the Abbot of St. Albans as an acknowledgment of subjection.

King Henry the I. confirm'd the Estate given to this House with the grant of many great Liberties. The like did also William Earl of Sussex, Grandson of the foresaid William the Founder.

Afterwards in the 27th. of King Henry the VI. by Authority of Pope Nicholas the V. and at the Petition of Sir Andrew Ogard Kt. then Patron of this Monastery, it was discharged from any dependency on the Abby of St. Albans, and from paying the Mark per Annum, and made an Abby of it self, and Steven London then Prior, the first Abbot. All which was allow'd and confirm'd by the said King Henry the VI. who at the same time pardon'd all penalties incurr'd by the Parties concern'd in procuring the Popes Bull by reason of the Statute of Provisors, or any other Statute.

[Valued at 211 l. 16s. 6d. q. per Annum.]

BINHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell of St. Albans.

PEter de Valoniis and Albreda his Wife gave the Church of St. Mary at Binham to the Abby of St. Albans, but to be subject only in such manner as St. Pancrace at Lewis is subject to St. Peter of Clugni, paying yearly to the Church of St. Alban a Mark of Silver and no more. Roger de Valoniis confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and the Monks of St. Albans serving God at Binham, all the Lands which his Father Peter had given them, and gave to them besides several other Lands and Tithes. The like was done by others of that Family, and John Bishop of Norwich.

St. MARY de PRATO, near St. Albans.

THIS was a small Nunnery given, with certain Lands, by Garinus Abbot of St. Albans, for the maintenance of Leprous Nuns, Confirm'd by King John, in the fifth year of his Reign.

36 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

SOPEWELL, in Hertfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

ABout the year 1140. two religious Women led a solitary life in a small Habitation made of Boughs of Trees near a Wood called Eiwoda, who being taken notice of for their austerities and pious Lives, Gaufridus the sixteenth Abbot of St. Albans, built there for them a Cell, gave them the Vail of Nuns, and constituted their way of living according to the Rule of St. Benedict. He also endow'd the House with Possessions and Rents, and assigned them a Cemitery, in which none were to be Buried but the Virgins of the House, whose number was not to exceed thirteen.

Henry de Albaneio and Cecilia his Wife, and several of their Descendants, were great Benefactors to this Cell of St. Mary of Sopewell; and so was Richard de Tany.

Michael Abbot of St. Albans, made and publisht here in his Visitation, Anno Dom. 1338. certain good Rules and Orders to be observed by the Nuns of this House: among others, that the Door that goes into the Garden, and that of the Parlour, should not be open'd till the Bell sounds to the ninth hour, and that all the year they should be shut up at night when the Abby-Bell sounds the Coverfeu, etc.

[Valued at 40 l. 7s. 10d. per Annum.]

MERGATE, in Bedfordshire, a Cell of St. Albans.

IN the time of Gaufridus Abbot of St. Albans, one Roger a Monk, of that Abby, became a Hermite in a Hermitage between St. Albans and Dunstable, where he lived in a most austere manner, with the reputation of great Sanctity; at the same time Christina a Virgin renouncing the World became an Anchoress at the same place, yet the said Roger never saw her face, tho' they lived together four years. Roger died and was buried in the Abby-Church of St. Albans; but Christina surviving, became of so great note for her Sanctity, that the abovesaid Gaufridus, built here from the Foundation a Monastery for Nuns, and endow'd the same with Revenues, of which House Christina became the first Prioress. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 872.

St. NICHOLAS, Priory, at Exeter, a Cell of Battel Abby.

THIS Church formerly dedicated to St. Olive King and Martyr, was by King William Rufus given to the Monks of Battel-Abby, for a Cell; and by them new dedicated to St. Nicholas. King William Rufus, King Henry the I. and King John, conferr'd many Lands and Liberties upon this House.

[Valued at 147 l. 12s. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 37

MALLINGE, in Kent.

KING Edmund gave certain Lands in Mallinges to the Monastery of St. Andrew the Apostle, which afterwards was by Gundulfus Bishop of Rochester, converted to an Abby of Nuns here, dedicated to St. Mary; to which King Henry the I. and King John, and Anselme Archbishop of Canterbury, were also Benefactors.

[Valued at 218 l. 4s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

TUTBURY, in Staffordshire.

HEnry de Ferariis built the Church and Monastery, to the honour of the blessed Virgin, at his Castle of Tutbury, which by the Grant and Licence of King William Rufus, he endow'd with divers Lands and Tithes. Earl Robert de Ferariis the younger, Grandson of the Founder, was a great Benefactor, and so were many others whose names, with the parcells by them given, may be seen in the Monasticon at large.

John Duke of Lancaster, being Lord of the Honour and Castle of Tutbury, granted his Letters Pattents to the King of the Minstalls in Tutbury, impowering him and his Successors, to arrest all Minstralls within the said Honour and Franchise who refuse to do their service of minstrallsie on the Feast of the assumption of our Lady yearly, and constrain them to it, according to Custom. Dated in the 4 Rich. 2.

There is also another Custom of the Place, that the Stage-players who come to Matins on the Feast of the Assumption, should have from the Prior of Tutbury a Bull in case they can catch him before he gets over the River there, or else the Prior is to give them 40d. in mony. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 873.

EYE, in Suffolk.

Robert Malet to whom King William the Conqueror had given the honour of Eye, with the assent of that King, built a Monastery there, and to it gave the Church dedicated to St. Peter, in Eye, with a great quantity of Lands and Churches, with Liberties and Franchises, to hold as freely as King William gave them to him. In the year 1138. King Steven confirm'd to the Monks here, all their Lands and Liberties, with a formal Curse to the Violators. The like Confirmation from William Earl of Boloign that King's eldest Son. This House was a Cell to the Abby of Bernay in Normandy, so that neither the Prior nor any Monk could be placed here without the assent of the Abbot of Bernay; neither upon the death of the Prior here, could the Founder, or his Heirs or Successors, Patrons of this Priory, meddle with, or receive any profit from the Goods and Possessions of this House during the vacancy; but only, in sign of Dominion, he used to place a Porter at the Gate of the Priory, who during the Vacation was maintain'd out of the Revenues of the House, and at the Instalment of the next Prior used to receive for his Fee the Sum of 5s. for an Ox.

38 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

In the 8th. year of King Richard the II. the Estate of this Priory being then seiz'd into the King's hands because of his Wars with France, the Prior and Covent complain'd that they were extreamly impoverished by Foreign Exactions, so that the Revenues of this House could hardly maintain the Prior and three or four Monks; that King therefore by his Letters Patents, at their Petition and Request, discharged them for ever of their Foreign Subjection to the Abby of Bernay, and made them a Prior and Covent of themselves independent, like other English Priories.

[Valued at 161 l. 2s. 3d.  per Annum.]

HELENSTOW, in Barkshire.

JUdith Countess of Huntington, Wife of Earl Waltheof, built a Church and Monastery here for Nuns; and dedicated it to the holy Trinity, St. Mary, and St. Helen. She and others endow'd it with divers Lands; all which were afterwards confirm'd to the Nuns here by King Henry the II. together with large Priviledges and Exemptions.

PENWORTHAM, in Lancashire, a Cell of Evesham.

WArinus Bussell, and Richard Bussell his Son, gave the Church at Penwortham, and with it divers Lands, to the Abby of Evesham, for a Cell of that Abby. All which was confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and to the Monks serving God in Penvercham, by Hugh Bussell, Grandson of the foresaid Warinus, in pure and perpetual Alms. This was in the Reign of King William the Conqueror,

[Valued at 29 l. 18s. 7d. per Annum.]

KILBURN, in Middlesex, a Cell of Westm.

IN the Reign of King Henry the I. Herebertus Abbot of Westminster, Osbert de Clara, Prior, and the whole Convent of Westminster, gave a Hermitage at Kilburn to three Maids Emma, Gunilda, and Christina, for a Nunnery; and endow'd the same with Lands and Rents. Gilbert Bishop of London gave the Jurisdiction of this Cell of Kilburn to the said Abbot and his Successors, exempting it from the Juriadiction of the Bishop of London for ever. But new Contests arising about this House between the Bishop of London and Abbot of Westminster, they came to an Agreement in the year 1131. That the Bishop might visit the Nunnery to preach to them, and to hear their Confessions, but without exacting any Procurations; and that the Government of the House placing and displacing the Abbess and Nuns, should belong to the Abbot, as a Cell of his House, etc.

[Valued at 74 l. 7s. 11d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 39

HURLEY, in Barkshire, a Cell of Westminster.

GOdefridus de Magnavilla gave to God, and St. Peter and to the Church of Westminster, and St. Mary of Hurley the Town of Hurley, with divers other Lands and Tithes, for the Maintenance of a Convent of Monks to serve God in the said Church for ever. All which was confirm'd to the Priors and Monks of Hurley by William Bishop of London. In the year 1158. Godefridus Prior of Hurley and his Covent made an exchange, with Absolon abbot of Walden, of some of their Revenues.

[Valued at 121 l. 18s. 5d. per Annum.]

MALVERNE, in Worcestershire, a Cell of Westminster.

IN the eighteenth year of William the Conqueror, one Aldwine a Hermit and his Brethren began the Monastery here. King William the Conqueror and others gave Lands and Revenues to this House, but more especially King Henry the first who by his Charter dated in the year 1127. granted and confirm'd to them many Lands and great Liberties and Immunities. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 876.

[Valued at 98 l. 10s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

AUCOT, in Warwickshire, a Cell of Malverne-magna.

William Burdet gave all his Land in Aucot to God and St. Mary of Malverne and to the Monks there, in the year 1159. From among which Monks he was to have, by agreement betwixt him and Roger, Prior of that House, a certain number for the Institution of a Monastery here. The Prior of which House was to be constituted by the Prior of Malverne, by and with the advice of the Abbot of Westminster.

[Valued at 28 l. 6s. 2d. per Annum.]

SUDBURY, in Suffolk, a Cell of Westminster.

KING Edward the III. in the thirty fifth year of his Reign, granted his License to Richard Roke of Westminster, to settle certain Land in Sudbury and Holgate upon the Abbot and Convent of Westminster, for the relief of their poor Cell of St. Bartholomew near Sudbury.

St. NEOTS, in Huntingtonshire.

SAint Neot was Son of King Adulphus and Brother of King Alured, who founded the University of Oxford. He was a Monk at Neotestoke, in Cornwall, and from thence his Body was translated to Anulphesbury, in Huntingtonshire, where Earl Elfrid converted his Palace into a Monastery of black Monks. Which being afterwards spoild and burnt down by the

40 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

Danes was in the Reign of King Henry the I. Anno Dom. 1113. re-edified by Rohesia Wiie of Richard Son of Earl Gislibert; about which time it was given as a Cell to the Abby of Bec in Normandy. The foresaid Lady and divers others gave Lands and Revenues to the Monks of Bec serving God at St. Neots. It appears by the Bull of Pope Celestine, directed to the Bishop of Lincoln, that the Prior and Convent of St. Neots, being their House was situated on a famous and great Road, did use to bestow meat and drink on all Travellers who desired it, and to this only use they did appropriate certain Rents and Pensions which they received yearly from the Churches of Eynesbury and Totney.

In the Reigns of Henry the IV. and Henry the V. This Monastery was discharg'd of its Foreign Subjection to the Abby of Bec, and made an English Priory. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 876.

[Valued at 241 l. 11s. 4d. q. per Annum.]

SELBY, in Yorkshire.

KING William the Conqueror founded the Abby here for Benedictine Monks, in honour of our Lord Jesus Christ, and his blessed Mother the Virgin Mary, and St. Germain the Bishop. Which King, and several other persons, did endow it with large Possessions, in particular Guido de Raincourt gave to this Church of St. Germain in Selby his Town of Stamford in Northamptonshire. Thomas Archbishop of York, Gilbert Tisen chid Standard-bearer of England, Gaulerannus Earl of Mellent, Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln and Constable of Chester, etc. gave other Lands and great Liberties. All which King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Monks here. Also King Edward the III. did in the second year of his Reign, confirm to them all their Liberties and Exemptions, whereupon in the twenty second of that King, they were excused from paying to the King, in any of their Lands purchased before the abovesaid second year, any aid for knighting his eldest Son, etc.

[Vaued at 729 l. 12s. 10d. q. per Annum.]

SHREWSBURY, in Shropshire.

IN the year 1083. Roger Earl of Montgomery built here a Monastery in honour of St. Peter. To this House he gave great Possessions, and after his Example other Barons and Knights of that County did the like. After the death of the said Roger, Hugh his Son and Heir gave other Lands and great Liberties and Immunities, with a heavy Curse to the Violaters. The like did King Henry the I. and King Steven, confirming their said Liberties in so large a manner that nothing could be added to them. Other principal Benefactors were Matilda de Lungespe Daughter and Heir of Walter de Clifford, Walchelinus Maminot, Willielmus Peverell, and Richard Fitz-Allen Earl of Arundel, etc. All whose Guifts and Benefactions were confirm'd to the Abbot and monks of this House by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign.

[Valued at 132 l. 4s. 10d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 41

St. MARY'S, at York.

THE History of the Foundation of this Abby was writ by Stephen who had been Abbot of Whitby, and was after that made the first Abbot of this House. In which the most observable matters are as follows,

Alan Son of Eudo Earl of Brittain, having built a Church adjoyning to the City of York in honour of St. Olave, qave it to the aforesaid Stephen and his Companions, with four Acres of Land, thereon to craft a Monastery. This was about the year 1088. in the Reign of King William the Conqueror. Who dying, his Son and Successor King William Rufus, gave them Land whereon to build a larger Church, and gave to the Monastery, divers Lands, Liberties, and Exemptions. Also Earl Alan their first Founder gave them the adjoyning Suburbs lying without the City of York, to hold freely forever. And gave the Advowson of this Abby to the King, that so he might be the Defendor and Patron of it for the future. Thomas Archbishop of York claim'd the four Acres of Land on which this Abby was built as belonging to him, and was a continual vexation to the Monks, till King William Rufus gave him the Church of St. Steven's in York, in exchange and full satisfaction.

When King William Rufus, seeing the Old Church to be too strait, laid the Foundation of a new one, he changed the name of St. Olave, and gave it the name of St. Mary.

King Henry the II. granted to this Abby very great Liberties and Franchises, the same as are enjoy'd by St. Peters of York, and St. John of Beverley. And confirmed to them all their Lands and Revenues given them by their several Benefactors amounting to a very great number, some of the principal of whom were King William the I. and II. King Henry the I. Alan Earl of Britaign, Odo Earl of Campania, Berengerius de Todenei, Willielmus Peverel, Petrus de Ros, Robertus de Brus, Ivo Tallebois, Walterus de Daincourt, and Conan Earl of Britaigne, etc.

In the year 1343. William Archbishop of York in his Visitation, questioning by what Right and Title the Abbot and Covent here, did claim and receive the Tithes, Portions, and Pensions, from several places there mention'd (amounting to a very great number) they produced the Bulls of several Popes, and Grants of his Predecessors, Archbishops of York, whereupon they were by the said Archbishop allow'd, and their Title declared good and sufficient.

A List of some of the ABBOTS of St. Mary's at York.

1088 Stephanus Wittebiensia.
1112 Richardus.
1131 Godfridus.
1132 Sauaricus.
1161 Clemens.
1184 Robertus de Harpham.
1189 Robertus de Longo-Campo.
1239 Willielmus Rondele.
1244 Thomas de Warterhill.
1258 Simon de Warwick.
1296 Benedictus de Malton.
1303 Johannes de Gillyngs.
1313 Alanus de Nesse.

Vid. Vol. 3. p. 9.

[Valued at 1550 l. 7s. 0d. q. per Annum.]

42 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

St. BEES, or St. Beges, in Cumberland, a Cell of St. Mary's, at York.

SAint Bega was availed Nun, born in Ireland, she built a small Monastery in Caupland in the furthermost parts of England, not far from Carlile. This Monastery, together with several Lands and Tithes, was afterwards in the Reign of King Henry the I. given to the Abby of St. Mary's at York, by William Meschines, Son of Ranulph, Lord of Caupland, for a Cell to that Abby; which was to send hither a Prior, and at least six Monks to be constantly here resident. To this House, also William Forz Earl of Albemarl was a Benefactor.

[Valued at 145 l. 17s. 2d. per Annum.]

WETHERHAL, in Cumberland; a Cell to St. Mary's at York.

AT the time of the Foundation of St. Mary's at York, Radulph Meschines Earl of Cumberland, gave the Cell of St. Constantine at Wedderhal, to the said Abby of St Mary's; which guift was confirm'd by King William the Conqueror in the last year of his Reign: (Or rather by King William Rufus in the first of his).

Benefactors to this House were David King of Scotland and Earl of Huntington, and his Son Henry Prince of Scotland, with divers others.

Adelwald, (or Athelwulph, who was the first) Bishop of Carlile, confirm'd to the Monks of St. Mary's at York the Churches, and Tithes to them given, in his Diocess. Providing however that the said Monks shall allot a sufficient proportion out of the same for the Priests in the several Churches, and that they should also pay the Synodals.

King William the Conqueror, upon his Conquest of this Kingdom, gave to Ralph de Meschines the County of Cumberland, to his Brother Hugh de Meschines, the County of Chester, and to a third Brother William de Meschines (who founded this House of Wetherhal) all the Land of Copland, lying between Duden and Darwent. Which Great men soon after subdivided, and parcell'd out their respective Territories so given, to certain Barons and Knights their Dependents, viz. Ralph de Meschines enfeofft Hubert de Vaux of the Barony of Gillesland, etc. William de Meschines Lord of Copland enfeofft Waldeuus Son of Cospatrick of all his Land between Cocar and Derwent, etc. These chief Lords reserving from their Feoffees certain services, in like manner as they themselves held their Estates by some services of the King. (Yet were Lands often granted to the Monasteries, to hold free from all services whatsoever, except the Divine Service of Prayers for their Founders, etc.)

And note. That after this manner were Lands and Liberties first derived from the Crown, and Tenures raised in relation to them, since the Norman Conquest.

[Valued at 117 l. 11s. 10d. ob. q. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 45

St MARTINS, at Richmond, a Cell of St. Mary's at York.

WYmar, Sewer to the Earl of Richmund, gave the Chappel of St. Martins at Richmund, and with several Lands, to God and the blessed Mary at York.

Roaldus Grandson of Alan Constable of Richmund, and divers others were Benefactors, and gave Lands and Tithes to God, the Church of St. Mary at York, and Priory of St. Martins near Richmund, and to the Monks there.

In the year 1146. Pope Eugenius the III. confirmed the Cell of St. Martins.

Peter Capell, Rector of the Church of Richmund granted a Pension of 5 l. per Annum to the Monks of St. Mary's at York, and 20 l. of Wax to their Cell of St. Martins of Richmund, yearly.

The several Rents and Revenues of this House; where, and from whom they arise, may be seen ia the Book at large, p. 402, 403.

[Valued at 43 l. 16s. 8d. per Annum.]

ROMBURGH, in Cambridgeshire, a Cell to St. Mary's at York.

ALan (otherwise, as I suppose, called Steven) Earl of Britany and Richmond, gave the Cell of Romburgh to God, St. Mary, and the Monks of the Abby at York; which Gift was confirm'd to them by Everard Bishop of Norwich, and that the Abbot and Convent of St. Marys at York might place and displace the Prior and Monks at their pleasure. The like Confirmations were granted by Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, and Gaufridus Bishop of Ely.

SANTOFT and HENES, in Lincolnshire, Cells of St. Mary's at York.

ROger Moubray gave the Isle called Santoft, and large Possessions with it, for a Cell to the Church of St. Mary's at York, and to the Monks there. And William Earl of Waren gave Henes to the said Church.

HEREFORD Priory, a Cell of St. Peter's at Gloucester.

IN the year 1101. Hugo de Lacy gave the Church of St. Peters at Hereford, which his Father Walter had built from the Foundation, to the Monks of St. Peters at Gloucester, with all the Estate belonging to it, given by his said Father Walter de Lacy, and Confirm'd by King William the Conqueror.

In the Reign of King Edward the great Contests arising in this House between William de Irby who claim'd to be Prior under the Kings Patronage, and Thomas de Burghull who claim'd under another Title; the Estate of the Priory was so wasted and impoverisht betwixt them that there did not remain sufficient to discharge the Works of Piety, for which it was at first built, and the House running to utter ruin; that King

44 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

therefore, to prevent its final deftruction, in the fifteenth year of his Reign, directed his Writ to the Sheriff of Hereford, commanding him to seize the said Priory with all its Possessions as well moveable as immoveable into his hand, and them safely to keep until further Order.

NORWICH, in Norfolk.

THE Church of the holy Trinity in Norwich was founded in the Reign of King William Rufus, Anno Dom. 1096. by Herbert Losenge, who had been Prior of Fischampe in Normandy, then Abbot of Ramsey, and then Bishop of the East-Angles, of which Diocess he fixt the Seat at Norwich, and built this Church for his Cathedral; erecting on the North side of it his own Palace, and on the South-side a Monastery for Monks.

Certain Limits were appointed about this Church and Monastery, within which, Bishop Herbert obtained great Priviledges and Franchise from both Regal and Papal Authority. Notwithstanding which, great Contests arose between the Citizens and the Monks about their Liberties, which continued for many years, and were never perfectly compos'd till the sixth year of King John. The said Bishop Herbert endow'd this Monastery, so founded by him, with large Revenues, as appears by his Deed dated Anno Dom. 1101. King Henry the I. confirm'd his Gift, and also gave them other Lands in the same year. King Henry the II. also made a large Confirmation, of all their Lands and Liberties. Vid. infra p. 1003. and Vol. 3. p. 5.

EWYAS Priory, in Herefordshire.

THIS Priory was founded and endow'd by Harald Lord of Ewyas, Anno Dom. 1100. whose Gift was afterwards confirm'd by Robert his Son, who also gave other Lands; all which was also confirm'd by Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, and John Bishop of Salisbury.

MIDLESBURG, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Whitby.

Robert de Brus and Agnes his Wife, and Adam de Brus their Son gave the Church of St. Hylda in Midlesburg, and with it divers Lands, in perpetual Alms to the Monks of St. Peter and St. Hilda at Whitby, for a Cell of that House, and that certain of those Monks might live and reside here for God's service in the Church of Midlesburg. William Malebiss was also a Benefactor to the Church of St. Hylda at Midlesburg and the Monks there.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 45

HAKENES, in Yorkshire.

IN the Reign of King William Rufus, the Monastery of Whitby being much infested not only by robbers from the Woods on the Land, but also by Pirates from the Sea, who carried from them almost all they had, Serlo de Percy then Prior of that House, and his Monks, applied themselves to William de Percy, Brother of Serlo, and desired of him a place of Refuge at Hakenes; who readily granted them the Church of St. Mary in that Town, which had been built by St. Hilda the Abbess, with License to erect a Monastery there, and in it to remain till they could return in peace to Whitby; which accordingly they did, and remain'd here for some time.

HORSHAM, in Norfolk.

Robert Fitz Walter and Sibill his Wife, returning through France from Rome, where they had been in Pilgrimage, were set upon by Theives, robb'd, and kept in Prison till by their Prayers to Almighty God, and to the holy Virgin St. Faith, they were miraculously deliver'd out of their Confinement. After which they visited in Devotion the Shrine of St. Faith at the Abby of Conches in France, where for the space of twelve days they remain'd, being kindly entertain'd by the Abbot and Convent there. Vowing at their return into England to their own Mannor to built there a Monastery in the Worship of God and St. Faith. Which accordingly they did; endowing the same with Lands, and placing therein two Monks of the Abby of Conches, to which Abby they annext this House as a Cell. Their Deed of Foundation and Endowment, was made in the time of Henry the I. and Herbert Bishop of Norwich, who died 19. H. 1.

Pope Alexander, by his Bull dated in the year 1163. confirm'd to the Monks here all their Lands and Liberties.

In the 14. Rich. 2. this Priory was discharged of its Foreign Subjection to the Abby of Conches, and made an English Priory of it self.

[Valued at 162 l. 16s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

RADINGFEILD, in Suffolk.

THIS was a Priory of Nuns founded to the honour of God and St. Andrew, by Manasses Earl of Gisnensis, and Emme his Wifes Daughter and Heir of William de Arras, and endow'd by them with the Mannor of Radingfeild, etc. late held by the said William de Arras; their Deed bears date 1120.

[Valued at 67 l. 0s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

READING, in Barkshire.

HERE was formerly a Monastery of Nuns. But that having been for many years destroyed, King Henry the I. Anno Dom. 1126.

46 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

built here a most noble Abby for Monks, and dedicated it in honour of the Virgin Mary and St. John Baptist, and endow'd it with great Possessions and Franchises as may be seen in his Charter dated 1125. all which was confirm'd by King Hen. 2.

Hugh Abbot of Reading and his Covent, reciting by their Deed, that King Henry the I. had erected that Abby for the maintenance of Monks there devoutely and religiously serving God, for the receit of Strangers and Travellers, but chiefly Christ's poor People, they therefore did erect an Hospital without the Gate of the Abby there, to maintain twenty six poor People; and to the maintenance of Strangers passing that way they gave the profits of their Mill at Leominstre. Also Aucherius Abbot of Reading, built near this Abby a House for Lepers, which was call'd St. Mary Magdalens, alloting for their sustenance sufficient of all things, as well as other matters. If any Brother of this House were guilty of Adultery, or of striking his Brother in Pride, Anger, or Hatred, he was to be expell'd the House; none were to go abroad without a Companion; what Charity happens to be given to any one, to be common to all; these and several others were the Rules observed in the Lepers House of St. Mary Magdalen.

[Valued at 1938 l. 14s. 3d. ob. q. per Annum.]

LEOMINSTER, in Herefordshire, a Cell to Reading.

HERE was formerly a Nunnery built by Merwald one of the Kings of Mercia; but that having been long destroy'd by the Danes, King Henry the I. when he built the Abby of Reading, gave them also Leominster, with all the Estate belonging to it, and those Monks made it a Cell of their Abby. It was confirm'd to them by Richard and Hugh Bishops of Hereford.

RINDELGROS, in Scotland, a Cell to Reading.

DAvid, King of Scotland gave this Town to the Abbot and Covent of Reading, to have and enjoy as freely and quiety as any Abby in his Kingdom enjoy their Estates. With a Provision that if he or his Successors shall add to this Donation sufficient wherewith to maintain a Covent here, that then the said Abbot of Reading should send a Covent hither.

MAY, in Scotland, a Cell to Reading.

THIS Priory was founded by David King of Scotland, and endow'd with several Lands in Scotland, by the said David, and Malcolm and William successively Kings of Scotland.

Vol. I. BENEDICTINES. 47

SHIRBURN, in Dorsetshire.

THE Bishops Seat which is now at Salisbury, did of old time, for many years, remain at Shirburn; but since that time Monks were placed here instead of secular Canons. The Abby Church here, dedicated to our lady, was in the time of Abbot Bradeford, set on fire, and a great part burnt, in a Dissention which happened between the Townesmen and the Monks; but the Townesmen were made to contribute to the Reparation. King Hen. 2. granted and confirm'd certain Lands to this Abby.

[Valued at 682 l. 14s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

CADWELLI, in the Diocess of St. David's, in Wales, a Cell to Shirburn.

THIS Priory of Cadwelli was given to the Church of St. Mary's of Shirburn, and to Thurstan Prior there and his Successors, by Roger Bishop of Salisbury. Maurice of London and others were Benefactors. Pope Alexander, by his Bull dated 1163. confirm'd to the Abby of Shirburn its Lands and Revenues, among others the Parish Church of St. Mary of Shirburn, which the Abbot of that Abby held as a Prebend of the Church of Salisbury, also the Church of St. Mary of Cadwelli with all the Chappels, and Tithes thereunto belonging, etc. all which Grants and Deeds were ratified, approved, and confirm'd, and also exemplified by David Bishop of St. David's, Anno Dom. 1305.

[Valued at 29 l. 10s. per Annum.]

CARHOW, in Norfolk.

THIS was a Nunnery founded and endow'd by King Steven near the City of Norwich. King John in the first year of his Reign granted to the Nuns here a Fair, to be held yearly at the Nativity of our Lady, with the like Liberties as the Monks enjoy in their Fair at Norwich. King Henry the III. in the thirteenth year of his Reign confirmed their Estate.

[Valued at 64 l. 16s. 6d. q. per Annum.]

GRENDALE, in Yorkshire.

AVicia Prioress of the Covent of Nuns in the Church of St. Mary of Grendale, granted in fee farm to Ralf Prior, and to the Convent of Giseburn, certain Lands which had been to the said Nuns given by Eugeramus de Bovington; to hold at the yearly Rent of four Quarters of Wheat yearly, to be paid half at the Feast of St. Martins in Winter, and half at Whitsontide. Richard de Percy, then Patron of this Priory, granted the Advowson thereof to Richard Malebisse and his Heirs for ever, yeilding, in lieu of all Service, one pound of Incense yearly at the Feast of Pentecost, which by the same Deed he assigned to be paid to the said Priory.

48 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

CLERKENWELL, in Middlesex.

JOrdanus, Son of Radulfus, Son of Brian, gave to God, St. Mary, and all Saints, and to Robert the Chaplain, in Alms, fourteen Acres of Land lying near the Clerks-well (fons clerkorum) freed and discharged from all Claims of the Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem; this he gave to the said Robert, to the end that he might there build a religious House, such as he thought fit for God's service. Which being built and made a Nunnery, Matilda de Ros, Daughter of Richard Canville, Girard de Canvill, Henry de Essex, and others were Benefactors; whose Gifts were confirm'd by Richard Bishop of London, Anno Dom. 1194. and by the Heirs General of the Founder, who also granted other Lands and Possessions lying round the Nunnery. All which Lands and Possessions were confirm'd to the Church of St. Mary de Fonte Clericorum adjoyning to London, and the Nuns there by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 262 l. 19s. per Annum.]

WROXHALL, in Warwickshire.

HUgh Lord of Wroxhall and Hatton, being taken Prisoner at the holy War (in Palestine) and detain'd in Chains there, was by miracle removed from thence and set down in his own Estate at Wroxhall, whereupon he built a Nunnery here for Benedictine Nuns, in honour of God and St. Leonard, to whom he had made his Prayers when in distress; and made his two Daughters Nuns here.

The Names of the Prioresses.

1 Ernborow.
2 Helin.
3 Sabin.
4 Helin.
5 Mawd.
6 Emme.
7 Mawd.
8 Cecelie.
9 Ide.
10 Amis Abtot.
11 Annis.
12 Sibill Abtot. 1284.

King Henry the II. and several others were Benefactors, all whose Gifts were confirm'd to this House in the first of King Edward the III.

[Valued at 72 l. 15s. 6d. per Annum.]

COLNE, in Essex, a Cell to Abington.

ALbericus de Veer, the Kings Chamberlain, gave and confirm'd to God and St. Mary, and to the Monks of Abington at Coln, serving God in the Church of St. Andrew there, divers Land and Revenues. King Henry the I. in the year 1111. authorized and confirm'd the Subjection of this Church to that of Abington, and all the Estate given unto it by the said Albericus de Veer and others of his Family. Which Albericus, before his death, became a Monk in this House, and dying, was here buried; as were also his Sons. In the year 1311. a Composition and Agreement, was made between Richard Abbot of Abington, and John de Campeden Prior of Colun, and their several Convents, containing that the Prior and Covent of Coln might choose and admit their own Monks

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 49

from what parts they please, and that no Monks should be sent thither from the Convent of Abyndon; that the Convent of Coln might choose their own Prior, who was to be presented to, and allow'd by the Abbot of Abyndon; saving to the Abbot the right of visiting the said Priory of Coln. In consideration of which Liberty the Monks of Coln did with the Consent of Robert de Veer Earl of Oxford their Patron, grant to the Abbot of Abyndon thdr Lordship of Kensington. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 877.

[Valued at 156 l. 12s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

CANEWELL, in Staffordshire.

GEva Daughter of Hugh Earl of Chester, and Wife of Geoffrey Ridell, founded the Church in honour of St. Mary, and St. Giles, and All Saints in Canewell, for Monks; and, with the grant and allowance of her Heirs Jeoffrey Ridell, and Ralph Basset, endow'd it with divers Lands. The said Ralph Bisset was a Benefactor to this House, and so was Waleran Earl of Warwick.

FARWELL, in Staffordshire.

ROger Bishop of Chester (whose Seat was since translated to Lichfield) gave the Church of St. Mary at Faurwelle to Nuns and devout Women; this he did at the request of three Hermits inhabiting at Faurwelle; and endow'd the same with Lands, to hold as freely as he himself did from God and the King; all which King Henry the II. confirm'd to the said Nuns, and also give them of his own Charity divers other Lands and Liberties.

PINLEY, in Warwickshire.

R de Pilardinton, gave this place to be a Nunnery, which was confirm'd to the Nuns here by Alured Bishop of Worcester, and by Simon and John his Predecessors. John Son of Jeoffrey de Langele gave to God and St. Mary of Pinley and the Nuns there, his Brother Robert de Langely, his Homage, and Service, and Rent of 6d. for the maintenance of our Ladies Lamp at Pinley (ad Lumen beatae Mariae de Pineleia).

[Valued at 23 l. 5s. 11d. per Annum.]

STRATFORD Priory.

THE Nunnery here dedicated to St. Leonard, was founded and endowed by Chistiana de Sumeri, and her Son; as seems by the Confirmation of King Steven. King Richard the I. did confirm other Lands to it, given by Galiena and her Son Bartholmew de Daumartin, Patrons of the House.

50 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

FRESTONE in Lincolnshire, a Cell of Croyland.

ALan de Creun, with Muriel his Wife, and Maurice his Son gave the Church of St. James of Frestone, with several Lands and Tithes, to be Cell to the Abby of Croyland. From which Creun, or Croune, descended the Family of Pedwaryn, who became Heirs of the Founder, the Male Line ceasing.

St. DOGMELS, in Pembrokeshire, (Cella Caenobii Tyronensis).

THese Monks were Benedictines of the same Order with those of St. Martins at Tours. The Priory here was founded by Martin de Turribus, a Norman who first Conquered the Country hereabouts call'd Kames, or Kamish. Robert the Son of this Martin, endow'd it with Lands, confirm'd to it by King Henry the I.

[Valued at 87 l. 8s. 6d. per Annum.]

WALDEN Abby, in Essex.

THE Abby at Walden was founded in the year 1136. by Gaufridus de Mandeville Earl of Essex. He was Grandson of Jeoffrey who came into England with the Norman Conqueror, and was the most signal note in his Army for his great Performances. From the noble Founder of this Abby (who died in the year 1144) descended the illustrious Family of the Bohuns Earls of Hereford, Essex, and Northampton.

This Abby was dedicated to the honour of the blessed Mary, and St. James the Apostle.

The Family of Bohuns were great Benefactors to this Abby, and most of them buried here.

This Abby was built on the West-side of the Town and adjoyning to the Highway, which place was chosen as more proper for the relief of Travellers, and for Hospitality.

After the death of the Founder, Rohesia his Widow built a Nunnery at Chinksand, to which she did all good Offices, and for the sake of that House, became very unkind to this of her Husbands Foundation.

William de Mandevilla second Son of the Founder, while Jeoffrey his elder Brother lived, led a military life in Flanders with Philip Earl of that Country, but upon his Brother's death without issue, he return'd into England, and inherited his Estate. Soon after which he made a Pilgrimage to Jerusalem and visited the holy Places, from whence being return'd into England he visited this House, and was here received with great Ceremony, where he presented at the Altar several Relicks which he had purchased in the holy Land, and became a great Benefactor to this House, giving them by his Testament the Moiety of his Lordship of Walden, etc., and died in Normandy without issue. After whose decease this Barony came by his Heirs General to one Jeffrey Fitz-Peter, who disseiz'd the Monks of what Earl William had given them, and kept the Estate from them a great while till after King John's Coronation, being made Earl of Essex, he restored part of their Lands again, and confirm'd them to the Monks here. This

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 51

Jeffrey Filius Petri was very vexatious to this Abby, the manner and particulars may be seen in the Book at large. Yet did, Gaufridus de Mandavilla, the first Founders Deed of Foundation contain a heavy Curse to any of his Successors or Tenants who should vex or disturb these Monks in any of their Possessions, or alienate or diminish the same. The Founders Endowment was confirm'd by several of his Descendents; also by King Steven, and King Henry the II. And King Edward the III. in the seventeeth year of his Reign Licened William de Bohun Earl of Northampton to give and annext the Priory of Bereden in Essex as a Cell to this Abby.

[Valued at 372 l. 18s. 1d. per Annum.]

BROMFEILD, in Shropshire.

ANno Dom. 1155. The Canons of Bromfeild, by the Authority of Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, gave their Church of Bromfeild to the Abby of St. Peters at Gloucester.

King Henry the II. confirm'd all the Estate belonging to the Church of St. Mary of Bromfeild, to the Prior and Monks there serving God, to hold of him and his Heirs in perpetual Alms. The like did King Henry the III.

BRETFORD, in Warwickshire.

GAufridus Camerarius de Clintona gave certain Lands in this Lordship to one Noemi a Nun, for the erecting a Cell of Nuns here.

Afterwards, at the request of the said Gaufridus de Clinton, the Nuns here, being only two, viz. Seburc and Noeumi, gave their House and Estate here to the Canons of Killingworth.

TALLACH, in the Diocess of St. David's in Wales.

THE Abby here, dedicated to God, St Mary and St. John Baptist, was founded by Resus the younger Son of Resus the younger, of the Family of the Princes of South-wales, and by him, and others endow'd with many Lands, the particulars may be seen in the Monasticon at large, fol. 466, 467. all which was confirm'd to this House by King Edward the II. in the seventeenth year of his Reign, and by King Edward the III. in the fifth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 136 l. 9s. 11d. per Annum.]

BLITHBURY Priory, in Staffordshire.

HUgh Malvisin gave Blytheburgh to Monks and Nuns there dwelling, for the service of God and St. Giles, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms. Which Estate tho' for a while taken away by William Malvisin, Son of the Founder Hugh, yet it was soon restored again.

55 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

EDWARDSTON, in Suffolk, a Cell to Abbington.

HUbertus de Monte Canesi Lord of the Town of Edwardston in Suffolk gave the Church there, to the Monks of Abbendon, to be a Cell of that House, and confirm'd his Gift in the fifteenth year of Henry the I. Which was also ratified by that King, Anno Dom. 1115.

DEPING, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to Thorney.

BAldwinus Wac gave the Church of St. James in Deping with divers Lands belonging to it, to God, St. Mary, and the Church of Thorney, which was confirm'd by his Son and Grandson: and also by Pope Innocent the III. in the first year of his Pontificate (1198).

ALCESTER, in Warwickshire.

IN the year 1140. Radulfus Pincerna (or Boteler) founded this Monastery (then called from its Situation St. Mary's of the Isle) and made Robert a Monk of Worcester the first Abbot here. At which time it was agreed between the two Houses, viz. The Abby of Worcester, and this, that there should be a constant Love and Brotherhood betwixt them, and that upon the death of the Abbot here, another should be chosen indifferently out of either House; the said Founder endow'd this Monastery with divers Lands ordaining that the Abbot should not spend any of the Revenues to enrich his secular kindred, but upon the Poor and Travellers. Robert, Earl of Leicester (of whom this Estate was holden by the foresaid Founder) confirm'd the same to the Monks here, and granted to them divers Liberties. The like did King Steven. King Henry the II. confirm'd to them all their Lands by their several Benefactors given, and also granted them full power to choose their own Abbot from among themselves, in their Convent. King Edward the IV. in the fifth year of his Reign, seeing the Estate of this Monastery to run to decay, it being so far wasted that it was not sufficient to maintain any Monks, but the Abbot only, granted this House and what Estate it had left, to the Abby of Evesham, to which he annext it for ever; so that from that time it became a Cell of that Abby.

[Valued at 65 l. 7s. 11d. per Annum.]

LINGEBROOK Priory, in Herefordshire.

IT seems by an Inquisition taken 24. Edw, 3. that Adam Esgar Clerk, was a Benefactor to the Monastery of Nuns here, and founded an Anniversary for William de Power.

[Valued at 22 l. 17s. 8d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 53

NUNKELLING, in Yorkshire.

AGnes de Archis gave the Church here and divers Lands to God, St. Mary, and St. Helen, and to the Nuns of Killing, in pure and free Alms. The Nuns Estate here was afterwards confirm'd by Richard de Sancto Quintino, and William de Fortibus Earl of Albemarle, and by Aeliz de Sancto Quintino Daughter of the foresaid Agnes, who also gave other Lands, and lastly by the Archbishops of York.

[Valued at 55 l. 15s. 5d. per Annum.]

SANDWELL, in Staffordshire.

William Son of Guido de Offney founded a Hermitage in Bromwich, near the Well call'd Sandwell for a Habitation of Monks, and endow'd the same with divers Lands lying about the same. Which was confirm'd to the said Monks by Gervais Paganellus Lord of the honour of Dudley, of which Barony the Lands were holden.

MONKETON, in Yorkshire.

William de Arches and Juetta his Wife founded a Nunnery here, of which their Daughter Matilda was a Nun, endowing the same with divers Lands. All which was confirm'd to the said Nunnery by Henry Murdac Bishop of York. (He died 1153).

[Valued at 75 l. 12s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

HALISTANE, in Northumberland.

Richard Bishop of Durham, in the year 1311. united the Churches of Crossanet, and Harbottell, to the Church of Halistan and the Nunnery there, and gave the Patronage of the same to Richard de Umframvill Patron of the said Nunnery. King Henry the III. in the thirty ninth year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Prioress and Nuns of Halystan, tbe Lands given to them by Alice de Alneto, and Roger Bertram.

[Valued at 11 l. 5s. 7d. per Annum.]

DUNSTER, in Somersetshire.

THE Monastery of Monks here, dedicated to the honour of St. George, was founded and endowed with sundry Lands and Revenues by the Ancestors of John de Mooun Lord of Dunsterre, which John did, in the fifteenth year of King Edward the III. ratifie and confirm to the Monks here all his Ancestors Donations.

[Valued at 37 l. 4s. 8d. per Annum.]

54 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

MARGAN Abby, in Wales.

THIS Abby was founded by Robert Earl of Gloucester in the year 1147. King John in the sixth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Church of St. Mary's of Margan, and the Monks there, all the Lands and Estate given to them by the said Robert and several others.

[Vaued at 181 l. 7s. 4d. per Annum.]

BLACKBURGH, in Norfolk.

ROger de Scales and Muriell his Wife gave to God, St. Mary, and St. Catherine, and to the Brethren serving them in this place, called Shiplade, other wise Blackbergh, divers Lands and Possessions. The same Roger by an other Deed, gave the same Lands and others to the Sisters here serving God. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 879.

[Valued at 42 l. 6s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

HENWOOD, in Warwickshire.

KEtelbernus de Langedona, gave to God, and St. Margeret the Virgin, and to the Nuns at Eastwell (so was this Monastery then called by reason of its situation) part of his Demeans of Langedon in which Lordship this Nunnery stood, with divers other Lands and Liberties, to hold as freely as he himself held them of his chief Lord Hugh of Arden. Pope Innocent in the first year of his Pontificate incorporated, annext, and united to this Nunnery of Henwood divers Churches given to the same by King Rich. II. and King Henry the IV.

[Valued at 21 l. 2s. 0d. ob. per Annum.]

St. RADEGUNDS, adjoyning to Cambridge.

KING Steven confirm'd to the Church and Nuns of St. Mary of Cambridge certain Lands which William a Monk and Goldsmith gave them; and also other Lands given them by Countess Constance Wife of his Son Eustace. It was found by Inquisition taken at Cambridge, 3. Edw. 1. that the Prioress and Nuns of St. Radegund at Cambridge hold a certain piece of Ground called Greencroft, containing ten Acres on which their Church and House is founded, which was given for that purpose by Malcolme King of Scotland: and that Nigellus and Eustachius Bishops of Ely had been Benefactors to this Nunnery.

LANGLEY, in Leicestershire.

THE Nunnery of St. Mary's of Langly was founded by William Pantulphe and Burgia his Wife, from whom descended Robert de Tatesale Patron of this Priory 5. H. 3. The Nuns here upon the death of their

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 55

Prioress, had power to choose another without asking leave of their Patron, who did use during the time of such Vacation to appoint a Boy (unum Garcionem) with a white Wand to keep the Gate of the Nunnery, for which he was to have his Diet there.

[Valued at 29 l. 7s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

SANDFORD, in Barkshire.

KING Edward the I. in the 21st. year of his Reign granted to the Prior and Convent of Sandelford, free Warren in their Demeans. Saiberus de Sancto Andrea granted to God, and the Church of St. Nicholas of Sandford, and to the Nuns there, a Rent of Five Shillings per Annum in his Town of Littlemore. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 13.

SETON, in Cumberland.

HEnry Duke of Lancaster, Earl of Derby, Lincoln and Leicester, being inform'd that the Revenues of this Priory were so small that they could not maintain the Prioress and Nuns, gave and annext to this House, the Hospital of St. Leonard's in Lancaster, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms. Which Hospital was first founded by King John for a Master, a Chaplain, and nine poor People, three of which to be Lepers, and the rest found.

[Valued at 12 l. 12s. ob. per Annum.]

ANKERWIK, in Buckinghamshire.

Gilbert and Richard Mintfichet, Knights, founded a Nunnery here, and endow'd it with Lands. King Henry the III. in the one and fortieth year of his Reign confirm'd their Estate given by many Benefactors, whose Names, and Parcels given are exprest in his Charter.

[Valued at 32 l. 0s. 2d. per Annum.]

WINTENEY, in Hampshire.

RIchard, Son of Richard de Hereard endowed the Nunnery here built to God, the blessed Mary, St. Mary Magdalen, and All Saints with divers Lands, which King Edward the I. confirm'd.

[Valued at 43 l. 3s. per Annum.]

SNELLESHALL, in Buckinghamshire.

RAlph Martell, and others, gave to the Prior and Monks here serving God in the Church of St. Leonard, at Snelleshall, divers Lands, which were confirm'd to them by King Henry the III.

[Valued at 18 l. 1s. 11d. per Annum.]

56 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

BIRKENED, in Cheshire.

HAmo de Massie endow'd the Church of St. Mary and St. James here with Lands, and granted and confirm'd to the Prior and Monks, and their Successors, power and liberty to choose their own Prior upon any vacancy, from among themselves, according as Pope Alexander had granted to them.

[Valued at 90 l. 13s. per Annum.]

MARRIGG, in Yorkshire.

TO the Nuns here serving God, Roger de Asco, Conan de Asch, and many others, among the rest Conan Duke of Britanny and Richmond were great Benefactors; giving divers Lands and Liberties, all which were recited and confirm'd by the Charter of King Edward the III. in the twenty second year of his Reign.

[Valued at 48 l. 18s. 3d. per Annum.]

STYKESWOULD, in Lincolnshire.

IT appear'd by Inquisition taken in the Reign of King Edward the I. that the Master and Nuns of Stikeswold held several Lands of the Gift of Lucy Mother of Ranulf Earl of Chester, and others. And that they had been so held for the space of one hundred years.

[Valued at 114 l. 5s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

STODELY, in Oxfordshire.

BErnard de Sancto Walerico, and Thomas de Sancto Walrico his Son endow'd a Nunnery here, and gave power to the Nuns upon the vacancy of the Prioress to choose another with the assent of the Patron or his Steward. Thomas de S. Walerico lived in the time of King John 1207. Richard King of the Romans, and Edmund Earl of Cornwall, and Godfrey de Crancumbe were Benefactors. Vid. Vol. 3. p 13.

[Valued at 82 l. 4s. 4d. q. per Annum.]

KIRKLEY, in Yorkshire.

REinerus Flandrensis, gave divers Lands to the Nuns here, which were confirm'd to them by William Earl of Warren in pure and perpetual Alms. They had also other Lands from other Benefactors, all which were confirm'd by King Henry the III. in the twentieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 19 l. 8s. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 57

STANFORD, in Lincolnshire.

WIlliam Abbot of Peterborough, in the Reign of King Henry the II. founded at Stanford a Priory of Nuns in honour of God and St. Michael, he built their Church, and placed there forty Nuns. Saving to himself and Successors, Abbots of Peterburgh, the placing of the Prioress, etc., reserving also a Rent of half a Mark yearly to be paid to the Church of Peterburgh.

William de Humet gave a Rent of ten Marks per Annum to the Cistercian Monks in Stanford, which was confirm'd to them by King John in the sixteenth year of his Reign. Lucy Wife of the said William gave certain Rents to the Nuns of St. Michaels at Stanford.

The Prioress and Nuns here did by their Act and Deed acknowledge and promise fidelity and obedience to the Abbot and Convent of Peterborough; that the Prior or Curator of their Monastery might be placed and displaced by the said Abbot and Convent; that upon the death of the Prioress, no Election of another should be made without the Abbots License; and that the admitting of the Nuns into the said House should be wholly in the power of the said Abbot; also that the said Nunnery should pay a yearly Pension of a Mark of Silver to the said Abby of Peterburgh for the buying of Books. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 880.

[Valued at 65 l. 19s. 9d. per Annum.]

WYRTHORP, in Northamptonshire.

IN the 28th. of Edw. 3. Thomas de Holland and Joan his Wife (the Kings Kinswoman) were Patrons of a Nunnery at Wyrthorp, at which time this House was so impoverished and decayed, by reason of the Pestilence, and other reasons, that there was here but one Nun remaining, whereupon, by the King's License the said House and Church of Wyrthorp, with all its Possessions, were by the Bishop forever united and annext to the Nunnery of St. Michaels by Stanford, and the Nun here remaining, was removed thither.

IVINGHO, in Buckinghamshire.

KING Edward the I. in the eighth year of his Reign, gave divers Lands, to the Prioress and Nuns of St. Margaret of Ivingho, and their Successors, to hold of the King in free, pure, and perpetual Alms.

WABURN, in Norfolk.

THE Priory of Waburn was founded by Sir Ralph Meyngaryn Knight, from whom descended by the Mothers side John de Veer Earl of Oxford.

[Valued at 24 l. 19s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

58 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

CAMPESS, or Campsey, in Suffolk.

TEobandus de Valoines gave his Land in Campess to his two Sisters Joan and Agnes, for the Foundation of a Nunnery there to the honour of God and the glorious Virgin Mary. Which was confirm'd by King John. Matilda de Lancaster, Countess of Ulster, and in the Reign of King Edw. III. by License of that King, found a Chantry of five Priests to officiate in this Church, which Chantry was removed afterwards to a Town call'd Brusseyard in the Mannor of Rokhall; the Revenues and Scite whereof was afterwards, in the said King's Reign given to a Prioress and Nuns of St. Clares Order; which Nunnery was there erected (at Brusseyard} in place of the said Chantry Priests or Chaplains.

[Valued at 182 l. 9s. 5d. per Annum.]

DENNEY Abby, in Cambridgeshire.

IN the last year of Nigellus Bishop of Ely, who died 1169. one Robert, Chamberlain to the Earl of Britony and Richmond, founded the Monastery here as a Cell to Ely, becoming a Monk himself. In the year 1341. Maria de Sancto Paulo, Countess of Pembroke, gave this Mannor of Denney to Sister Katherine de Bolwyk Abbess, and to the Nuns of St. Clare, or Minoresses, there serving God, in free, pure, and perpetual Alms. She also annext and united the Advowson of the Abby of Minoresses at Waterbeche to this at Denney, and translated the Nuns of Waterbeche hither. All which she did by License of King Edward the III. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 883.

[Valued at 172 l. 8s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

SEWARDSLEY, in Northamptonshire.

Robert de Pinkeny, and Simon de Pinkeny, gave certain Lands to the Nuns here, and William de Sancto Johanne, was also a Benefactor.

[Valued at 12 l. 6s. 7d. q. per Annum.]

LITTLEMAREIS, near Yedingham, in Yorkshire.

ROger de Clere, endow'd the Nunnery here with divers Lands. The Church of Teddingham was dedicated in honour of the most blessed Virgin in the year 1241. on the seventeenth of the Kalends of September, at which time divers indulgences were granted. Richard de Breuse hecame Patron of this House in right of Alice his Wife who was descended from the founders. King Henry the III. in the 30th. year of his Reign confirm'd to the Nuns of Teddingham all the Lands given by their several Benefactors.

There was delivered in this House, to the Prioress and Convent sixty and two Loaves daily; to nine Brethren twelve Loaves a piece, weekly; to Brother James fourteen Loaves, to three Priests, to four Chaplains, and

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 59

other Officers accordingly, etc. among the rest of the Deliveries is set down.- Canibus in singulis Maneriis triginta novem panes de pane duriori.- To the Dogs in each Manor thirty nine Loaves of the coursest sort of Bread.

[Valued at 21 l. 16s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

NUNBURNHAM, in Yorkshire.

THE Ancestors of Roger de Merlay Lord of the Barony of Morpath were founders of the Nunnery of Brunham. And it was found by inquision 38. Hen. 3. that these Nuns held Lands here of the Fee of Thomas de Graystoc.

[Valued at 8 l. 1s. 11d. per Annum.]

LYTHOM, in Lancashire, a Cell to Durham.

Richardus filius Rogeri, or Richard Fitz-Rogers, gave his Land at Lythum with the Church there, to the Prior and Monks of Durham for the erecting and establishing at Lytham a Cell of their Order, which he endow'd with divers Lands. This was confirm'd by King John in the second year of his Reign.

CHIRBURY, in Shropshire.

THE Monks here having formerly inhabited at Snede, and removed from thence; King Edward the I. in the ninth year of his Reign, understanding this place not to be convenient for them removed them back again to Snede.

ARDEN, in Yorkshire.

PEter de Hotona founded and endowed an Abby of Nuns at Arden, and dedicated it to St. Andrew; which was confirm'd by Roger de Mowbray Lord of the Fee; and by Elizabeth Heir of the said Peter in the tenth year of Edward the I. In the 6th. of Henry the IV. Jeoffrey Pigot, as Heir of Peter the first Founder, and Elizabeth abovesaid, was admitted by the Nuns here as Founder or Patron.

[Valued at 12 l. per Annum.]

DAVINTON, in Kent.

KING Henry the III. in the thirty ninth year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Prioress of the Church of St. Mary Magdalene of Davyntone, and to the Nuns there serving God, divers Lands and Rents, given by several Benefactors.

60 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

FOSS, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the III. in the 21st. year of his Reign gave to the Prioress and Nuns of Foss without Torksey, sixscore Acres of Land and seven Tofts in Torkesey to hold for ever at the yearly Rent of forty six Shillings.

[Valued at 7 l. 3s. 6d. per Annum.]

WALLINGWELLS, in Nottinghamshire.

RAlph de Cheurocurt, gave to God and St. Mary a place in his Park of Carletuna, for the building a place of Religion; and to it gave other Lands and Liberties, in pure and perpetual Alms.

From this Founder, is descended by a Daughter, the Family of Furneux; the Male Line of which Family is now in Being in Darbyshire under the name of Rooper.

[Valued at 58 l. 9s 10d. per Annum.]

St. CATHERINES Nunnery, without Exeter, in Devonshire.

KING John in tke second year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Church of St. Catherine without Exeter, and the Nuns there, the Lands given to them by William de Trasey, and Henry de Pomerya, with the grant of many Liberties.

FLAMSTED Priory, in Hartfordshire.

AGatha, Widow of William de Gatesden, endowed the Church of St. Giles of Flantsted with certain Lands, which Gift was confirm'd by King Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 50 l. 19s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

CRESSEWELL, in Herefordshire.

WAlter de Lacey gave to the Church of St. Mary at Cressewell, and to the Monks there of the Order call'd Grandimontenses, divers Lands and Revenues; confirm'd by King Henry the III. who also granted to them divers Liberties. Other Benefactors gave them other Lands, all which was confirm'd to them by King Edivard the III. in the first year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 17.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 61

DARBY Priory, in Darbyshire.

KING Henry the III. granted to the Prioress and Nuns de Pratis at Derby, an Augmentation of one hundred Shillings per Annum, out of the Fee-farm of the Town of Nottingham. It was found upon an Extent in the 15. E. 1. that the Scite of the Abby at Derby with a Garden and Curtilage, was worth yearly 20s. And that the said Abby held there, in Demean, four Carucates of Land, each Carucate containing sixty Acres of Land, i.e., Arable Land, etc.

LAMBLEY Nunnery, in Northumberland.

KING John in the second year of his Reign, confirm'd to God, and St. Mary,and St. Patrick, and to the Nuns at Lambeleya, the Scite of the Abby of Lambeleya Super Tinam, and the Lands which Adam de Tindale and Helewisa his wife gave to the said House.

STEINFEILD Priory, in Lincolnshire.

THIS was a Priory of Benedictine Nuns, founded by Henry Son of Henry de Percy. The Patronage of this House came to Jocelin de Lovein by Agnes his Wife, one of the Daughters and Co-heirs of William de Percy. King Edward the I. in the one and twentieth year of his Reign granted the Prioress and Nuns here, free Warren in their Demean Lands, the same not being within the bounds of his Forests.

[Valued at 98 l. 8s. per Annum.]

MODBURY, in Devonshire.

THE Mannor of Modbury, and right of Patronage of the Priory there being in Ida Widow of Sr. James Exton, Knight, by Virtue of a Fine in the 9. Edw. 2. the said Ida through the mediation of Friends released all her title to Richard de Campo-Arnulphi.

CHESTER Nunnery.

THE Monastery of St. Mary here, was founded for Nuns, and endow'd by Ranulph Earl of Chester with Lands and Liberties.

[Valued at 66 l. 18s. 4d. per Annum.]

62 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

ROSSEDALE, in Yorkshire.

RObert de Stutevill founded and endow'd the Nunnery at Rossedale to God and St. Laurence, which was confirm'd by King John. Sibilla de Valoniis, Adam de Neuton, etc. gave other Lands to the Prioress and Nuns here, all which was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the second year of his Reign.

[Valued at 37 l. 12s. 5d. per Annum.]

PEMBROK Priory.

WAlter Marescallus, and William Marescallus both Earls of Pembrok, gave divers Lands and Endowments to the Priory of St. Nicholas at Pembroke.

St. CLEMENTS, adjoyning to York.

THurstan Archbishop of York gave to God and St. Clement, and the Nuns there, divers Lands to hold in pure and perpetual Alms; whose Letters of Endowment were confirm'd by the Dean and Chapter of York. Other Benefactors gave other Lands, all which was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the first year of his Reign. Anno Dom, 1192. Gaufridus Archbishop of York gave the Priory of St. Clements to the Abby of Godestave, but the Nuns here refused to submit to such Donation, and appeal'd to the Pope.

[Valued at 55 l. 11s. 11d. per Annum.]

CHESTHUNT, in Hertfordshire.

KING Henry the III. gave to the Prioress and Nuns here all the Lands and Tenements belonging to the Canons of Cathale, whom he caused to be removed.

[Valued at 14 l. 10s. per Annum.]

FINCHALE, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

FInchale is a solitary place not far from the City of Durham, where a certain Hermit named Godricus de Finchale, who in his youth had visited the holy Sepulcher, spent his old Age in Devotion, and here died with the reputation of great Sanctity. After the death of this Godficus, Ranulphus Bishop of Durham granted this Hermitage, and the Lands adjoyning to Algarus the Prior, and the Monks of Durham. Hugh Bishop of Durham founded and endow'd the Priory of Finchale for such Monks of Durham as the Prior of Durham should from time to time send thither in the service of God and St. John.

[Valued at 122 l. 15s. 3d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 63

The Priory of St. James at Bristol, a Cell of Tewkesbury.

William Earl of Gloucester gave to this House divers Lands and Tithes, and the Profits of the Fair at Bristol, in Whitsun-week, which with other Lands given by other Benefactors was confirm'd by King Henry the II. The same King gave the Monks here certain Liberties in his Forrest. Robert Earl of Gloucester was buried in this Church of St. James, at Bristol.

BUNGEY, in Suffolk.

ROger de Glanvill and Gundreda the Countess, his Wife, founded a Nunnery in the Church of the holy Cross at Bungey. The Endowments whereof as well by the said Roger and his Wife as by a great number of other Benefactors, were all confirm'd to the said Nuns and their Successors to hold in pure and perpetual Alms, by King Henry the II. in the ninteenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 62 l. 0s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

SYLLEY Isle, near Cornwall.

THIS Isle was given of old by the Kings of England to the Abbot and Monks of Tauestock, who used to send two of their Monks hither to perform the Divine Offices, till the Wars with France in the Reign of King Edward the III. And then that King gave License to the Abbot of Tauestock, in the ninteenth year of his Reign, to place here two secular Chaplains instead of Monks.

ROWNEY Priory, in Hertfordshire.

IN the 36. H. 6. Agnes Selby Prioress of this House and the Covent of Nuns here, in respect of the poverty of the place, did by their Deed sealed with their Common-Seal, resign up their Church, House, and Lands, into the hands of their Patron John Fray who designed to convert the same in a better manner. Which John Fray was chief Baron of the Exchequer, and being thus possest of this Priory, he would not convert it to any other use but to the service of God, and therefore obtain'd the King's License in the 37. H. 6. to found and endow here a Chantry for one Priest.

The first Founder of the Priory was Conan Duke of Britony and Richmond, who, with others, endow'd it with Possessions of the value of ten Marks per Annum.

[Valued at 13 l. 10s. 9d. per Annum.]

64 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I

NUNEATON, in Warwickshire.

THIS House was founded and endow'd by Robert Earl of Leicester, Son of Robert de Mellento, in the Reign of King Henry the II. for Nuns of the same Order with those at Font-Ebraud.

Whose Gifts were confirm'd by his Son Robert, and by King Henry the II.

The Prioress and Covent of Font-Ebrald granted to this House the immunity to receive and retain to their own proper use all such gifts as should be made unto them, without any exaction of the said Abbess and Covent of Font-Ebrald. Which immunity and several others were confirm'd to them by Pope Alexander the III.

[Valued at 253 l. 14s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

LUFFELD, in Northamptonshire, a Cell to Westminster.

THE Priory of Luffeild was founded by Robert Earl of Leicester for the Souls of King William the I, and Queen Matilda, etc.

King Henry the I. his Daughter Maud the Empress, and King Edward the I. were Benefactors, and Pope Alexander the III. granted to Ralph Prior of St. Mary's at Luffeild, his Brethren, and their Successors, divers Priviledges by his Bull dated 1174.

Radulfus de Cahienes, Hugo de Sacto Martino, and others gave them divers Churches and Tithes.

King Henry the III. in the fifty sixth year of his Reign reciting the Priory of Luffeild to have been founded by his Predecessors Kings of England, granted to the Prior and Monks there free Chiminage in his Forrest of Whitlewood, for five years next ensuing.

WILBERFOSS, in Yorkshire.

THIS was a House of Nuns dedicated to St. Mary, founded by Helias de Cotton, and endow'd by Alan his Son with divers Lands. King Henry the II. in the fourth year of his Reign, and King Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign, confirm'd their Lands and Estate. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 12.

[Valued at 21 l. 16s. 10d. per Annum.]

GODSTOW Priory of Nuns, in Oxfordshire.

THE Church here was built by their Prioress Editha, and in the year 1138. dedicated in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary and St. John Baptist, by Alexander then Bishop of Lincoln, in presence of King Steven, and Maud the Queen, with abundance of Bishops, Earls, and Barons, and others of prime quality, who all gave to the said Church at that time some Rents and Endowments: Whereupon Albericus Bishop of Hostia the Pope's Legate in England released to every of the said Benefactors

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 65

one year of injoy'd Penance, and granted moreover a Remission of forty days in every year to all those who should in Devotion visit the said Church on the day of St. Priscia the Virgin, or on the Nativity of St. John Baptist.

Their Lands and Revenues were confirm'd by King Steven, and by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign.

In the year 1191. Hugh Bishop of Lincoln visiting in this part of his Diocess, and seeing in this Church a Tomb before the Altar with more than ordinary Ornaments, and being inform'd upon enquiry that it was the Tomb of Rosamond Concubine to King Henry the II. he caused her body to be removed out of the Church, and to be buried in the Church-yard to avoid the scandal of Religion, and to deter other Women from Whoredom.

About the time of the Suppression of this House, Rosamonds Tomb was open'd and her bones found inclosed in Leather, and that in Lead. When it was opened a very sweet smell came out from it. The following Inscription was formerly read on a Cross near Godstow,

Qui meat hac oret, signum salutis adoret,
Utque sibi detur veniam Rosamunda precetur.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 884.

[Valued at 274 l. 5s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

LILLECHIRCHE, in the County of ... [Kent].

KING John gave to the Abby of St. Mary and St. Sulpice at Lillechurch, and the Prioress and Nuns there the Mannor of Lillechurch in pure and perpetual Alms, and granted them a Fair to be there held yearly on the Feast of St. Michael, and two days after; all which was confirm'd by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign, who also in the fiftieth year of his Reign released and pardon'd their Suit-service to his Court at St. Martins le Grand, in London.

TYKEHEAD Priory, in Yorkshire.

KING John in the fifth year of his Reign confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Mary of Tykeheved, and to the Nuns there serving God, the Lands and Possessions then given them by several Benefactors.

In the year 1264. the Prior and Canons of Ellerton, and the Nuns of Tykehead, exchanged certain Lands and Houses which had been the occasions of former Suits and Controversies.

Sir Robert de Aske Kt. the Founder, gave to this House the Rent of 7s 4d. per Annum, for the maintaining of a yearly Obit for himself and Elizabeth his Wife, conditionally that if the Obit were not diligently observ'd, then the said Sum or Rent to be restored to his Heirs. Dated 1522.

[Valued at 20 l. 18s. 10d. per Annum.]

66 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

HUNTINGTON Priory of Nuns.

IN the time of Richard de Gravesend Bishop of Lincoln, Elena Walensis was elected Prioress of the Priory of St. James extra Huntedon the Lady Dervorgull de Galewidia, being then Patroness of the said Priory, and Richard de Foxton her Seneschal, or Steward.

CLIVE, in Somersetshire.

WIlliam de Romare, who married Lucy Countess of Lincoln, founded the Abby of the blessed Virgin and St. Laurence, at Rewsby in Lincolnshire, 8. Steph.

William his youngest Son by the said Lucy, who married Phillip Daughter of Hubert de Burgh Earl of Kent, founded the Abby of our blessed Lady of the Cliff, in Somersetshire, in the 9. Rich. 1. of which one Ralph was the first Abbot.

King Henry the III. confirm'd their Lands and Estate, and moreover, granted to the Abbot and Convent of Clive, the Mannor and Hundred of Bramton, in Devonshire, to be held of the King and his Heirs at the yearly Farm of 22 l. per Annum.

[Valued at 155 l. 9s. 5d q. per Annum.]

HALIWEL Priory, in Middlesex.

KING Richard the I. in the sixth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Nuns of Haliwell the several Lands given to them by Galfredus Camerarius and others.

The same King in the first year of his Reign confirm'd to the Church of St. John Baptist of Haliwell and to the Nuns there serving God, the Ground on which the said Church stands cum pertin. viz. the Marish or Meadow in which the Fountain call'd Haliwell rises, with other Lands given by Richard the Bishop of London, Walter Precentor of St. Pauls, etc.

These Nuns held also certain Lands at Camerwell and Pecham given to them by several Benefactors.

KERSEY Priory, in Suffolk.

NEfta de Cokefeld, Widow of Thomas de Burgo, gave to God, and to the Church of St. Mary, and St. Anthony of Kersey, and to the Canons there, divers Lands, of which she and her second Husband past a fine in the 24. Hen. 3.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 67

KINGTON Priory, in Wiltshire.

RObert Burnell Bishop of Bath and Wells founded this House to God and St. Mary, for Nuns, whose Deed of Foundation was exemplified by Inspectimus 19. E. 1.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 887.

[Valued at 25 l. 9s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

BURNHAM, in Buckinghamshire.

ANno. Dom. 1266. Richard King of the Romans founded a Monastery here for Nuns, which he dedicated to God and St. Mary, and endow'd it with his Mannor and Advowson of Burnham and other Lands. Witnesses to whose Deed or Charter of Foundation, were his Brother King Henry the III. and Prince Edward his eldest Son, with others.

[Valued at 51 l. 2s. 4d. q. per Annum.]

STOKE-CLARE Priory, in Suffolk.

THIS House was founded in the year 1248. by Richard de Clare Earl of Gloucester, from whom descended the Mortimers Earls of March, and the Royal House of York, as is set forth in a long Pedigree in Latin and English Verse, in Dialogue between a Fryer and a Secular at the Tomb of Joan of Acres Daughter of Edward the I. and Wife of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester. This House being an alien Priory and Cell to the Abby of Beekeherlewyn, in Normandy, King Richard the II. in the ninteenth year of his Reign, made it Indigena, and gave it as a Cell to St. Peters at Westminster.

Pope John, in the fifth year of his Pontificate, translated this House from a Priory of Monks into a Colledge of a Dean and Secular Canons. This was done at the Petition of Edmund, Earl of March, Heir of the first Founders, who by his Deed dated 7. Hen. 5. granted and confirm'd to the Dean and Canons here all the Lands and Priviledges belonging to the Priory. Vid. infra, 1004. Vol. 3. part 2. p. 164.

[Valued at 324 l. 4s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

GLOUCESTER-HALL, in the Suburbs of Oxford.

THIS was founded and endow'd Anno 1283.(11. E. 1.) for the maintenance of thirteen Benectine Monks of the Abby of Gloucester by John Giffard Lord of Brimesfeild. 19. E. 1. That King granted his License of Mortmain.

It appears by the Founders Deed of Foundation, that the House was built upon certain Ground purchased of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem, in a Lane commonly then called Stockwell-Street, that the Church here was dedicated to St. John the Apostle and St. Benedict the Abbot and Confessor, and that the House was erected for Benedictine Monks Causa studii.

68 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

MISSENDEN, in Buckinghamshire.

IT was found by Inquision taken at 51. E. 3. that the Abby of Mussenden was founded in the year 1293. by William de Mussenden, who held the Mannor of Mussenden of the Earl of Gloucester by Knights service. In the Chapter-House and Church belonging to this Abby did lie buried several of the Missendens descended from the Founder, whose names may be seen in the Book at large. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 18.

[Valued at 261 l. 14s. 6d. q. per Annum.]

The MINORESSES, at London.

KING Edward the I. in the one and twentieth year of his Reign granted his License of Mortmain to Edmund his Brother and his Wife, Blanch Queen of Navarre, to build a House in the Parish of St. Botulphs without Algate, for Nuns of the Order of Minoresses, there to remain in the service of God, the blessed Mary, and St. Francis.

[Vaued at 318 l. 8s. 5d. per Annum.]

WATERBECHAM, in Cambridgshire.

KING Edward the I. in the twenty second year of his Reign granted to Dionisia de Monte-Canisa, the Mannor of Waterbeche, to build a religious House there for Minoresses of the Order of St. Clare to be brought over from beyond the Seas. All which was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign.

HOLAND, in Lancashire.

HERE being formerly a Collegiate Church or Chappel of St. Thomas the Martyr, served by Secular Chaplains, Walter Bishop of Coventry and Litchfeild, in the year 1319. by consent of Robert de Holland the Patron, alter'd the Foundation into a Priory consisting of a Prior and twelve Benedictine Monks. Upon every Vacation or Death of the Prior, the Monks were to choose three of their House, one of which being approved by the Patron, and presented to the Bishop was to be by him constituted Prior. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 889.

[Valued at 53 l. 3s. 4d. pe Annum.]

Of certain Antient Monasteries in Wales.

MOrcant a King in Wales having treacheroufly kill'd his Uncle Frioc, after he had in a most solemn manner sworn an inviolable peace with him before the holy Altar, was by Oudoceus Bishopoi Landaff, in a Synod of his Clergy, which he had assembled for that purpose, enjoyn'd for the said perjury and homicide, to perform Fastings, Prayers, and Alms Deeds; and being on his sincere Repentance, received again in the Christian Communion, he granted and quit claimed to the Abbies of Catoc, Ildut, and Docun, and to the Cathedral Church of Landaff, divers Liberties and Immunities.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 69

Alien Priories, of Benedictines.

Viz. Such Monasteries here in England as did belong to certain greater and elder Monasteries of the same Order beyond the Seas, and were subject to, and did depend on the same; and had the name of Cells.

DEREHURST, in Gloucestershire, a Cell to St. Denis in France.

HERE was an old Abby destroy'd by the Danes. But after the Norman Conquest, in the year 1069. King William the Conqueror endow'd here a new Priory and made it a Cell to St. Denis in France: or rather confirm'd what King Edward the Confessor had done before. King Henry the VI. in the twenty first year of his Reign made this Priory Indigena.

OTERY, in Devonshire, a Cell to St. Mary's at Roan.

THIS Priory was given to the Church of St. Mary at Roan by King Edward the Confessor in the year 1060. In the 8. Edw. 3. the Dean and Chapter of St. Mary's at Roan, by the King's License, granted their Mannor of Otery, and Advowson of the Church there, to John de Grandison Bishop of Exeter, who in the eleventh year of that King founded here a Colledge of Secular Canons.

LEVISHAM, in Kent, a Cell to St. Peter's at Gaunt, in Flanders.

KING Henry the I. in the thirteenth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks of St. Peters of Gant, the Mannor of Levesham and Greenwich, etc. with divers Liberties, formerly granted by King Edward and King William his Father. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 890.

St. MICHAELS of the MOUNT, in Cornwall, a Cell to St. Michael, in Normandy.

Robert Earl of Morton gave St. Michaels Mount, in Cornwall, to God and the Monks of the Church of St. Michael de Periculo Maris, in Normandy, Anno Dom. 1085.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 902.

70 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

MERSEY, in Essex, a Cell to St. Owens at Roan.

IT was found by Inquisition 4. E. 3. that the Mannors of Mersey Fyngrinho and Veet, and half the hundred of Wenestr, in the County of Essex, were given to the Abby of St. Owens, in Normandy, by St. Edward the Confessor, and confirm'd by King William, and King Henry the II.

ANDEVER, in Hampshire, a Cell to St. Florence of Saumurs.

KING William the Conqueror (or as the Words of the Deed are, Willielmus Rex qui armis Anglicam terram subjugavit) gave to Sr. Florence, the Church of Andever, with divers Lands and Revenues to the same Church belonging: Confirm'd by King Edward the II. in the eighth year of his Reign.

BLITH Priory, in Nottinghamshire, a Cell to St. Catherines at Rohan.

ANno Dom. 1088. Roger de Builly and Muriel his Wife founded and endowed this House with Lands and great Liberties. All which was afterwards confirm'd to the Monks here by King Henry the II. and by Idonea de Veteri ponte Daughter and Heir of John de Bullei, by her Deed dated 1251. King John in the second year of his Reign gave the Chapelry of Blyth, and divers other Churches and Lands to St. Mary's at Rohan.

COVENHAM, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of St. Karileph, in le Maine in France.

KING William the Conqueror Anno 1082. gave this Town situated in that part of Lincolnshire, called Lyndsey to God and St. Karileph, 31. Edw. 1. A Writ of Quod Damnum was executed at Lincoln, in order to an alienation. of this Cell, from the Abbot and Covent of St. Karileph in the Diocess of Mans, to the Abbot and Covent of Kirkestede here in England.

ABERGAVENNY, in Monmouthshire, a Cell of St. Vincents in Maine.

THIS Priory was founded by Hamelinus who came into England with the Conqueror, and died in the Reign of King William Rufus. William de Brewofa, and others of the founders Linage were Benefactors. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 904.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 71

WOTTON-WAVEN, in Warwickshire.

RObert de Toenio gave this Estate to the Monks of St. Peter at Conchis, in Normandy; on whom King Henry the I. conferred great Priviledges.

FOLKESTON, in Kent, a Cell to the Abby of Lolley in Normandy.

NIgellus de Munevilla, Anno 1095. gave this Church of Folkston to Ranulph then Abbot of the Church of St. Mary de Lonleyo, and to the Monks there, in pure and perpetual Alms. Which, with divers other Lands and Revenues, was confirm'd to them by William de Abrincis Lord of Folkeston, who descended from the said Nigellus.

KIRKBY, in Warwickshire, a Cell of St. Nicholas in Anjou.

Anno 1077. Gosfredus de Wirchia gave to God and the Monastery of St. Nicholas in Anjou, Lands in Kirkby with other Lands and Possessions elsewhere; from whom descended Roger de Mulbraio, who gave to the Church of St. Nicholas of Kirkeby the Church of Newbold. Afterwards Thomas Earl of Nottingham having founded a House of Carthusians at Epworth in the Isle of Axholme, the Abbot of St. Nicholas at Anjou was prevailed with to assign his Estate in Monks-Kirkby, Newbold, etc., to the said House of Carthusians, which was confirm'd by King Henry the V. in the third year of his Reign.

The priory of the Holy Trinity at York, a Cell to Majus-Monasterium in France. [Marmonsties in Tourain]

RAdulphus Paganellus gave the Church of the holy Trinity at York to the Monks of St. Martin in the Majus-Monastery, with divers other Possessions. It was found by Inquisition taken at York 34. Edw. 1. That the Heirs of the Founder claim'd no right in the Temporals of this Priory upon the death of any Prior, but only to place a Porter to see that the Goods of the Priory be not stollen during the Vacation, and that upon the arrival of a new Prior from the Abbot of Majus-Monasterium, he did use to enter upon the Possession of his Office, without fealty or other duty to the Patron.

HEDLAY, in Yorkshire, a Cell to the Holy Trinity at York.

YPolitus de Bram gave to God and St. Mary of Hedlay and the Monks there certain Lands in Midelton. All which was confirm'd to the Prior and Convent of the Trinity at York, and to their Cell at Hedlay, by Peter de Midleton, in the year 1290.

72 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

LANCASTER, a Cell to St. Martins at Sees in France.

Roger Earl of Poictiers gave the Church of St. Mary at Lancaster with divers Lands and Revenues to the Monastery of St. Martin. All which was confirm'd by John Earl of Morton; and by King Richard the II.

Anno 1246. John Romanus Archdeacon of Richmond, appropriated the Church of Lancaster and Chappels thereunto belonging to this Priory, reserving twenty Marks per Annum for a Vicar presentative.

OTTERY, in Devonshire, a Cell to the Abby of St. Michael pericular, in Normandy.

THIS Priory was founded by King John for four Monks and endow'd with Lands of 100 l. value per Annum. These Monks were to distribute to the Poor at their Gates, bread to the value of 16s. every week.

LODRES, in Dorsetshire, a Cell to the Abby of St. Mary de Mon-Bur.

BEnedict de Redueriis gave this Mannor to the Monastery of St. Mary de Monte Burgo; confirm'd by King Henry the I.

APLEDERCOMB, in the Isle of Wight, a Cell to the Abby of Mont-Burg, in Normandy.

THIS Priory consisted only of a Prior and two Monks, who were removed by Command of King Edward the III. to a more Inland Habitation, first to the Abby of Hyde, and after that in the 13. E. 3. to Salisbury.

FRAMPTON, in Dorsetshire, a Cell to Caen, in Normandy.

THIS was given to St. Stephens at Caen, and the Monks there, by King William the Conqueror, and with divers other Lands and Liberties confirm'd to them by King Richard the II.

SWANESEY, in Cambridgeshire, a Cell to St. Sergius, in Angiers.

THE Church of Swanesey with all manner of Tithes there, and in the Vills thereunto belonging were given by Alan Earl of Britain, to the Abby of St. Sergius and St. Bachus at Angiers; who presented the Prior to this Priory, as often as the Office avoided.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 73

BLAKENHAM, in Suffolk, a Cell to St. Mary at Bec.

THIS was given to the Abby abovesaid by Walter Giffard, and confirm'd by King William Rufus.

COGES, in Oxfordshire, a Cell of Fischamp.

MAnnasses Arsic gave this Estate with other Tithes and Revenues to the Church of Fiscampe, Anno 1103.

WESTWOOD, in Worcestershire, a Cell to Font-Ebraud.

OSbert Fitz Hugh, and Eustachia de Say his Mother erected here a Convent of Nuns of Font-Ebraud.

WELLS, in Norfolk, a Cell of the Abby at Caen, in Normandy.

KING Edward the III. in the forty seventh year of his Reign (being then in War with France) committed the Custody of the Priory of Paunfeild and Wells to Hugh Fastolf, to hold at the yearly Rent of 40 l. per Annum to the King and 10 l, per Annum to each Monk there, for his support.

This Priory being first given by William de Estois to the Abby of St. Steven at Caen, and after seized into the King's hands by Edward the III. it continued in the Crown till 9. Edw. 4. at which time that King desirous to restore this Estate to its antient use, the Spiritualty, and out of the Devotion which he bore to St. Stephen, he conferr'd the whole Estate which did formerly belong to this Priory on the Dean and Canons of his free Chappel of St. Steven at Westminster.

PATRICKSBURN, in Kent, a Cell to Beau-Lieu, in Normandy.

IT was found by Inquisition taken at Canterbury the 6 Edw. 3 that this Mannor was given to the Priory of Beau-Lieu, in Normandy, by Johannes de Pratellus, and confirm'd by King John.

STOKE-CURCY, in Devonshire, a Cell to Lonley, in France.

HUgh de Novilla gave to God and the Monks at Stok-curcy, the Church of St. Andrew of Stoke-curcy, with other Revenues. William de Curcy, and John de Novilla were also Benefactors.

74 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

SHIRBURN, in Hampshire, a Cell of St. Vigor Cerasius.

HEnry de Portu, or Port gave the West part of Shirburn with the Church there, and divers other Revenues, to God and St. Vigor Cerasius, all which was confirm'd to the Monks at Shirburn by his Descendents. King Edward the III. gave the Custody of the Hospital of St. Julian, or Domus Dei, at Southampton to Queens Colledge in Oxford; to which Hospital King Edward the IV. in the first year of his Reign gave the alien Priory of Shireburn, in Hampshire.

BURWELL, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of St. Mary Silvae Majoris.

JOhn de Hay gave to God and the Monastery of St. Mary Silvae Majoris; and to the Monks at Burwell divers Possessions; from whom descended Gilbert de Umframvill Earl of Angos, who lived at Burwell.

LANKYWAN, in Wales, a Cell to the Abby of Lyra.

EDmund, Son of King Henry the III. discharged this House from all Exactions and Troubles from his Heirs or their Bayliffs, in the Vacation of a Prior.

SELE, in Sussex, a Cell of St. Florence at Saumurs.

WIlliam de Braiosa, by his Deed dated 1075. gave the Church of St. Peter at Sele, with other Churches and Revenues both in England and Normandy to the Abbot and Monks of St. Florence. This Priory of Sele was made Indigena, or Denison 19. R. 2.

OKEBURN, in Wiltshire, a Cell to Bec, in Normandy.

MAtilda de Wallengfort gave to the Church Of St. Mary of Bec, both the Okeburns, viz. the greater and the less. Richard Earl of Cornwall by his Deed dated 1153. discharg'd the Abbot and Monks of Bec from all Exactions and Suit of Court in his honour of Walingford, except only that his Bayliff of Walingford should once a year keep a view of Frankpledge at Okeburn, and then be entertain'd for that day, with four Horses at most.

WILLESFORD, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to Bec in Normandy.

BY Inquisition taken at Stranford, it was found that the Prior of the Order of Bec held in Willesford and Ancaster, Lands of the value 16 l. per Annum of the Gift of Hugh de Evermewe.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 75

WEDEN-PINKNEY, in Northamptonshire, a Cell to St. Lucian near Beauvoys in France.

GIles, Ralph, Gilbert, Henry, and Robert de Pinkeni, successively gave Lands and Revenues to the Abby of St. Lucian and the Monks at St. Mary's of Weden. Anno Dom. 1392. The Abbot and Convent of St. Lucian convey'd their Priory of Weden, and all the Estate thereunto belonging to the Abbot and Convent of Bitlesden and their Successors, in consideration of a Sum of Gold received, and the yearly pension of ten Marks to be paid to the Abbot and Convent of St. Lucian and their Successors in the Church of St. Mary at Calais, on the Feast of St. John Baptist.

TYWARDREIT, in Cornwall, a Cell to Angiers in France.

RObert de Cardinan gave divers Lands and Revenues in Cornwall, to the Church of St. Sergius and St. Bachus at Angiers, and to the Church of St. Andrew of Tywardrait, and to the Monks there; all which was confirm'd by King Henry the III.

BIRSTALL, in Yorkshire, a Cell of St. Martins at Albamarle.

THIS was given among other Lands and Revenues to the Church and Monks of St. Martin without the Castle of Albamarle in Normandy, by Steven Earl of Albamarle 1115. Walter Archbishop of York first settled the Monks of Albamarle here at Birstal, and granted to them divers Immunities. Charles the VI. King of France by his Deed dated 1395. setting forth that the Abbot and Convent of St. Martin had past over to his beloved Cousin the Duke of Lancaster their Priory of Birstal in England for the Sum of one thousand Livers, granted them his License to purchase Lands of the like value in France. The said Abbot and Convent of St. Martin by their Deed dated 18. Rich. 2. granted all their Lands, Tithes and Pensions here in England to the Abbot and Convent of Kirkstal (in Yorkshire).

GOLDCLIVE, in Monmouthshire, a Cell to Bec in Normandy.

RObert de Candos gave this Church of St. Mary Magdalen of Goldclive with divers other Lands, etc., to the Monks of St. Mary at Bec. All which was confirm'd by King John in the second year of his Reign. This Priory was afterwards united to the Abby of Teukesbury, which union, was ratified by Pope Eugenius, Anno Dom. 1402.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 904.

76 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

MINTING, in Lincolnshire, a Cell of Benedict Super Leyre.

THIS was given to that Monastery, by Ranulph Earl of Chester.

BOXGRAVE, in Sussex, a Cell of l'Essay in Normandy.

THIS Priory was founded in the Reign of King Henry the I. William Earl of Arundell endow'd it with great Possessions, and gave and confirm'd it to the Monks of the Holy Trinity at l'Essay. The first Founder of this House (dedicated to the blessed Mary and St. Blase), at Boxgrave, was Robert de Haya, who placed here three Monks of the Order of St. Benedict; Roger de Sancto Johanne who married Cecily, his Daughter, doubled the number of Monks, whose Sons William and Robert de Sancto Johanne, still encreas'd them to fifteen, conferring divers Revenues for their maintenance, out of which he reserved only an annual Pension of three Marks to the Abby of l'Essay. Thomas Abbot of the Holy Trinity at l'Essay, granted to the Prior of Boxgrave and his Successors, that they might constantly have fifteen Monks in their Priory, and that upon the decease of any, they might supply their number with whom they pleas'd to elect. King Edward the III. in the thirteenth year of his Reign discharged this Priory of all seizures as an alien Priory in time of War, and made it Denison.

LONG BENINGTON, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to Savigny in Normandy.

RAdulphus Filgeriarum gave Belintone to the Abby of Savigny. The Monks here held four Carucates of Land each Carucate worth 4 l. per Annum.

GROMOND, in Yorkshire, a Cell to the Abby of Gramont in France.

THIS was given to the said Abby by Joan late Wife of Robert de Turneham, and confirm'd by King John in the fifteenth year, of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 15.

MONKENLEN, in Herefordshire, a Cell to Conchis in Normandy.

WIlliam Bishop of Hereford did by his Episcopal Authority confirm and appropiate to the Abby of St. Peter at Conchis the Mannor and Church of Monekeslen, and other Revenues, given by Ralph de Tony Senior.

VOL. I. BENEDICTINES. 77

TOFT Priory in Norfolk, a Cell to Preaux.

THIS was given by Robert Earl of Mellent, and with divers other Lands confirm'd to the Abby of St. Peter at Preaux by King Henry the II. and by King Edward the I. with great Liberties.

ALVERTON, in Yorkshire, a Cell to the Majus-Monasterium.

Richard Malleverer gave the Church of St. Martin in Alverton to the Monks of Majus Monasterium in Alverton. Confirm'd by King Henry the II.

MONMOUTH, a Cell to the Abby of St. Florence at Saumurs.

WIbenocus de Monemue built in his Castle of Monemue a Church to the honour of God, St. Mary, and St. Florence, and gave it in perpetual Alms to the Monks of St. Florence at Saumurs. John de Monemuta gave to the Church of St. Mary of Monmouth, and to the Abby of Saumurs, the Hospital of St. John at Monmouth.

HAGH, in Lincolnshire, a Cell to the Abby de Voto near Cherburg.

KING Henry the II. gave and confirm'd to the Abby and Cannons of Cherburg in France, the Mannor and Church of Hagh with large Liberties, as they were formerly confirm'd by King Henry his Grandfather.

The particulars and values of their Estate was found by Inquisition 22. Edw. 3. Among other things, that they had certain Rents in Grantham, etc.

HINKLEY, in Leicestershire, a Cell to Lyra in Normandy.

RObert Earl of Leicester gave to the Abby of Lyra, the Church of Hinkelai with divers Chappels and other Churches adjoyning, with their Tithes. All which was confirm'd by King Henry the II.

HORSELEGH, in Essex, a Cell to St. Martin of Troarn.

THE Abby and Covent of St. Martin's at Troarn in Normandy, granted the Churches of Horselegh and Whitenhirst, to the Prior and Convent of Bruton, in exchange for other Lands which the Priory of Bruton had in Normandy, from which time the Prior of Bruton placed a Prior in Horselegh from among his own Canons, and presented secular Vicars to the said two Churches. This was confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the forty fifth year of his Reign.

78 BENEDICTINES. VOL. I.

ABBERBURY, in Shropshire, a Cell to the Abby of Gramont.

FUlco Fitz-Warin founded and gave this Priory to the Monks of Gramount with divers Lands, etc., confirm'd by King Henry the II. in the seventeenth of his Reign. And by Thomas Corbeth in the year 1262.

LEVENESTRE, in Sussex, a Cell to Almenesches.

THE Possessions of the Benectine Nuns of St. Mary of Almenesches as well in France as England were confirm'd to them by Pope Alexander, and their Lands in their own hands exempted from Tithes, by his Bull dated 1178.

By the Stat. made at Carlile 35. E. 1. commonly called De asportatis Religiosoram, it is anacted that no Foreign Abby, etc. shall impose any Tallage, Payment, or Assesment whatsoever, on any of their Houses subject to them in England, under the Penalty of forfeiting their Estate here. In the Parliament held at Westminster 13. R. 2. it was ordain'd that no alien of the French Nation should enjoy any Benefice in this Kingdom; notwithstanding several Frenchmen having purchased Letters of Denization, continued to enjoy Benifices, etc., whereby great Treasures were transported out of the Kingdom, the King's Council discovered to his Enemies in Franc, etc. It was therefore enacted 1. H. 5. ch. 7. that the foresaid Ordinance be but in due execution against all, but such Priors Alien as are conventual, and such as have Induction and Institution, provided that such be Catholicks, and that they give security not to discover, etc. It was finally enacted in the Parliament held at Leicester 2. H. 5. for the Inconveniencies above- mentioned, and also for that the English had their Possessions seiz'd in France, that all the Possessions of the Prior's aliens (except Conventuals, etc.) be vested in the King's hands and his Heirs for ever, to the intent that Divine Services in the places aforesaid may for the time to come be more duly perform'd by English people, than they have been by French.

VOL. I. 79

OF THE

Cluniacenses or Monks of Clugny.

The first Institutor of this Order, or rather Reformation of Monks, was Abbot Berno, to whom William then Duke of Aquitain, gave the place call'd Clugny or Cluny in Burgundy for their first Habitation, in the year of our Lord 890. This was a Reform of St. Bennet's Order.

WENLOCK, in Shropshire.

HERE was formerly a Nunnery in which Milburg Neice of Wilphere King of Mercia, lived, and died Abbess, with the Reputation of great Sanctity. Which House being totally decayed, Roger Earl of Mongomery, built here a Monastery for the Monks of Cluny. The Church here was dedicated to St. Mildred. Isabel de Say Wife of William Fitz-Alan was a Benefactress. And this Priory was made Indigena 18. R. 2. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 907.

[Valued at 401 l. 0s. 7d. q. per Annum.]

DUDLEY, in Staffordshire, a Cell to Wenlock.

THE Church here was dedicated to St. James, which with other Churches and Lands, Pope Lucius did confer and appropriate to this Priory in the year 1190. granting in the same Deed divers great Priviledges and Immunities to the Monastery. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 907.

LEWES, in Sussex.

THIS House was founded by William de Warren Earl of Surrey in the time of King William the Conqueror, Which Earl obtain'd from the Abby of St. Peter in Burgundy four Cluniac Monks, to whom he gave the Church of St. Pancrace adjoyning to his Castle of Lewis, and endow'd them with divers Lands and Possessions, by the License, and Confirmation of King William; with a Curse to the Violators of his Gift, and a Blessing to the Defenders. Yet this Priory remain'd a Cell to the Abby of Clugny in Burgundy till the forty seventh year of King E. 3. at which time that King made it indigena, and independant; so also the Priories of Castleacre, Prittlewell, Farleigh, Horton, and Stanesgate, which were all Cells belonging to the Priory of Lewis. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 908.

[Valued at 920 l. 4s. 6d. per Annum.]

80 CLUNIACS. VOL. I.

PRITTLEWELL, in Essex, a Cell to Lewes.

RObert Fitz-Suene gave the Church of Prittlewell to the Priory of St. Pancrace at Lewes, to be a Cell of that House, and to be furnisht with Monks of the Rule of St. Bennet, and Order of Clugny from Lewes; ordaining by his Deed of Foundation that the Prior of Prittlwel should pay yearly to the Prior of Lewes one mark for an acknowledgment.

[Valued at 155 l. 11s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

WESTACRE, in Norfolk, a Cell to Lewes.

THIS House was granted and confirm'd by Rodulphus de Toneio Lord of the Soil, to Oliver, Priest of Acre, and Walter his Son, who became Canons regular here.

[Valued at 268 l. 13s. 7d. q. per Annum.]

FARLEY, in Wiltshire, a Cell to Lewes.

THIS Priory was founded Anno Dom. 1125. and dedicated to God and St. Mary Magdalen. It was endow'd by Humphrey de Bohun the King's Sewer, and Margery his Wife, with the Mannor of Farley and the Park there, and with divers other Lands and Revenues. All which was confirm'd to them by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign.

[Valued at 153 l. 14s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

HORTON, in Kent, a Cell to Lewes.

THIS House was founded and endow'd by Robert de Ver Constable of England, and Adeliza his Wife, and subjected to the Priory of Lewes, to which they were to pay a Mark per Annum as an acknowledgment. In this House did inhabit thirteen, or at least eight Monks: who were to say three Masses dayly, viz. the High Mass, our Lady's Mass, and the third pro defunctis. Their Seal was kept by three Monks, viz. the Prior, Sub-prior, and another.

[Valued at 95 l. 12s. 2d. per Annum.]

STANESGATE, in Essex, a Cell to Lewes.

Anno Dom. 1177. Alexander Prior of this House, and the Covent of the same, with the assent of the Covent of Lewes, granted the Tithes of their Fee at Clerkenwell, with their Land there, to the Nuns of St. Mary at Clerkenwell, they paying to the Prior of Stanesgate, a yearly Pension of ten shillings for the said Tithes and Lands.

VOL. I. CLUNIACS. 81

CLIFFORD, in Herefordshire, a cell to Lewes.

IT appeared by Inquisition 20. E. 3. that this Priory was founded by Simon Fitz-Richard Fitz-Ponce formerly Lord of Clifford and Ancestor of the Countess of Lincoln, and that this House was not alien, or dependant on any other beyond Sea. It was subjected by the Founder to the Priory of Lewes.

[Valued at 57 l. 7s. 4d. per Annum.]

CASTLE-ACRE, in Norfolk.

FOunded Anno Dom. 1090. William de Warren Earl of Surrey, the first of that name, and his Son Earl William the II. were great Benefactors, and gave to God, and St. Mary, and to the holy Apostles Peter and Paul, and to the Cluniac Monks of St. Pancrace (i.e. of the Priory of Lewes) serving God at Achra, divers Lands and Revenues. Besides whom many other Benefactors gave other Mannors and Lands, Tithes and Churches, as may be seen in particular in the Book at large, p. 626, 627, 628, 629.

Herbert, Bishop of Norwich constituted the Church and Monastery here, and placed therein Cluniac Monks, under the Rule of St. Benedict. Bishop Ebrard impropriated and confirm'd to them their several Churches, given to them by the Earls of Surrey and other Benefactors.

It was certified to King Edw. the I. in the thirty fourth year of his Reign that the Prior and Convent of Castle-acre were English, and not Aliens of the Subjects of the King of France, or his Adherers; and that no Rent or Pension was paid by them to any of his Dominion or Adherents, nor did tbey owe obedience to any such, except only, that when the Abbot of Clugny comes sometimes into England he uses to visit in the said Priory. Hereupon this House was allow'd to be Indigena and not Alienigena, and to be priviledged accordingly, 18. E. 2.

[Valued at 306 l. 11s. 4d. ob. q. per Annum.]

MENDHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell to Castle-acre.

William Son of Roger de Huntingfeild gave to God, and St. Mary of Acre, and to the Monks there, the Isle of St. Mary of Mendham to be in the same manner subject to Castle-acre, as that House is to St. Pancrace, and that to the Church of Clugny.

The Prior of Castle-acre and Convent there did grant to Roger de Huntingfeild, who was their great Benefactor, to maintain at least eight Monks at this Priory of Mendhanm and not to depose the Prior here unless for one of these three causes, Disobedience, Incontinence, or Dilapidation of the House.

82 CLUNIACS. VOL. I.

BROMHOLM, in Norfolk, a Cell to Castle-acre.

THE Estate here, with divers other Lands, was given to the Monks of Acre, by William de Glanville, and confirm'd to them by Bartholmew his Son.

The Prior and Convent of Bromholm, held Lands in Fee-farm of the Prior and Convent of Acre, at the Annual Rent of fourteen Marks, five shillings and four pence payable at three terms by the year, viz; at the Feast of St. Michael 64s. at the Purification 64s. and at Penticost 64s.

Controversie arising between the Priors of Lewis, and Acre, and the Prior of Bromholm, about placing the Prior of this House. The whole matter was referr'd by Pope Gregory the IX. to be heard and determin'd by the Prior of Osolveston in Leicestershire, and the Dean of Rutland; who decreed among other things, that upon the death of the Prior of Bromholm, the Prior of Acre should nominate six Monks, three of Acre and three of Bromholm, out of which number, the Convent of Bromholm should choose one for their Prior, etc. This Decree was made in the Church of St. Mary near the Bridge in Stanford, on Wednesday next before Palm-Sunday 1229.

Pope Celestin by his Bull dated in the fourth year of his Pontificate, granted that this Priory should be free from any subjection to that of Acre.

King Henry the III. in the thirteenth year of his Reign granted to the Prior and Monks of St. Andrew of Bromholm to have a Fair there yearly at the Feast of the Exhaltation of the holy Cross, and a Market weekly on the Monday. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 909.

[Valued at 100 l. 5s. 3d. q. per Annum.]

REINHAM, in Norfolk, a Cell to Castle-acre.

William de Lisews founded here a House for three Monks at least in a place then called Normannesherch, and endow'd it with Lands, in honour of the blessed Virgin and St. John the Evangelist, all which Jeoffrey his Son gave and confirm'd to the Monks of Acre.

Roger Prior of Reinham granted to Lena, a Nun and other Nuns there serving God,a certain Solitary Place or Hermitage near Winghale, parcel of the Possessions of this House, to be held by them at the yearly Rent of twelve pence. To which House of Nuns Riginald Fitz Hamon gave other Lands with his Daughter whom he made a religious Woman there.

SLEVESHOLM, in Norfolk, a Cell of Castle-acre.

FOunded by William Earl of Warren, and by him given to Monks of Castle-acre. John Earl of Warren confirm'd his Great Grand-fathers Foundation Anno Dom. 1309. (3. E. 2.) and granted, that as often as the Priory of this House should be void, the Prior of Castle-acre should have full power to confer the place on a Monk of that House, which new Prior being first presented to the said John Earl of Warren or his Heirs, and having done his Fealty, should be admitted with effect.

VOL. I. CLUNIACS. 82

BERMUNDSEY, in Surrey.

THIS Monastery of St. Saviours of Burmundsey was founded by Alwinus Child a Citizen of London, in the year 1082.

Many were the Benefactors to this House. King Henry the I, in the year 1117. gave to the Monks here the Mannors of Bermundsey, Rederhith, and Delwich, the hide of Southwark, and other Lands. Walkelinus Mammynot gave them a Moiety of all Greenwich.

King Henry the II. in the year 1159. confirm'd to them the Donation of divers Churches, as Camberwell, and others.

Anno 1213. the Prior of Burmundsey raised from the Foundation a new Building adjoyning to the Walls of his House, which was call'd the Elemosinary, or Hospitale conversorum & puerorum, in honour of St. Thomas the Martyr.

Anno 1268. King Henry the III. granted to the Monks of Burmundsey a Market every Monday at their Mannor of Charleton in Kent, and a Fair to be held there at the Feast of the Holy Trinity yearly.

The Mannor of Bermundsey was ancient Demesn of the Crown, and all the Lands and Tenements in this Mannor cum pertin are impleadable in the Court of this Mannor by the King's writ of Right according to the Custom of the said Mannor, and not at the Common Law.

Within the Mannor of Burmundsey were comprised the several Towns of Bermondesey, Camberwell, Rederhith, the Hide of Southwark, Dilwich, Waddon, and Reyham, with their Appurtenants.

[Valued at 474 l. 14s. 4d. ob. q. per Annum.]

The Priory of St. James by Exeter, in Devonshire.

BAldwin Earl of Devonshire founded this Priory without the Walls at Exeter for Cluniac Monks, and endowed it with Revenues. Confirm'd by Richard Earl of Devonshire, Son of Baldwin, 1157. and by Robert Bishop of Exeter, Anno 1146. Also by Maud the Empress. Infra p. 1025.

[Valued at 502 l. 12s. 9d. per Annum.]

LENTON, in Nottinghamshire.

William Peverel built this House for Cluniac Monks, and gave to the Abby of Clugny great Revenues for the Maintenance of certain Monks of their Order in this Priory, providing however that this House should be free and discharged from all exactions of that Abby, paying only one Mark per Annum as an acknowledgment. To this Priory of the Holy Trinity at Lenton King Henry the II. was a Benefactor, so were also King Steven, and King John, which last granted them the Tithes of his hunting (Decimam venationis nostrae) in the Counties of Nottingham and Derby. All whose Grants were confirm'd by King Edward the II. in the tenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 30.

[Valued at 529 l. 15s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

84 CLUNIACS. VOL. I.

PONTEFRACT, in Yorkshire.

THE first Founder of this House was Robert de Laceio, who built it in a place then called Kirkeby, in honour of St. John the Apostle and Evangelist, subjecting it to the Church of Clugny from whence it was furnisht with Monks, aad gave them several Lands and Revenues; confirm'd by Hugo de la Val. Henry de Lascy Son of the said Robert, gave to these Monks the Custody of the Hospital of St. Nicholas in Pomfract, in the year 1159. Pope Celestin confirm'd the Estate given to this Monastery, and granted them several Priviledges, among others, that in the time of a general Interdiction it may be lawful for the Monks here to celebrate the Divine Offices, with a low Voice, their Church-Doors shut, and without the sound of any Bells, Adam Fitz-Swany gave divers Lands to the Monks of Pontfract, he also gave them for a Cell, the Priory of St. Mary Magdalen of Lunda, or Monk-Breton, which he had founded on his paternal Estate. After many Controversies between the Monks of Pontfract and the Monks of Breton, it was at last agreed and determin'd by Deed dated in the year 1269. that the Monks of Breton should pay a Pitance of 20s. per Annum to the Covent of Pontfract, that the Monks of Breton should freely choose their own Prior, but that he should be created or install'd by the Prior of Pontfract, etc. To this House were several Persons of great Quality, Benefactors; whose names and parcels by them given may be seen in the Book at large, p. 656, 657, 658, 659.

[Valued at 337 l. 14s. 8d. per Annum.]

MONK-BRETON, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Pontfract.

THIS Priory was founded to the glory of God and honour of St. Mary Magdalen of Lunda, by Adam the Son of Suanus who endow'd it with the Town of Breton, etc. The then Prior of the Charity (being the Capital House of this Order beyond Seas) granted that the Monks of this House, might choose their own Prior, the Prior of Pontfract (if required) being present at the Election. Adam Fitz Swane the Founder gave this House as a Cell to the Priory of St. John at Pontfract, and ordered this House to pay to that Priory a Recognition of one Mark of Silver per Annum. Pope Urban the III. confirm'd the Foundation 1186.

[Valued at 239 l. 3s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

THETFORD, in Norfolk.

FOunded Anno Dom. 1103. by Roger Bigot, whose Gifts and Endowments to this House were all confirm'd and ratified by his Son William Bigot Dapifer to the King; and also by King Henry the I. and King Henry the II. This Priory was made Denison 50. E. 3.

[Valued at 512 l. 14s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. I. CLUNIACS. 85

MONTACUTE, in Somersetshire.

FIRST founded by William Earl of Moriton in Normandy, who endowed this Priory with three fair Lordships, viz. Montegue and two others. King Henry the I. gave and confirm'd to God and the blessed Apostles St. Peter and St. Paul of Montacute, and the Cluniac Monks there, divers Lands, with great Liberties and Exemptions. The like did King Henry the II. and King Henry the III. in the four and thirtieth year of his Reign. King Edward the III. in the fourteenth year of Reign, granted the Advowson, and Custody of this Priory and four Cells thereunto belonging, to William de Monte-acuta Earl of Salisbury, and Marshal of England, and to his Heirs. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 909.

[Valued at 456 l. 14s. 7d. q. per Annum.]

DAVENTREY, in Northamptonshire.

THIS Priory was first founded at Preston by Hugh de Leycestre (call'd the Vicount) but that place being found inconvenient, they were by License of Simon de Seynliz the elder, Earl of Northampton, removed to Daventre, where he built a Monastery in honour of St. Augustine the Apostle of the English. King Henry the II. confirm'd their Liberties and Franchises granted by King Henry the I. to St. Mary of Charity (i.e., the Capital House of this Order beyond Seas) and to St. Augustine of Daventrey and the Monks there. Many were the Benefactors to this House, as Matilda de Senliz, Richard de Foxton, whose Daughter Ann was married to Alan Busset of Lusphenam (om. Roteland), Steven de Welton, Henry de Braybrok (whose Geneologies may be seen, Fo. 677, 678).

St. ANDREWS, at Northampton.

THIS Priory was founded in the eighteenth year of King William the Conqueror, by Simon de Seynliz, who came into England in the Army of that King. He married Maud, Daughter and Co-heir of Waldelsus, Earl of Huntington, with whom he had the honour of Huntington; Alice the other Daughter was by him given to Ralph de Tonny with 100 l. per Annum in Land (centum Librarum terrae) out of the said honour. In the Reign of King Henry the I. the said Simon made a Voyage to the Holy Land, and died in his return at the Monastery of the blessed Mary of charity (to which Monastery he had subjected this of St. Andrew). After his death King Henry, having married Maud Sister of Alexander King of Scotland, gave Maud Earl Simons Widow to David Brother of Alexander, and with her the Custody of Earl Simons Son and Heir, Simon de St. Lyz, junior. Hugh Bishop of Lincoln confirm'd the Churches and Tithes given to this Priory, among which were the Churches of Ryal and Exton in Rutland. King Henry the I. also confirm'd the Lands to them given, and granted them many Liberties and Franchises. This Priory was made Denison 6. H. 4.

To the Hospital of St. David at Kingsthorp built upon the Lands of this Priory, for the Relief of Travellers and poor People, Walter Prior of this House with the assent of his Convent, gave two yard Land and a

86 CLUNIACS. VOL. I.

Messuage, etc. in Thorp, constituting several Orders for the Government of the said Hospital, among others that there should be three rows of Beds placed in length before the Chappel, so as the Poor, and especially the sick People, might most conveniently hear Mass, etc. subjecting the said Hospital to the Prior of St. Andrews at Northampton, and the Abbot of Sullebi. This Deed bears date 1200. being the second of King John.

[This Priory was valued at 263 l. 7s. 1d. q. per Annum.]

BARNESTAPLE, in Devonshire.

THIS House was founded for Cluniac Monks, and dedicated to the honour of God, and our Lord Jesus Christ, and St. Mary, the holy Apostles St. Peter and St. Paul, and St. Mary Magdalen, by Joel Son of Alured, who endow'd it with large Possessions, subjecting it to the Church of St. Martin de Campis, in which he himself became a Monk. Confirm'd by King Henry the I. and by Henry de Tracy, who descended from the Founder, Anno 1146. (11. Steph.).

[Valued at 125 l. 6s. 7d in per Annum.]

TIKEFORD, in Buckinghamshire.

FUlcedius Paganellas was the first Founder of this Priory, who with other Benefactors, endowed it with divers Lands and Rents. All which together with a Court-Leet, King Henry the II confirm'd to the Monks here. King Edward the II. in the fifth year of his Reign, granted further to William de la Manerere then Prior of this House, and his Successors, to have a Pillory and Tumbrel in their Lordship of Tikeford, for the punishment of Malefactors. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 910.

FEVERSHAM, in Kent

Anno 1148. King Steven founded the Abby here to the honour of of our Saviour, and endow'd it with divers Mannors, Lands, Liberties, and free Customs to hold in perpetual Alms, discharged and quit of all secular Exactions. King Steven and Maud his Queen, and Eustacius their Son were buried here. King Henry the II. confirm'd to the Cluniac Monks of Feversham, all their Lands and Franchises, granting to them a Fair yearly for eight days beginning at the Feast of St. Peter ad vincula. The like confirmation was made by King John in the sixteenth year of his Reign; and by King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign. Peter Abbot of Clugny granted to King Steven, Clarembaldus then Prior of Bermondesey with twelve Monks of that House, for the Composing an Abby at Feversham, and at the same time absolved the said Clarembaldus and his Monks from all Obedience and Subjection to the Church of Clugny, and that of the Charity: The like Emancipation or discharge of subjection was also granted by the then Prior of the Charity.

[Valued at 286 l. 12s. 6d. ob. q. Per Annum.]

VOL. I. CLUNIACS. 87

ARTHINGTON, in Yorkshire.

THIS was a Priory, of Nuns, built and endow'd by Peers of Arthington, and confirm'd by Pope Alexander; as is set forth in an award made in the twenty eighth year of the Reign of King Henry the VI. Alicia de Romeli was a Benefactress to this Nunnery whose Gift was confirm'd by her Son William de Curcy the Kings Sewer, and by Warinus Fitz Gerald the King's Chamberlain.

[Valued at 11 l. 8s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

88 Vol. I.

Of the Cistercian Order.

Anno Dom. 1098. Robert Abbot of Molesme by License of Hugo Archbishop of Lyons the Pope's Legate, first instituted this Order, in a Desert Place called Cistercium in the Dutchy of Burgundy, the Rule of St. Bennet, being not duly observed, in his old Monastery. In this Order therefore they betook themselves to the strict observance of St. Bennet's Rule, and obtain'd great Priviledge from the Pope. To avoid Pride and Superfluity, they were to retain no Crosses of Gold or Silver, but only of Wood; their Chalices were to be of Silver and not of Gold, etc. The second Abbot of this Order was one Stephen an Englishman.

WAVERLEY, in Surrey.

THIS Abby was founded in the year of Christ 1128. by William Gifford Bishop of Winchester. The first Monks of this Order, being twelve and an Abbot, came to this House from a Foreign Abby call'd Elemosina. The said William Bishop of Winchester endow'd this House with divers Lands, and with Common in Farnham Woods, all which was by consent of the King, and the Convent of Winchester, and confirm'd by his Successors. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 912.

[Valued at 174 l. 8s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

FURNES, in Lancashire.

Anno Dom. 1127. being twenty nine years from the first Institution of the Cistercian Order (26. H. 1.) This House was founded by Steven Earl of Morton and Boloign, afterwards King of England.

The Names of the Abbots of FURNES.

1. Evanus de Albrincis.
2. Eudo de Sourdeval.
3. Michael de Lancastria.
4. Petrus de Eboraco.
5. Richardus de Bajocis.
6. Johannes de Cawnesfeild.
7. Walterus de Millum.
8. Jostenus de Pennington.
9. Conanus de Bardoule.
10. Willielmus Niger.
11. Giraldus Bristaldon.
12. Michael de Dalton.
13. Richardus de Sancto Quintino.
14. Radulfus de Fletcham.
15. Johannes de Newby.
16. Stephanus de Alverston.
17. Nicholaus de Meaux, who was after Bishop of Sodor.
18. Robertus de Denton.
19. Laurentius de Acclom.
20. Willielmus de Midleton.
21. Hugo de Bron.
22. Willielmus de Cockeram.
23. Hugo Skiller.
24. Johannes de Cockeram.
25. Alexander de Walton.
26. Johannes de Cockham.
27. Johannes de Bolton.
28. Willielmus de Dalton.

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 89

King Stevens double Relation to Maud the Empress.

Steven Earl of Morton, etc. was Son of Steven E. of Bloys, and Adela Daughter of K. William the Conqueror, and Sister of K.H.I. married Maud [1]

Edgar Edling had two Sisters, Christiana [2], and Margaret [3], who had issue as follows,

Christiana [2]

Eustace E. - Mary of Bolon

Maud [1]

William Earl of Warren and Bolon.

Margaret [3] Wife of Malcolm K. of Scots.

Matilda Wife of Hen. I. K. of Eng.

Maud, first married to the Emperor, then to Jeoffery Earl of Anjou, by which last she had issue, Henry and Mary.

Hen. the II. K. of Eng.

William de Lancaster, the third of that Name was a great Benefactor to this Abby, as appears by his Deeds dated 1240. etc. Which William married Agnes de Brus and had issue, Halewisa, Alicia and Sorota,

Halewisa ux. Petri de Brus, Alicia ux. Williel. de Lindesey, Sorota ux. Alani de Multon.

Pope Eugenius granted to John Abbot of St. Marys of Furnes, among other Priviledges that they should not pay any Tithes for their Lands or Cattel held in their own hands and occupation. And (Anno Dom. 1305.) it was agreed between the Abbot of Furnes and the Prior of St. Mary of Lancaster (which last was intituled to the Tithes of their Grange of Bellomonte) that in case the Abbot of Furnes let the said Lands, then the Prior of Lancaster should receive Tithes of the Lands so let, but in case the Abbot and Covent of Furnes should occupy the same in their own hands, then the said Prior to receive only a Pension of two Marks per Annum.

[Valued at 805 l. 16s. 5d. per Annum.]

90 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

RUSSIN, in the Isle of Man, a Cell to Furnes.

THE Abby of Russin was founded in the year 1134. Olanus King of Man, a very devout Prince, gave the Land whereon this Abby stands to Yvo then Abbot of Furnes, for the erecting of this Monastery.

Certain Antient Synodals, and Ecclesiaslical Constitutions for the Isle of Man, made by Simon Bishop of Sodor 1229.

Other Constitutions made in the Church of St. Bradan in Man 1291. under Mark Bishop of Sodor.

Other Additional Constitutions made in the Church of St. Michael the Archangel, by William Russel Bishop of Sodor, and the whole Clergy of Man 1350. All which see at large in the Monasticon.

Thomas Lord Stanley, Earl of Darby, and K. of the Isle of Man by his Letters Patents dated at Lathum, 28 Mar 1505. confirm'd to Ruan then Bishop of Sodor and his Successors, all the Lands, Revenues, Rights and Priviledges belonging to the Church in the Isle and Kingdom of Man.

YNES, in Ireland, a Cell to Furnes.

THIS was first founded in the year 1126. by a King of Ulster named Magnellus Makenlese, in a place call'd Erynach but that being almost destroyed in the Wars, it was translated by John de Curcy Conqueror of Ulster, and new founded at Ynes, and at the same time he subjected this Abby to Furnes, Anno 1180.

NETHE, in Glamorganshire.

Richard de Grainvilla gave to God and the Church of the holy Trinity at Savigny, Nethe and other Lands and Possessions to the Inventre on that the Abbot and Convent of Savigny should institute here a Convent of Monks under an Abbot. King John confirm'd the said Lands to the Church of the Holy Trinity at Nethe and the Monks there, in the ninth year of his Reign granting them also many Priviledges and Immunities.

[Valued at 132 l. 7s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

BASINGWERK Abby, in Flintshire.

FOunded Anno 1131. by Ranulph Earl of Chester, confirm'd by King Henry the II. and by Lewellin Prince of North-Wales. The like Confirmation to this Monastery, and the Monks here was made by David Prince of Northwales, Son of the foresaid Lewelin, who also gave them certain Lands and Revenues, in the year 1240.

[Valued at 150 l. 7s. 3d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. di

TINTERN, in Wales.

FOunded 1131. William, Mareschal of England, and Earl of Pembroke, in the seventh year of Henry the III. confirm'd to God, and the blessed Mary of Tintern, and to the Abbot and Monks there, all the Lands and Revenues given to them by his Ancestors; granting also to the said Abby great Liberties and immunities: prohibiting all Men to vex or disturb them or theirs, under the penalty of twenty Marks, besides the curse of God. Their Estate was also confirm'd by Roger Bigod Earl of Norfolk and Mareschal of England, Anno 1301. Walter Fitz Richard appears to be the Founder of this House Anno 1131. Who dying without issue, his Brother Gilbert Strongbowe became his Heir, and was the first Earl of Pembroke, from whom descended Isahel; she became the Wife of William Mareschall, who died 1219. and lies buried in the Temple at London: he left five Sons all successively Earls of Pembroke, but they all died without issue, Matilda the eldest of their Sisters and Co-heirs, was married to Hugh le Bigod Earl of Norfolk and Suffolk, etc.

[Valued at 192 l. 1s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

RIEVALL, in Yorkshire.

ANno 1132. Gualterus Especk a Great man in the Court of King Henry the I. founded this Monastery in a place called Blachomour near the River Rie, for the receipt of certain Monks of the Cistercian Order sent over by Bernard Abbot of Clarevallis, whose first Abbot was William.

This Walter Especk, having unhappily lost his Son and Heir who broke his Neck by a fall trom a Horse, built and endow'd with part of his Estate three Monasteries, viz Kirkham, Rievall, and Wardon. The rest of his Estate was divided between his three Sisters and Co-heirs, one of which married to Peter Lord Roos, the Descent of which Noble family, the reader may see set forth in the Book at large, with their several Matches and Issue, down to George Mannors, Lord Roos, who died Anno 1513.

Many were the Benefactors, and large the Possessions of this Monastery, exprest Fol. 729, 730, 731.

Pope Alexander the III. by his Bull dated 1140. granted to Aelredo Abbot of St. Marys of Rievalle and his Brethren, and their Successors in that Monastery, a Confirmation of all their Possessions, with divers Priviledges, in particular that they might celebrate the Divine Offices in the time of a general Interdict, etc.

[Valued at 278 l. 10s. 2d. per Annum.]

FOUNTAINS, in Yorkshire, a Cell of Clarevallis. Founded 1132.

THE Rule and Discipline of St. Benedict being relaxt in the Abby of St. Mary's at York, and a great Dissention happening therein on that occasion between the Abbot and Prior, Turstin then Archbishop of York gave leave to thirteen of the Monks to retire from the said Abby. To these the said Archbishop appointed a Solitary, and then Desert place

92 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

for their Habitation, at that time called Skeldale, since Fountains. Here for a time a great Elme was their only fence from the Weather, under which they slept, fed, and performed their Offices according to their Rule. Richsrd, who had been their Prior at York, being elected their first Abbot and confirm'd by the Archbishop Turstin aforesaid. They having past a Winter in this manner, sent to the holy Bernard Abbot of Claravellis submitting themselves to his Rule and Direction. Abbot Bernard sends back with the Messengers one of his Monks named Galfridus who taught them the Cistercian Discipline. Hitherto they were in great Want, being forced to dress for their Food the Leaves of the Trees and Herbs of the Fields. Yet in their distress having in their poor House but two Loaves and a half, they gave one of them to a Poor man who demanded an Alms for Christ his sake. Two years they labour'd under this grievous Poverty; after which God sent them many Benefactors, the first of which was Hugh Dean of York. Five years after the first Foundation of the Monastery of Fountains, a certain Nobleman called Ranulph de Merlay built for them a new Monastery to which they sent some of their Monks under the Government of Abbot Robert formerly a Monk at Witheby. Besides which, many Cells were founded and given to this House, as Woburne, Kirkstall, Bitham, otherwise called Vallis dei, Lisa in Norway etc.

Benefactors to this House were Alanus de Aldeburg; Roger de Mubrai de Aldeburg, Swanus de Tornetun, de Bramicia, Roger de Laci Constable of Chester, Nigellus de Mubrai, Alice de Gant, etc. who gave to God and the Church of St Mary de Fontibus divers Mannors and Lands. All which were confirm'd to the Monks of the Cistercian Order here, and their Successors for ever by King Richard the I.

[Valued at 998 l. 6s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

QUARRE (Quarrera) in the Isle of Wight, a Cell to Savigny. Founded 1132.

RIchard Earl of Exeter, Son of Baldwin, confirm'd to God, the holy Virgin, and Gaufridus Abbot of Savigny, this House and divers Lands and Revenues thereunto belonging, first given by his Father. Benefactors to this House were Henry Fitz-Empress, who writ himself Son of the Duke of Normandy and Earl of Anjou, Engelgerius de Bohun; William de Vervun Earl of Devon, etc.

Controversie arising between the Abbot and Covent of Lyra, and this Church of Quarre about certain Tithes and Revenues in and about Carisbrok, and other Neighbouring Towns here in this Island, the Matter was agreed and settled by Deed dated in the year 1289.

[Valued at 134 l. 3s. 11d. per Annum.]

CUMBERMERE, in Cheshire. Founded 1133.

HUgo Malbanc founded this Abby in the Honour of the blessed Virgin, and St. Michael, and endow'd it with very large Lands and Possessons; among others, with the fourth part of the Town of Wiche, and the Tithes of the Salt and Boylries there. Yet by the same Deed he granted

VOL. CISTERCIANS. 93

that Ralph Earl of Chester his chief Lord, should be accounted the Principal Founder and Defender of the said Church and Monks there. King Henry the III. in the sixteenth year of his Reign, confirm'd all their Possessions, and again in the fiftieth year of his Reign. In the year 1230. Ralph Earl of Chester confirm'd their Estate given by Hugo Malbanc, and granted them several Liberties and Immunities. Vid. 2. Vol. p. 913.

[Valued at 225 l. 9s. 7d. per Annum.]

GEROUDON, in Leicestershire.

THIS was founded Anno 1133. as a Cell to Waverle. The Founder, Robert Earl of Leicester, endow'd this Monastery with all his Lands in Disseley, and with the Wood of Shepehed. Many were the Benefactors who gave to this Church of St. Mary of Geroldon, and the Monks here large Possessions, viz. Margaret Countess of Wynton Sister of the said Robert, Margaret de Ferrariis Countess of Derby, Roger de Quincy, Gilbert de Coleville, William Son of Richard Wareyn, William Peverell, etc. All whose Gifts were confirm'd to them by King Edward the III. in the fourteenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 159 l. 19s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

SWINESHEAD, in Lincolnshire. Founded Anno Dom. 1134.

THIS was founded and endow'd by Robert Greslei; whose several Lands and Possessions were recited and confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Mary of Swynesheved and the Monks there, by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 167 l. 15s. 3d. per Annum.]

CALDER, in Cumberland. Founded Anno Dom. 1134.

KING Henry the II. confirmed to the Abbot and Monks here all the Lands and Possessions given by Ralph de Meschin their Founder and other Benefactors.

[Valued at 50 l. 9s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

BILAND, in Yorkshire. Founded Anno Dom. 1134.

THIS House was at first founded for certain Monks of Savigny, by Roger de Mulbray; which Roger died in the Holy Land. Walter de Scislings Parson of Kildale, Hugo de Wake, and others were Benefactors. In the ninth of Richard the II. Thomas Earl Mareschall and Earl of Nottingham, Lord Mowbray and Segrave, did by his Deed recite, ratifie, and confirm the Foundation of this Abby by his said Progenitor Roger de Mulbray. Vid. infra, p. 1027.

[Valued at 238 l. 9s. 4d. per Annum.]

94 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

BILDWAS, in Shropshire. Founded Anno 1135.

KING Steven in the third year of his Reign (Anno Dom. 1139) gave and confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Ceadde and to the Abbot and Monks here, their Estate in like manner as Roger Bishop of Chester had given it, and further, granted them several Immunities. Walter de Dunstanville, Robert Corbet, and others were Benefactors. Their Estate was confirm'd to them by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign.

Vid. Vol. 2. p. 914.

[Valued at 110 l. 19s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

St. Mary's near Dublin, in Ireland, a Cell to Bildwas. Founded 1139.

KING Henry the II. confirm'd to the white Monks of St. Mary's near Dublin, all their Lands and Possessions; and by another Deed subjected the said Monks to the Abbot of Bildewas.

BITLESDEN, in Buckinghamshire. Founded Anno 1147.

THE Lordship of Bitlesden escheating in the time of King Steven, from one Robert de Meperteshall, to the then Earl of Leicester, the said Earl granted it to his Steward Ernaldus de Bosco, who founded here an Abby, which the Earl also confirm'd; but after some time the abovesaid Robert de Meperteshal being about to commence a Suit in Law for this Estate, the Monks here in consideration of ten Marks obtain'd from the said Robert also a Charter of Confirmation. This House was first given by the abovesaid Arnold de Bosco for a Cell to the Abby of Geroudon.

[Valued at 125 l. 4s. 3d. q. per Annum.]

WARDON, in Bedfordshire. Founded Anno 1136.

THE first Founder of this House was Walter Espec, who endow'd it for Monks from the Abby of Rieval, which was confirm'd by King Steven Anno Dom. 1135. and by King Richard the I. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 389 l. 16s. 6d. q. per Annum.]

FORD, in Devonshire.

IN the year 1133. Richard Viscount or Sheriff of Devonshire, a near Kinsman of King William the Conqueror, and to whom that King had given the Castle of Exeter, and Honour and Barony of Okehampton in Devonshire, gave his Land of Brightley, within the said Honour of Okehampton for the founding of an Abby, and obtained twelve Monks for the same from the Abby of Waverly. These Monks having remained at Brightley for five years, were at last forced through the great want and

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 95

sterility of the place, to return back to Waverly: Which the Sister and Heiress of their Founder seeing, she gave them the Mannor of Thorncomb for their maintenance, and her house therein, then called Ford, for their more convenient habitation. From this Lady did descend Hawisa who was married to Reginald de Courtnay, who was the Grandson of Lewis the Gross of France, from whom descend the noble Family of Courtnays, Patrons of this Abby, and great Benefactors. Whose descent and lineage is set forth in the Book at large. One of which Family, namely the Lord John Courtnay was, through the divine Mercy, his great Faith, and his Hope in the Prayers of these Monks, miraculously delivered from a terrible Storm at Sea in the Night time, when all the Seamen despair'd of life. Hugh Courtnay the second of that name, became Earl of Devonshire, and died 9. E. 3. Joseline de Pomerei, and others, were Benefactors to this Monastery; all whose gifts are confirm'd by King Richard I. in the first year of his Reign.

[Valued at 374 l. 10s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

BUCKFAST in Devonshire.

FOunded for Monks and endowed with Lands by Richard Banzan to hold by the 30th. part of a Knight's Fee, and confirmed by King Henry II.

[Valued at 466 l. 11s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

MEAUX, in Yorkshire. Founded, Anno 1136.

MEaux was so called by its Inhabitants, who came into England with the Norman Conqueror, and named their new Seat according to the name of the City of Meaux in Normandy from whence they came. The Founder of this Abby was William le Gross Earl of Albemarl, and Lord of Holderness, and in a manner of all Yorkshire; who having vow'd a Journey to Jerusalem and being by reason of his age, and unweildyness of his Body, not well able to perform such a Voyage, built this Monastery by way of commutation of his Vow. This he gave to God and the Blessed Virgin Mary, introducing a Convent of Monks from the Monastery of Fountains, of whom one Adam was made the first Abbot; which Monks at first got their living by the work of their hands and sweat of their brows: but were not long after plentifully endow'd with Lands and Revenues by the said Earl. This William le Gross was Grandson of Odo to whom William the Conqueror gave his Sister in marriage, and the Isle of Holderness; the Archbishop of Roan gave him the County of Albemarl to hold of him by the Service of being his Standard Bearer in his Expeditions attended with ten Knights. The Line of this William being not long after extinct, the County of Albemarl, and honour of Holderness escheated to the Crown for want of heirs. This Monastery was begun, and the Monks first entered there under their Abbot Adam, on the Calends of January 1150. Richard de Ottingham Rector of the Church of Schelford in the Diocess of Ely, by his Deed dated, Anno Dom. 1317. gave divers Lands to the Abbot and Convent here for the maintenance of a perpetual Chantery of seven Monks of this house, at the Porch of their Abby Church. The number of the Monks in this Abby were 50. The Lands given to this Abby were confirm'd to it by King John, in the 6th. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 299 l. 6s. 4d. q. per. Annum.]

96 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

NEW-MINSTER, near Morpeth, in Yorkshire.

THIS was founded and endow'd in the year 1138. by a certain Nobleman call'd Ranulf de Merley, it was furnisht with Monks from the Abby of Fountains. Their Lands were confirm'd to them by King Henry the III. in the thirty ninth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 916.

TAME, in Oxfordshire. Founded 1138.

THIS House was founded and endow'd by Sir Robert Gait a Knt. and was furnisht with Cistercian Monks from Waverley. Their Estate was confirm'd to them by King Henry II. in the eleventh year of his Reign, and by King Edward the II. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 256 l. 13s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

BORDESLEY, in Worcestershire. Founded Anno 1138.

THis Abby was founded by Mawd the Empress for Cistercian Monks, in honour of the most blessed Virgin Mary (Regina Caelorum, so are the words of her Charter). Endowing it with divers Lands and Revenues to hold free and quit of all Secular Service. Besides whom, many other Benefactors conferr'd upon this Abby great Possessions, all which were confirm'd by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign.

[Valued at 388 l. 9s. 10d. ob. q. per Annum.]

LOUTH-PARK in Lincolnshire. Founded Anno 1139.

THe Founder of this Monastery was Alexander Bishop of Lincoln, who procured Monks for it from the Abby of Fountains, but their first Settlement being at a place called Haverholm, which Seat not being convenient for their Habitation, he removed them from thence to this Place. Besides the said Bishop they had divers other Benefactors, all whose donations were confirm'd to God, and St. Mary, and the Monks de Parcho-Lude, by King Henry the III. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 147 l. 14s. 6d. per Annum.]

KIRKSTED, in Lincolnshire.

THIS House was founded in the year 1139. by Hugh de Bretone a Baron of those times, and by him endow'd with divers Lands. Other Benefactors were the Furnevalls, D'Aencurts, and D'arci's, etc. Richard de Luvetot gave and annext to this House the Hermitage of St. John in the Parish of Ecclesfeild, with the Land thereunto belonging. Conan Duke of Britain and Earl of Richmund gave to this Abby the Church of Gaiton with two Carucates and a half of Land, etc.

[Valued at 286 l. 2s. 7d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 97

KINGSWOOD, in Gloucestershire. Founded, Anno 1139.

THis House was founded by William de Berkeley for Cistercian Monks, and the Foundation confirm'd by Maud the Empress: but afterwards for many years it became a Grange depending on the Abby of Tetebiry, and a long contest was had about this Matter, till at last it was from a Grange advanced to the name of the Abby of Kingeswode. The Lands and Endowments given to this Abby by the Founder, were confirm'd by several of the Berkleys, his noble Descendants.

[Valued at 244 l. 11s. 2d. per Annum.]

PIPWELL, in Northamptonshire.

THis Monastry was first founded. Anno Dom. 1143. (and then called Sancta Maria de Divisis), among thick Woods, which were in after times destroyed. In the year 1323 the Monks here were dispersed thro' Poverty. Their first Founder was William Boutevileyn of Cottesbrook; from whom descende done Robert Boutevileyn, who did many unkindnesses to these Monks. This was before their dispersion. Hugh Senlize and Emma his Wife one of the Daughters and Heirs of the Lord of Braybroke, gave to the Monks of Pipwell divers Lands and Tenements in Braybroke, confirm'd by the Capital Lord of the Fee Simon de Foxton, and these seem to be the second Founders. King Heury III. granted to these Monks pasture on Benifield Laund for 250 Cattle.

[Valued at 286 l. 11s. 8d. q. per Annum.]

STONELEY, in Warwickshire.

MAud the Empress first founded the Priory of Rademere in the Forest Kanoc, confirmed by King Steven. This Priory was afterwards advanced to an Abby of Cistercian Monks by Henry Fitz Empress then Duke of Normandy. In the year 1154. which was thirteen years after the Monks had remained at Rademore, the foresaid Henry Fitz Empress, being now King of England, they changed their habitation of Radmore for Stanley, and the whole Lordship of the same, which was before that the Kings Demesn. The first stone of the Abby Church there was laid on the Ides of April, Anno Dom. 1154. The said King Henry I. endow'd this House with divers other Lands and Revenues elsewhere.

[Valued at 151 l. 0s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

COGESHAL, in Essex.

THis Abby was founded by King Steven and Maud his Queen, in the year 1142. William de Humberstane, with the Kings License, gave the Mannor of Tyllingham-Hall for the finding of one Wax light to burn before the High Altar at the Abby Church here in the time of high Mass,

98 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

daily. The Monks of this House were endowed with great Immunities.

[Valued at 251 l. 2s. per Annum.]

REVESBY, in Lincolnshire. Founded Anno 1142.

THe Founders of this House were William de Romara, Earl of Lincoln, and William his Son, who gave to the Abbot and Monks of Rievalle, Revesby, Thoresby, and other Lands in Lincolnshire for the building and endowment of this House. This Abby was dedicated to St. Laurence. The Lands and Revenues were confirm'd by Ralph Earl of Chester, and by King Richard I. in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 287 l. 2s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

CUMHIRE, in Pembrokeshire

THis House was founded by Cadwathel ap Madok in the year 1143, for Sixty White Monks. King Henry III. in the sixteenth year of his Reign confirm'd to these Monks all their Lands and Revenues.

[Valued at 24 l. 19s. 4d. per Annum.]

BOXLEY in Kent.

William de Ipre a great Commander in King Stevens Army founded this Abby of Boxley for White Monks in the year 1144. King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign confirm'd their Estate with Sac and Soc.

[Valued at 204 l. 4s. 11d. per Annum.]

SINNINGTHWAIT, in Yorkshire.

THis House was founded for Nuns, by Bertram Haget, and confirm'd by Roger de Mubrai his superiour Lord. Jeffery Archbishop of York, took these Nuns and their Possessions into his protection, and denounced a malediction against those who should dare to wrong them, and a blessing to their Benefactors. Alice Widow of Adam de Staneley gave, with her self, nine Bovates of Land in Berewik (super Theseiam) which was afterwards changed with Ranulf Fitz Henry for other Lands in Lofthows.

[Valued at 60 l. 9s. 2d. per Annum.]

ESSEHOLT, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Sinningthwait.

POpe Alexander the third, by his Bull dated in the year 1172. confirm'd to Christian Prioress of Sinningthwait, and the Nuns there, and their Successors, their House and Estate both at Sinningthayte, and at Esseholt, with all Lands already given, or to be given to their said Houses. With Priviledge of Sanctuary.

[Valued at 13 l. 5s. 4d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 99

WOBURN, in Bedfordshire. Founded Anno 1145.

THIS was founded and endowed by Hugh de Bolebock, by advice of Henry Abbot of Fountains, from whence a Convent of Monks was sent to this place. King John in the second year of his Reign confirmed the Estate of this House, so did also King Henry the II.

[Valued at 391 l. 18s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

MEREVAL, in Warwickshire. Founded Anno 1148.

THIS was founded by Robert Earl of Ferrariis, and by him endowed with all the Forest of Arden, with other Lands. All which was confirm'd By King Henry the II.

[Valued at 254 l. 1s. 8d. per Annum.]

HAMPOLE, in Yorkshire.

THIS House was founded for Nuns by Avicia de Tanai, and endowed by her with divers Lands of her Inheritance, all which were confirmed by Ralph de Tilli her Grandson, by Roger Archbishop of York, and by William Fitz William. Anno 1331.

[Valued at 63 l. 5s. 8d. per Annum.]

VALLE-DEI, alias Vaudey, in Lincolnshire.

THE Abby here was founded by William Earl of Albemarl in the year 1147. It was at first called Biham, but afterwards Vallis-dei, and was planted with Monks from Fountains. The same Founder, erected also the Abby of Meaux of which supra, p. 792. Many were the Benefactors to this House, among whom Gilbertus de Gant, Roger de Mulbray, etc. all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign. See the Genealogy of Gilbert de Gant Nephew of William the Conqueror, and the Noble Families descended from him in the Book at large.

[Valued at 124 l. 5s. 11d. q. per Annum.]

SWINE, in Yorkshire.

ERinburch de Burtona was the Foundress of this Abby, giving divers Lands of her Patrimony and Inheritance to God and the Church of St. Mary at Swine, and to the Brethren and Sisters there serving God. Pope Alexander exempted the Nuns here from paying Tithes for their Lands in their own Occupation. Vide infra, fol. 1026.

[Valued at 82 l. 5s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

100 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

BRURE, in Oxfordshire. Founded Anno 1147.

KING Henry the III. Roger Earl of Warwick, and others, were Benefactors to this Abby, all whose Gifts were confirm'd to the Cistercian Monks here, by King John in the sixth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 134 l. 10s. 10d. per Annum.]

RUPE, alias Roche, in Yorkshire. Founded Anno 1147.

RIchard de Bulli, and Richard Fitz Turgis, were joint Founders of this Abby. Besides those of the Family of Bully, the Monks here were endow'd with Lands and Revenues by other Benefactors, among whom Edmund de Lacy Constable of Chester, and William Earl Warren, etc. Pope Urban the III. confirmed their Estate and Lands given and to be given, and exempted them from Tithes for their Lands in their own Tenure and this was by his Bull dated 1186. Their first Abbot was:

1. Durandus, who governed twelve years.
2. Dionisius 12.
3. Rogerus de Tikehill 8.
4. Hugo de Waddeworth 5.
5. Osmundus 39.
6. Reginaldus 15.
7. Richardus 16.
8. Walter 14.
9. Alanus.
10. Jordanus.
11. Philippus.

[Valued at 224 l. 2s. 5d. per Annum.]

HOTON, in Yorkshire.

THIS House was founded for Nuns, and endow'd by Radulf de Nevil. With the Licenses of Adam de Brus, and Ernald de Percy.

BASEDALE, in Yorkshire.

JOhn de Ever by his Deed dated Anno 1304. released to Jean Prioress of Basedale, and to the Convent of the same, and their Successors, all homage and suit of Court for all their Lands holden of him in Kirby, Cliveland, and Ingelby. William de Percy and others were Benefactors to this Nunnery; all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King o Henry the III. in the twentieth year of his Reign. Robert de Longo Campo Abbot of St. Mary's at York and the Convent there, granted to these Nuns a Coemitery for themselves, but their Servants and Tenants to be buried at the Parish Church.

Guido de Bouincurt was the Founder of this Priory of Nuns.

[Valued at 20 l. 1s. 4d. per Annum.]

SALLEY, in Yorkshire.

THIS Abby was founded by William de Percy Anno Dom. 1147. Matilda de Percy Countess of Warwick, Daughter of the said William, was a great Benefactress to this Abby, and gave them the Church of Todcaster, and was accounted a second Founder; Agnes de Percy her Sister

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 101

and Heiress, did add to her bounty. William Vavasor gave and confirm'd all the Lands which his Father Milgarus Vavasor had given to this House, placing his Confirmation (una cum Corpore meo) together with his own body on the Altar of the blessed Mary de Sallay; providing thereby that in case he happens to die within the Kingdom of England, that his Body be buried in this Abby. John de Lacy Constable of Chester was among others a Benefactor to these Monks, Anno 1223. William de Percy who founded this Abby, was Grandson to William de Percy who came into England with the Conqueror. His Estate came to his two Daughters Matilda who was married to William Earl of Warwick, but died without issue, and Agnes married to Goseline Lovain, Brother to the Duke of Brabant, the issue of this Match kept the name of their Mothers Family, and are the Progenitors of the Earls of Northumberland. This Abby was wasted and part of it burnt down by the Scots in their Wars.

[Valued at 147 l. 11s. 10d. per Annum.]

RUFFORD, in Nottinghamshire. Founded 1148.

THIS Abby was founded and endowed by Gilbert de Gaunt Earl of Lincoln. Many were the Benefactors, whose Gifts were confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks here, with the Grant of divers Priviledges in the Forest of Shirewood, by King Henry the III. in the thirty sixth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 176 l. 11s. 6d. per Annum.]

SALTRE, in Huntingdonshire. Founded, Anno 1147.

Simon Earl of Northampton founded and endowed this Abby with all his Land at Saltre, and with all the Marish Ground between that and Witlemare, and in Witlemare, etc. With very large Immunities and Franchises, such as his Ancestor Judith Countess of Huntington (Neice of the Conqueror) had formerly obtain'd of her said Unkle for this Town and Lordship of Saltre, as (inter alia) to be exempt from the County and Hundred Courts, to find neither Man nor Arms for the War, etc. The abovesaid Countess Judith had a special Love for this place, and did very much frequent it, and on that account did obtain from her said Unkle as great and large Priviledges as could then be granted for this Lordship. Which Priviledges, and also the Limits and Bounds of the Estate of this Abby, are particularly and at large set forth in the Monasticon. Controversie arising between the Abbot of Ramsey and the Abbot of Saltre, about their Rights in Withlesmare and Ulbemare, the matter was determin'd by a final Concord before the Kings Justices at Huntedon, Anno 3. Rich. the I.

[Valued at 141 l. 3s. 8d. per Annum.]

KIRKSTALL, in Yorkshire.

THIS Abby was first founded by Henry de Laceio in the year 1147. and first instituted with a Convent of Monks under their Abbot

102 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

Alexander from the Abby of Fountains. Their first Habitation was at a Town call'd Bernolswick, but this place proving to these Monks very inconvenient on divers accounts, after they had been here somewhat above six years, they removed to a place called Kirkestall, in a Vally called Aierdale, which place was then only inhabited by some Hermits; This last Seat they obtain'd of William Pictvensis who own'd the Soil, at the yearly Rent of five Marks. Their first Abbot Alexander govern'd the Monks here thirty five years, and after his death was succeeded by Radulfus Hageth, and after him Abbot Lambert, to whom succeed Abbot Helias, who at first was refused by the then Patron Roger de Lacy, but became afterwards much in his favour. King John did some ill Offices to this Abby in taking from them some of their Lands. Robert de Lacy, who died Anno 1194. was accounted a second Founder of this Abby.

King William the Conqueror gave to Ilbertus de Lacy, who came into England in his Army, all Blackburnshire (in the County of York) with the Lordship and Honour of Pontfract, and other Lands. This Ilbertus built the Castle at Pontefract, and in it a Chappel for a Dean and Canons. Son of this Ilbertus was Robert Lacy who built the Monastery of Pontefract, who was the Father of Henry Lacy the Founder of this Abby of Kirkstall, this Henry married the Sister of William Vesci Rector of Berwick. Of this Family was Roger Constable of Chester, who hearing that his Lord Ranulphus Earl of Chester was distrest in Wales, raised on the sudden a great Force among the Shoo-makers and Stage-players of Chester, and with them went and relieved his Lord from the Power of the Welch; whereupon the said Earl Ranulph granted to him and his Heirs the Dominion and Patronage of the Shoo-makers and Players at Chester for ever. His Son and Heir John de Lacy became the first Earl of Lincoln of this name, Anno Dom. 1221. and died 1240. From the Heirs General of this Family did descend Our Kings of the House of Lancaster.

[Valued at 329 l. 2s. 11d. per Annum.]

DORE, in Herefordshire.

RObert Earl of Ferrars founded this Monastery, and endowed it with Lands, to hold free and quit of all secular Service, by the Rent of three shillings yearly to be paid at the Feast of St. Peter advincula: and this was exprest to be given not only for the Health of the Souls of his Ancestors and Heirs, but also (pro pace & stabilitate totius Angliae & Walliae) for the Peace and Stability of all England and Wales. King John by his Deed dated in the seventeenth year of his Reign gave divers Lands to the Church of the blessed Mary at Dore and the Cistercian Monks there. Walter de Clifford and others were Benefactors. All whose Gifts were confirm'd to this House by King Henry the III. in the seventeenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 918.

[Valued at 101 l. 5s. 2d. per Annum.]

SIBETON, in Norfolk. Founded Anno 1150.

THIS Abby was founded and endowed by William Son of Robert Fitz Walter. The Lands given to the Monks here were confirm'd

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 103

by King Steven and King Henry the II. The said Robert Fitz-Walter was the Founder of the House of St. Faith's at Horsham, and married Sibill Daughter of Radulfus de Cayneto, who came into England with the Conqueror; from whom descended the Families of Cressi and Ufford.

Vid. Vol 3. p. 32.

[Valued at 250 l. 15s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

STANLEIGH, in Wiltshire.

THIS Abby was first founded by Maud the Empress at Lokeswell in the year 1151. and three years afterwards translated to Stanlegh, by her Son King Henry the II. The Monks of this House came from Quarre in the Isle of Wight. King Richard the II. confirm'd to them all their Lands, and took them into his protection.

[Valued at 177 l. 0s. 8d. per Annum.]

JERVAL, in Yorkshire.

AKarius Fitz-Bardolf (a potent man in Yorkshire, in the time of King Steven) gave to Peter de Quinciaco, and certain other Monks of Savigny, a parcel of Land in Wandesleydale, for the erection of an Abby of their Order, which Abby was at first call'd Fors, and afterward Jorvalle. This Foundation was confirm'd by Alan Earl of Britan and Richmond, which Earl Alan, being present at the beginning of the Erection of the first Buildings, prevailed with several of his Knights to be assistant to the Work, and this was in the year 1145. Roger de Molbray gave also divers Lands to this House before his first Voyage to Jerusalem. The abovesaid Peter inhabited this House at first with only two Companions labouring with their hands for their sustentation, but in a while they had of the said Earl of Richmond's Gift, five Plows, forty Cows, sixteen Horses, three hundred Sheep, etc. After this Serlo Abbot of Savigny (having a property in this House of Jorevalls by reason that the first Monks came from thence) granted the same to the Abby of Biland. Whereupon the foresaid Peter submitted himself and Companions being two Monks and one Lay-brother (conversus) to the Abbot of Biland. Being fully possest of this House, Roger Abbot of Biland appointed John de Kinstan to be Abbot here, instituting him in these words, I confirm thee Abbot, and I commit to thee the care of Souls and the Government of the Abby of Joreval, with all its substance Persons and Possessions now had or to be had, as well in Temporals as Spirituals, in like manner as Serlo Abbot of Savigny gave the farm to me. And then put into his hands the Rule of St. Benedict, etc. Anno 1150. Hereupon the said Abbot appointed to be of his Convent, the aforesaid Peter and his two Companions, with nine Monks of Biland, who removed from thence to Jorvall. After this the abovesaid Earl Alan, and his Son Conan Duke of Britan encreased their Revenues, with the Gift of many other Lands. In the year 1156. the said Conan translated these Monks from Fors, the place being poor and steril, to East-Witton, upon the River Jor, and this was by permission and approbation of the Abbot of Cisteaux and the general Convent of that Order. Alanus Earl of Britan, who was so great a Benefactor to this

104 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

Monastery, was Brother and Heir to Alanus Rufus, who was the Son of Eudo Earl of Britan, who came into England with King William the Conqueror and had given him by the said King Richmondshire. Anno 1268, John Duke of Britan and Earl of Richmond, confirm'd the Donations of his Ancestors. So also did King Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 254 l. 18s. 5d. per Annum.]

GREENFEILD, in Lincolnshire.

RAdulf de Aby gave Lands here and elsewhere for the Foundation and Endowmentof a Nunnery in Greenfeild; which was confirm'd by Hugh Bishop of Lincoln, and Eudo de Greinesby, etc. John Son and Heir of Adam de Welle gave to this House 10 l. per Annum for the finding of two aufficient Chaplains to celebrate for him, and his Ancestors, and all the faithful in our Ladies Chappel in the Priory Church here for ever, to the finding of which Margaret then Prioress of this House did oblige her Successors by her Deed dated Anno Dom. 1348.

[Valued at 63 l. 4s. 1d. per Annum.]

CUMB, in Warwickshire.

Richard de Camvilla gave Lands to the Abbot and Monks of Waverley, for the founding of this Abby of Cistercian Monks. Roger de Moubray confirm'd the Estate so given, to the Monks of Cumb, quit of all secular service.

[Valued at 311 l. 15s. 1d. per Annum.]

STRATFORD-LANGTON, in Essex.

FOunded Anno 1135. for Monks by William de Montefichet, endow'd with all the Lordship for Stradford in Westham, etc. All which Gifts were confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 511 l. 16s. 3d. per Annum.]

FLEXLEY, in Gloucestershire.

THE Abby here was founded and endow'd by Roger Earl of Hereford, their Lands were confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 112 l. 13s. 1d. per Annum.]

BLANCLAND, in Wales.

THIS was founded by John de Toryton: The Lands given to these Monks were recited and confirm'd by King John in the sixteenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 918.

[Valued at 135 l. 3s. 6d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 105

HOLMCOLTRUM, in Cumberland. Founded Anno 1150.

King Henry II. seems to have been the Founder of this Abby, King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign confirm'd their Lands, as did also K. Henry III. in the 39. year of his Reign. John Gernoun and Margaret, his Wife, founded and endow'd a Chantry in this Abby Church for four Chaplains, Monks of this House, and two secular Chaplains. This John then held two parts of the Mannor of Wyggeton, by Cornage. As was found by Inquisition, 6. E. 3. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 34.

[Valued at 427 l. 19s. 3d. ob. q. per Annum.]

TARENT, in Dorsetshire.

THis Abby was founded for Nuns of the Cistercian Order, by Richard Bishop of Durham. Joan Queen of Scots gave to this House (cum corpore suo) with her Body, Lands in Stanton in Cambridgeshire to the value of 20 l. per Annum. All the Estate belonging to this Monastery was confirm'd by King Henry III. who was also himself a Benefactor.

[Valued at 215 l. 7s. 9d. per Annum.]

TILTEY, alias Wudeham, in Essex.

FOunded Anno 1152. This was first given by Maurice Son of Jeffery de Teretia to the Canons of the Church of St. John Baptist of Wodeham, and endow'd with several Lands, confirm'd by King Henry II. After wards King Richard the first confirm'd the same Estate to the Monks here settled of the Cistercian Order, in the tenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 167 l. 2s. 6d. per Annum.]

DEULACRES, in Cheshire.

ANno 1153. The Abby of Pulton in Cheshire was founded by Robert Pincerna, it was furnisht with Monks of the Cistercian Order from Cumbermere, and was therefore called a Daughter of that House. In the year 1214. the Convent was translated from Pulton to Deulacres by Ralph Earl of Chester. This Ralph afterwards coming from his Expedition in the Holy Land, was in a great Storm at Sea in the Night, confident of deliverance at Midnight, through the Suffrages of these Monks, then at their Nocturnal Devotions, accordingly the Storm did then begin to cease to the wonder of the Seamen. This Ralph and his Successors Earls of Chester gave and confirm'd divers Lands and Possessions to this Abby. Vid. Vol. 2. pag. 919.

CLUNOKVAUR, in Wales.

THe Original of this Monastery was by S. Benow of whom mention is made in the Life of St. Winefrid. The White Monks here were of a

106 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

newer Foundation. Guithin, Unkle to one of the Princes of Northwales gave the Village of Clunok to Benow. Vide Vol. 2. pag. 119.

STRIATFLURE, in Cardiganshire.

FOunded and endowed with divers Lands by Reese Prince of South-wales. The Estate of this House, (called also Strata florida) was confirm'd by King Henry II. and King Edward I.

[Valued at 118 l. 7s. 3d per Annum.]

LEGBURN, in Lincolnshire.

THis Abby was founded for Nuns by Robert de Lekeburn, who was buried in the Chapter house of this Nunnery; at whose Interment, his Son and Heir William, declared publickly his confirmation of his Fathers Donations and Endowments, adding of his own gift the yearly Rent of two shillings in Franckalmoign. King John in the first year of his Reign confirm'd the Estate of this House.

[Valued at 38 l. 8s. 4d. per Annum.]

STRATMARGEL, or Strata-Marcella, in Montgomeryshire.

FOunded Anno 1170. by Madock ap Griffin; By his Deed dated Anno 1222. he endowed it with divers Lands and Revenues.

[Valued at 64 l. 14s. 2d. per Annum.]

STANLAW, in Cheshire. Founded Anno 1172.

THe first Founder of this House was John Constable of Chester, who endowed it with divers Lands and Liberties, his Deed bears date 1178. These Monks of Stanlaw were afterwards translated to the Church of Whaley, at which the Abbot and Convent of Salley in Yorkshire were very much grieved, alledging among other things that they were nigher to their Abby than the Constitutions of their Order do allow of, and that it was to their damage 27 l. 10s. But the differences were composed in the year 1305. by the Abbots of Ryvalle and Belland. The Church of Whaley was in being in the time when St. Augustine the Monk came into England. The Rectors of which Church were in after times called Deans and not Parsons, and were married men, who also had the ordinary Jurisdiction of the place committed to them by the Bishop. These Deans had an Estate of inheritance in the Church of Whaly, and the Chappels, which went from Father to Son, and the Cure of the Churches was supplied by certain Priests, whom the Deans provided and presented to the Bishop for his License. The Names of these Deans may be seen in the Book at large. But after the Council of Lateran (1215.) it was no longer permitted that this Church should go as an inheritance. Not long after this the Church of Whaley was given by Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln,

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 107

and Lord of Biagbornshire, to the Monks of Stanlaw, who enter'd upon this their new Seat in the year 1296. Dom. George de Norbury being then their Abbot; which Translation was ratified by the Bull of Pope Nicholas the IV. The Deed of the said Henry, whereby he gave this Church of Whally with all its Rights, Liberties and Appurtenants, bears date in the year 1283. In the thirty fourth year of Edward the III. Henry Duke of Lancaster, Earl of Derby, Lincoln, and Leicester, gave divers Lands to the Abbot and Convent of Whalley, for the maintaining of a Recluse, or Anchorite, and his Successors, dwelling in a place within the Church-yard of the Parish-Church of Whalley, and for two Women their Servants, who shall be there continually praying for the said Duke his Ancestors and Heirs, viz. to find them every Week throughout the year fifteen Loaves of the Convent Bread, each Loaf weighing fifty shillings sterling, and seven Loaves of the second sort, of the same weight; eight Gallons of the best Ale of the Convent, and three pence for their Companage; to deliver them yearly at the Feast of all Saints ten Stock-fish, and ten great Ling fish, one bushel of Oats for their Potage, one bushel of Salt, two Gallons of Oyl for their Lamps, one stone of Tallow for Candles, six Load of Turf, and one of Brushwood for Fuel, to keep their House in repair, and to find one of their Monks and a Clark to say Mass in the Chappel of the said Recluse, daily, etc.

The first Founder of this House, John de Lacy, Constable of Chester and Lord of Halton married Alice Sister of William de Mandeville, and died in the Holy Land. Of this Family was Henry de Lacy Founder of the Abby of Kirkstall (of whom before).

NUNAPLETON, in Yorkshire.

THIS Priory of Nuns was founded by Adeliza de Sacto- Quintino, and Robert her Son and Heir, dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. John the Apostle, and confirm'd by Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury. The several Donations made by the Founders and other Benefactors to this House were confirm'd by King John, in the sixth year of his Reign. Among the Injunctions prescribed to the Nuns of this House, Anno 1489. These were some. That the Cloister Doors be shut up in Winter at Seven, and in Summer at Eight a Clock at night and the Keys delivered to the Prioress. That the Prioress and all the Sisters lodge nightly in the Dorter, unless sick or diseased. That none of the Sisters use the Ale-house, nor the Water-side where course of Strangers daily resort. That none of the Sisters have their service of Meat and Drink to the Chamber, but keep the Frater and the Hall, unless sick. That no Sister bring in any Man, religious or secular, into their Chamber or any secret place day or night, etc. That the Prioress License no Sister to go Pilgrimage, or visit their Friends without great Cause, and then to have a Companion. That the Convent grant no Corodies or Liveries of Bread, or Ale, or other Victual, to any Person, without special License. That they take no Perhendinauncers or Sojourners unless Children, or old Persons, etc.

[Valued at 73 l. 9s. 10d. per Annum.]

108 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

CODENHAM Priory, in ... [Essex?]

COdenham was given to God, St. Mary, and St. John, by Eustachius de Merch, for Nuns of the Profession and Order of the Nuns of Apeltun.

BINEDON, in Dorsetshire.

FOunded Anno 1172. by Roger de Novo-Burgo and Matilda his Wife, endow'd with divers Lands by them and other Benefactors. All which was confirm'd to the Church of St. Mary of Bynedone and the Monks there, by King Henry the III. in the eighteenth year of his Reign. Henry de Novo Burgo granted power to the Abbot and Monks to choose whom they pleased for their Patron, who thereupon chose King Henry the III. and Alianor the Queen for their Patrons, which King accordingly took to him the Patronage, Advowson, and Protection of this Abby in the fifty sixth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 147 l. 7s. 9d. ob. q. per Annum.]

CROXDEN, in Staffordshire.

BErtram de Verdun built an Abby for Monks at Chotes, Anno Dom. 1176. Anno 1179. The Convent removed from thence to Crokesden.

Abbots of this House.

1. Thomas, ob. 1229.
2. William de Choucomb.
3. William de Esseburn, ob. 1257.
4. John de Tilton.
5. Walter de London, ob. 1268.
6. William de Howton, ob. 1278.
7. Henry de Moysam.
8. John de Billesdon, ob. 1293.
9. Richard de Twiford, ob. 1297.

A vacancy of above seven Months.

10. William de Evera. Richard de Essely restored 1320.
11. Richard de Esseby, displaced, 1313.
12. Thomas de Casterton.
13. Richard de Schepesheved 1335.

The Founder of this House Bertram de Verdun died in the Holy Land, and was buried at Acon, but most of his descendants were buried in the Church of this Abby. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 40.

[Valued at 90 l. 5s. 11d. per Annum.]

KELDEHOLM, in Yorkshire.

THE Abby at Keldeholm was founded for Nuns by William de Stutevill, and endow'd by the same William and several others of that Family. Confirm'd by King John in the second year of his Reign.

[Valued at 29 l. 6s. 1d. per Annum.]

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS. 109

PONT-ROBERT, or Roberts-Bridge, in Sussex.

FOunded for Monks by Robert de Sancto-Martino, in the Reign of King Henry the II. Anno Dom. 1176. Their Estate was confirm'd by King Henry the III. in the tenth year of his Reign. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 920.

[Valued at 248 l. 10s. 6d. per Annum.]

WICKHAM, in Yorkshire.

THIS Nunnery was founded by Paganus de Wicham, whose Son Theobald, Alan Buscell de Hoton, and the Prior of Bridlington, were Benefactors. King John confirm'd their Estate in the 2d. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 25 l. 17s. 6d. per Annum.]

ABERCONWAY, in Carmarthenshire. Founded Anno 1185.

THIS Abby of Monks was founded by Lewelin Son of Gervasius, Prince of North Wales, and by him endow'd not only with large Possessions in Lands, but with great Immunities and Priviledges, as to be quit from maintaining for their Founder any Men, Horses, Dogs, or Hawks, to have the Election of their Abbot free to themselves, to have and enjoy Wreck of the Sea in all their Lands, to be Tole free, etc. Whose Grant bears date Anno 1198. King Edward the I. in the twelfth year of his Reign, translated this Abby from Aberconway to a place called Maynan which he had built to the honour of God, St. Mary and all Saints, endowing it with Lands and Franchises.

[Valued at 162 l. 15s. per Annum.]

NUNCOTUN, in Lincolnshire.

INgeram de Muncels confirm'd the Gift of his Father Alan de Mancells of the Town of Cotun, and other Lands, to the Church of the blessed Mary of Cotun and the Nuns there. Pope Alexander granted them divers Priviledges, and Hugo Bishop of Lincoln settled the Conslitutions of their House, ordering among other things, that the number of the Nuns should not exceed thirty, that no Nun after Profession should have property in any thing, that no Nun should be or speak with any Person, whether secular or religious, alone, without witness, etc.

[Valued at 46 l. 17s. 7d. per Annum.]

DUNKEWELL, in Devonshire.

FOunded Anno 1201. By William Briwer. Their Lands were confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby, by King Hen. III. in the 11th. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 294 l. 18s. 6d. per Annum.]

110 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

BEAU-LEIU, in Hampshire.

KING John being offended with the Cistercian Order in England, and the Abbots of that Order coming to him to reconcile there selves, he caused them to be trod under his Horses Feet, for which Action being terrified in a Dream, he built and endowed the Abby of Beau-leiu in Newforest, for thirty Monks of that Order, Anno 1104. Vid. Vol. 2. p. 921.

[Valued at 326 l. 13s. 2d. ob. q. per Annum.]

MENDHAM, in Buckinghamshire.

THIS was a Cell to Woburne, founded by Hugh de Bolebec, and confirmed by King John in the second year of his Reign. The Convent of this Abby came hither from Woburne in the year 1204.

[Valued at 20 l. 6s. 2d. per Annum. ]

GRACE-DIEU, in Wales.

THIS Abby was founded by John of Monmouth Anno 1229. or according to others 1233. King Edw. 3. in the thirty fifth year of his Reign granted to this Abby the Hermitage of St. Briavello in the Forest of Dene for the finding and maintaining of a Chantery of two of their Monks, to celebrate there for the Souls of his Ancestors.

HAYLES, in Gloucestershire.

ANno 1246. Richard Earl of Cornwall and King of the Romans founded this Abby of Hayles for twenty Monks who came from Beau-lieu. Anno 1251. the Abby-Church was dedicated, the King, and Queen, and thirteen Bishops, being present at the Solemnity.

[Valued at 357 l. 7s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

NEWENHAM, in Devonshire.

FOunded Anno 1241. by Reginald de Moun, in his Mannor of Axeminster, with which and other Lands it was endowed. Confirmed by King Edw. 3. This Reginald de Mohun was the Son of Reginald Lord of Dunsterre, and Alice Daughter of William Bruer, by whom he inherited the Mannor of Axeminster. See in the Book at large the Progeny of the noble Family of Mohuns.

VOL. I. CISTERCIANS.

Abbots of this House.

John Godard.
John de Northampton.
Ralph de Shapewike.
Henry Spersholt.
William de Cornubia.
Robert de Puplfairie.
John de Ponte-Roberto.
Richard de Chichestre.
John de Cokyswill.
Jeffrey de Blanchvil.
Richard de Piderton.
John de Geytingtone, ob. 1338.
Hugh de Cokeswell.
William le Fria.
Walter de Hous.

[Valued at 227 l. 7s. 8d. per Annum.]

GRACE-DIEU, in Leicestershire.

FOunded by Roesia de Verdun, for Nuns. Endow'd by her with her Mannor of Beleton, etc.

LETLEY, in Hampshire.

KING Henry the III. was the Founder of this Abby of Letley, otherwise call'd Locum Sancti Edwardi, and endow'd it with Lands in the thirty fifth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 100 l. 12s. 8d. per Annum.]

REWLEY, in the Suburbs of Oxford.

THIS was founded in the year 1281. for Cistercian Monks, by Richard Earl of Cornwall, and King of the Romans, who endow'd this Abby with divers Lands. They were found by Inquisition to be exempt from suit to the County and Hundred Courts.

[Valued at 174 l. 3s. ob. per Annum.]

DERNHALL, in Cheshire.

KING Edward the I. founded and endow'd this Abby in performance of a Vow made in a great danger at Sea, his Deed of endowment bears date before he came to the Crown, in the four and fiftieth year of his Father's Reign. King Henry the III. granted his Letter of Request to all Religious Houses in England for the furnishing this House with Books. After King Edward came to the Crown in the seven and twentieth year of his Reign he translated these Monks to Vale-Royal, and granted them many great Immunities and Franchises.

Vid. 2. Vol. p. 911.

[The Abby of Vale-Royal was valued at 118 l. 7s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

112 CISTERCIANS. VOL. I.

BOCLAND, in Devonshire.

FOunded by Amicia Countess of Devon, for Cistercian Monks; endowed by her and her Daughter Isabella de Fortibus Countess of Albemarl and Devon, with many Lands and Liberties. Confirm'd by King Edward the II. Anno 4.

[Valued at 241 l. 17s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

HILTON, in Staffordshire.

ANno. 1223. Henry de Audiddeley founded and endow'd this Abby with many Lands and Liberties to hold in pure and perpetual Almes. King Richard the II. in the 19th year of his Reign, at the request of Elizabeth relict of Sir Nicholas de Audley, Licensed the Abbot and Convent of Blanchland in Normandy, to transfer to this House the Priory and Mannor of Cameryngham, which was thence forward united to this Abby.

[Valued at 75 l. 14s. per Annum.]

The Abby of Grace, near the Tower at London.

KING Edward the III. founded this House in the Church-yard of the Holy Trinity near the Tower at London, and endow'd it with all the Messuages and Gardens lying on and about the Tower Hill, Anno Reg. 24. (1350.) Afterwards in the fiftieth year of his Reign he gave the Mannor of Gravesend, and other Mannors in Kent to be settled upon this House. All which was after done and confirm'd by King Richard the II Anno Regn. 22.

[Valued at 546 l. 10s. per Annum.]

VOL. I. 113

Of the Carthusians.

This Order was first founded, Anno Dom. 1080. By a certain learned man named Bruno, who professing Philosophy at Paris and hearing the dead Body of his Friend, who had the Esteem of a very good Man when living, cry out as they were about to bury him, Justo dei judicio damnatus sum, he and six Companions forsook the World; and betook themselves to a most austere Life in a Desert and Melancholy Place call'd Cartusia, in the Diocess of Grenoble in France. Their inward Habit is of Hair-Cloath; they never eat flesh; on Fridays fast with Bread and Water; never stir out of their Monasteries, except the Prior and Procurator; observe almost continual silence; and suffer no Women to enter into any part of their Houses, no, nor their Churches. See more of their Rules in the Monasticon at large.

WITHAM, in Somersetshire.

KING Henry the II. founded this Monastery in the honour of the blessed Mary, St. John Baptist, and all Saints, for the Order of Carthusians, and endow'd it with divers Lands and Franchises. Imprecating on the Violator of that his pious Donation, the wrath of Almighty God, and his own Curse, unless the Party make Condign Satisfaction; but to all such as augment his Gift, or favour the Peace of the House, he wisht the Peace and Reward of the Eternal Father for ever.

HENTON, in Wiltshire.

ELa Countess of Salisbury, Widow of William Longespee Earl of Salisbury, founded this Monastery in her Park of Henton, for Carthusians, to the honour of God, the blessed Mary, St. John Baptist, and all Saints, and endow'd it with Lands and Liberties.

King Henry the III. in the four and twentieth year of his Reign granted and confirm'd to this House the same Liberties and free Customs which his Grandfather King Henry the II. had formerly granted to the Carthusians of Witham, with other Exemptions.

The Carthusians in the Suburbs of London.

KING Edward the III. in the forty fifth year of his Reign granted his License to Sir Walter Lord of Manny, to found this Monastery for

114 CARTHUSIANS. VOL. I.

Carthusian Monks in certain place without the Bars of West-Smithfield, call'd Newe-cherche-hawe, which House was to be called la Salutation mere dieu, and to endow the same with twenty Acres of Land there adjoyning.

Pope Urban, reciting that in the time of a great Pestilence Sir Walter Manny purchased this ground for a Church-yard to bury poor People in, and there intended to erect a Chappel and a Colledge of twelve Chaplains, by the License of Pope Clement the VI. but afterwards the said Sir Walter changing his intention, and erected here a Convent of Carthusians: the said Pope Urban granted his Bull of License for uniting to the said House of Carthusians, Ecclesiastical Benefices to the value of 200 l. per Annum.

BEAUVAL, or Bella-valle, in Nottinghamshire.

IN the year 1343. Nicholas de Cantilupo Lord of Ilkeston, by License of King Edward the III. founded this House in his Park of Gryseleye, in the County of Nottingham, for a Prior and twelve Carthusian Monks, to the glory of God, the blessed Virgin Mary, and all Saints, and endow'd it with Lands and Rents in Greseleye and Seleston.

This Nicholas de Cantilupo was lineally descended from Robert de Muskam, Seneschal or Steward to Gilbert de Gaunt that famous Souldier in the Army of William the Conqueror, from which Gilbert the said Robert de Muskam enjoy'd the Lordship of Ilkeston, conferr'd upon him in the Reign of King Henry the I.

Elizabeth Widow of Brian Stapleton Knt. and William Ryther Knt. and Sibilla his Wife, by License of King Richard the II. founded in this Church a Chantry, for the maintenance of two Chaplains, Monks of this House, to celebrate dayly for the Soul of William de Aldeburgh, etc.

St. ANNE, adjoyning to Coventry.

THIS was first founded in the year 1381. by William Lord de la Zowche, and first supplied with three Monks from the Carthusians at London, and with three others from Bellevalle. Besides the said Lord Sowche they had many other Benefactors, as Richard Luss, Mayor of Coventry, John Holmeton of Sleford, John Bokington Bishop of Lincoln, Thomas de Beauchamp Earl of Warwick, etc. who erected several Parts of their Buildings. In the year 1385. King Richard the II. became the principal Founder, with his own hands laying the first Stone in the Foundation of their Church, protesting publickly to be the Founder and to finish the Buildings. To this House were divers Churches appropriated and divers Lands given, among others the Mannor of Ediweston in the County of Rutland, by the Abbot and Convent of St. George de Bauquerville, in Normandy, with other Prior alians Lands, etc.

KINGSTON upon Hull, in Yorkshire.

Michael de la Pole Knt. Lord of Wingfeild, by his Deed dated at Kingston upon Hull 1378. Founded and endowed this House without the Walls of Hull for a Prior and twelve Carthusians, Monks, in lieu of Minnoress

VOL. I. CARTHUSIANS. 115

Nuns of the Order of St. Clare, as his Father in his life time had once intended. The House was founded to the honour of God, and the glorious Virgin Mary, and of St. Michael the Archangel, and all Angels, and holy Spirits, St. Thomas the Martyr, late Archbishop of Canterbury, and of all other Saints of God. And by assent of the Prior of the Great Carthusians in Savoy, the chief House of the Order, Walter de Kele was by the Founder made the first Prior of this House. Vid. 2. Vol p. 930.

MOUNT-GRACE, in Yorkshire.

THomas de Holland Duke of Surrey, Earl of Kent, and Lord Wake, founded this House for Carthusians in his Mannor of Bordelby, near Cleaveland in Yorkshire, to the honour of God, the Virgin Mary, and St. Nicholas, willing the House to be called the House of Mount-Grace of of Ingelby, and by assent of the Prior of the Grand Carthusians, made Robert Tredewy the first Prior of the same.

King Henry the VI. ratified and confirm'd this Foundation, in Parliament, in the ninteenth year of his Reign.

EPWORTH, in the Isle of Axholme, in Lincolnshire.

KING Richard the II. in the twentieth year of his Reign granted his License of Mortmain to Thomas Earl of Nottingham Marshal of England to found a Convent for Carthusian Monks on his Land at Epworth, in the Isle of Axholme, in Lincolnshire, and to name it the Visitation of the Mother of God, to the honour of God, the Virgin Mary, St. John the Evangelist and St. Edward the King and Confessor, and to endow the same with one hundred Acres of Land; Licensing also to the Abbot of St. Nicholas in Angiers, of the Order of St. Benedict, to grant over to this House their Priory of Monks Kirkeby, in Warwickshire, etc. to be appropriated to these Carthusians for ever, in pure and perpetual Alms.

Pope Boniface the IX. in the eighth year of his Pontificate granted Indulgence to such who should visit this Church of the Carthusians on the second of July being the Feasl of the Visitation of the blessed Mary, and contribute to the Buildings here.

This was a plenary Indulgence, and of the same manner with that which was formerly granted to the Church of the Angels without the Walls of Assisium in Italy, of which you may read in the Monasticon at large, p. 971, 972, etc.

SHEEN Monastery, in Surrey.

ANno Dom. 1414. King Henry the V. founded three Monasteries near his Royal Seat at Schene, one of Carthusians, one of Celestin Monks professing the Rule of St. Bennet, and one of Brigettines under the Rule of St. Augustin. The last was a Monastery of sixty Nuns, thirteen Priests, four Deacons, and eight Lay-Brothers; the Men and Women had two separate Convents, but one Church, in which the Nuns kept above in a kind of Gallery, and the men below.

116 CARTHUSIANS. VOL. I.

King Henry the V. by his Charter of Foundation dated in the third year of his Reign, appointed the House of Carthusians, which he founded at Shene, on the North-side of his Mannor there, to be call'd the House of Jesus of Bethleem at Shene; and to this House he gave the Lands of several Priors alians here in England, belonging to Abbies in France, granting in the said Charter that if any of the Lands so given should in time to come be evicted or recovered from the Prior and Monks of this House or their Successors, that then they should receive the like value yearly out of the Profits of the Hanaper in the Chancery, and out of the Customs arising in the Ports of London, St. Botulphs, Southampton, Lenn, and Cicester. He gave also several other Benefactions, as the Fishery at Shene, four Pipes of Gascon Wine yearly at the Purification of the blessed Mary for ever, with divers great Liberties and Exemptions from all manner of Taxes and Impositions, granting to the said Prior, and Monks, and their Successors Felons Goods, etc., and that they should have the return and execution of Writs in their Lands, with fines pro Licencia Concordandi, and all Amerciaments etc. Deodands, Treasure trove, etc. Clerk of the Mercate, Wreck of the Sea, etc. Free Warren in all their Demesnes and Lands already given or to be given, tho' within the Bounds of a Forest, Soc and Sac, Infangenthef, and Outfangenthef, and view of Frankpledge of all their Tenants and Residents, with a Pillory and Tumbrel, and that they may erect Gallows on their Lands for the execution of Malefactors, whom they should apprehend on their Lands according to the said Liberty of Infangenthef and Outfangenthef, and that they should have a Market weekly every Tuesday at their Town of Esthenreth in Berkshire, and two Fairs yearly, with other such like great Priviledges and Immunities.

VOL. I. 117

Additions, relating to the Benedictine Order.

WINCHESTER Cathedral Church. Supra p. 38.

SOme Remarks of the Founder and Royal Benefactors to the Church of Winchester, Kings and Saints buried there, out of Leyland. Pope Innocent confirmed to this Church all their Possessions with the grant of divers Priviledges, as not to pay any Tithes for their Lands or Cattle in their own proper hands, to celebrate Divine Offices in the time of a general Interdict, with a low Voice, etc. King Edgar restored Monks in this Church confirming their Possessions and Liberties with grievous Curses to the Violators. King Edward the Elder conferr'd on them certain Lands to hold free from any secular service except what related towards the building of Forts and Bridges.

SHAFTESBURY, in Dorsetshire. Supra 217.

KING John in the seventh year of his Reign confirm'd to the Church of St. Mary, and St. Edward at Shaftesbury, and to the Nuns there, their Lands and Liberties, among which was the whole hundred of the Mannor of Bradford, etc.

St. FRIDISWIDE, in Oxford. Supra 174.

THE Possessions of this House were enjoy'd by secular Canons for many years, till in the year 1122. (22. H. 1.) they were again restored to Regulars. Maud the Empress confirm'd to the Church of St. Fritheswithe and the Canons Regulars, divers Lands and Churches, and granted them a Fair. The like did King John in his first year.

St. WERBURG, at Chester. Supra 199.

Anno 1119. Richard Earl of Chester confirm^d the Possessions of this House given by many Benefactors, granting to the Abbot of this Monastery a Court of Pleas, and that the said Abbot should not be sued nor be forced to sue out of his own Court. Ralph de Meschines Earl of Chester, and his Son of the same name, were great benefactors to the Abbot and Convent of St. Werburg; so also were Richard de Rulios and Robert his Brother.

WHITBY, in Yorkshire. Supra 75.

William de Percy having built and endow'd in a Grove or Wood at Dunesle, a Hermitage in honour of St. James the Apostle, he

118 ADDITIONS. VOL. I.

gave it for ever into the Obedience and Subjection of the Church of St. Peter and St. Hylda of Whitby, so that they continually cellebrate the Divine Office there by some Priest of their House.

WULVERHAMTON, in Staffordshire.

IN this Town of Hampton, one Wulfruna, a religious Matron erected a Monastery to the honour of God, the ever blessed Virgin Mary (then term'd Stella maris & Domina gentium) and of all Saints, and endow'd the same with divers Lands, all which was ratified and establisht by Sigerich Archbishop of Canterbury in the year 996. by the Consent of King Ethelred. The Estate of this House was afterwards confirm'd by King Edward the Confessor, King William the Conqueror, King Henry the II. and King John, who gave Timber out of his Woods towards the buildings in this Abby.

GLOUCESTER, in Gloucestershire. Supra 108.

GLoucester became a Bishop's Seat in the year 189. soon after the Conversion of King Lucius. Eldadym in the year 489. and Dubricius in the year 522. were Bishops there. But the Seat was afterwards removed to Menevia, now call'd St. Davids. Wolpherus Son of Penda King of Mercia, according to Malmesbury, laid the first Foundations of the Monastery here, after whose death Ethelred his Brother and Successor carried on the Work, committing it to the care of Osric, who for this purpose he made his Prorex or Lieutenant of this Province. This House was first a Nunnery and continued such under three Abbesses successively. Afterwards Bernulphus King of Mercia, placed here secular Canons, who, though Clerks and Preachers, were married-men, and differ'd not much in their Habit from secular Christians; thus it continued till in the year 1022. King Canutus displaced the Canons, and in their room put Regular Monks of St. Benedicts Order. This Monastery being after wards burnt down, Aldredus Bishop of Worcester rebuilt it in the time of King Edward the Confessor, something distant from the place where it first stood, and more to the outside of the Town. It was twice destroy'd by fire since the Conquest, viz. in the years 1214. and 1223. in the Reigns of Henry the III. and Edward the I. The Buildings in and about this Church were increased and beautified by several Abbots of this Monastery, as Thomas Seabrook, Richard Hanlaces; and Parker, who was the last Abbot here, and built the South Porch of this Church.

TAVISTOCK, in ©Cbonlbwe Supra xio.

IN the time of King Edgar, Earl Ordulphus Son of Ordgarus begun this House in a place appointed by Revelation; finisht and confirm'd in the time of King Ethelred, Anno 981. Pope Celestine in the year 1193. granted to this Abby divers Priviledges and Exemptions. In the year 1304. The Prior of Plympton, of the Order of St. Augustin, did oblige himself and Successors to the Abbot of Tavestock and his Successors for the performance

VOL. I. ADDITIONS. 119

of divers Services and Offices in his Deed mentioned. King Henry the VIII. in the fifth year of his Reign granted to Richard Banham then Abbot of Tavistock and his Successors to be Lords of Parliament, and to enjoy all Honours and Priviledges of such; and moreover in case they should at any time be absent from Parliament on the Affairs of their House he pardon'd such their absence, they paying for every whole Parliament that they shall be absent five Marks.

NORWICH. Supra 413.

HErbert Bishop of Norwich translated the Monks hither from Thetford. This Bishop besides the Church at Norwich, caused to be built the Churches at Elmham, Lyn, and Yarmouth, and died Anno 1119.

STOKECLARE. Supra 535.

Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford gave to this House the Hermitage of Standune, that Divine Service might be there celebrated for him and his. The Donations and Endowments given to this House were confirm'd by Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury and by Pope Alexander, Anno Dom. 1174.

St. Mary de Pratis, at Northampton.

THIS was a Priory of Cluniac Nuns founded by Simon de St. Liz, Earl of Northampton, which Foundation, and all the Lands given there unto as well by the said Earl Simon as others, was all at large recited and confirm'd by the Charter of King Edward the III. in the second year of his Reign. Which may be seen from p. 1011. to p. 1019.

[Valued at 119 l. 9s. 7d. q. per Annum.l

PILLA Priory, in Wales.

ADam de Rupe founded here a Priory for Benedictine Monks of Tiron, which Priory he endow'd with divers Lands and Liberties. Dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Budoco.

HENINGHAM, in Essex.

FOunded and endow'd for Benedictine Nuns, by Abericus de Ver, Earl of Oxon, and dedicated to God, St. Mary, St. James, and the holy Cross. Hugh de Ver Earl of Oxford founded without the Gates of the Castle of Hegham, an Hospital for poor and impotent People; which that it might not be to the prejudice of ths Priory of the holy Cross at Hegham, nor to the Parish-Church there, was to be govern'd by certain Ordinances then made, among others, that the said Hospital should pay Tithes as well

120 ADDITIONS. VOL. I.

great as small to the Parish Church, and that the Chaplains of the said Hospital before they are admitted, should swear fealty to the Prioress of that Priory.

[Valued at 29l. 12s. 10d. per Annum.]

LAPLEY, in Staffordshire, a Cell to St. Remigius, at Rhemes.

Given by Algarus an Earl of England; the Appropriations belonging to this Priory were allow'd by Walter Bishop of Coventry and Litchfeild, Anno 1319. King Edward the I. in the twentieth year of his Reign, granted to the Abbot and Convent of St. Remigius at Rhemes, a Market in their Mannor of Aston in Staffordshire on the Tuesday, weekly, and a yearly Fair on the Eve and Day of St. Peter Ad vincula, with free Warren in their Demesnes of Lapley, Merston, and Aston.

TOTNES, in Devonshire.

JUbellus Son of Alured gave the Religious House here for a Cell to God and the holy Martyrs St. Sergius, and St. Bachus, and to the Abbot of that Monastery at Angiers in France. That they should pray for the good Estate of King William the Conqueror while living, and after his death for his Soul, and for him the said Jubellus and all his Relations.

BARNSTAPLE Priory of St. Mary Magdalen, in the Diocess of Exeter.

THIS was founded for a Prior and six Monks; given by the said Jubellus, and confirm'd by King William the Conqueror to the Cluniac Monks of the Abby of St. Martin de Campis at Paris. The Church of St. Peter at Barnstaple was apppropriated to this Priory by William Bishop of Exeter, by Deed dated, Anno 1233. The same William Bishop of Exeter did also by his Deed recite and confirm the Lands and Priviledges given to this Priory by Joel Son of Alured, before named.

The Priory of St. James without the Walls at Exeter, for a Prior aud four Monks. Supra 643.

THIS Priory, with divers Lands and Priviledges, were given by Baldewin de Riveriis Earl of Exeter, to the foresaid Cluniac Monks of 5t. Martins Abby at Paris.

The Priory of St. Clare, in Wales.

FOR a Prior and three Monks. This was given with nine Houses at London, by William Giffard Bishop of Winchester, to the foresaid Cluniac Monks of St. Martins Abby at Paris. Confirm'd by King Hen. the I.

VOL. I. ADDITIONS. 121

SWINE Abby, in Yorkshire. Supra p. 834.

Matilda Prioress of Swine and the Convent of Nuns there, did covenant with Sir Alexander Hilton, Knight, who had given them nine Bovates of Land in Swine, that in case the said Sir Alexander should die in the year 1241. or in the second year after, that then three Bovates of the nine should return back to the Heirs of the said Sir Alexander; in case he die in the third year, then six of the said Bovates should return to the Heirs of the said Knight, but in case the said Sir Alexander should keep the said Nuns indempnified for the said three years, then the Nuns to give back the said Land with the Deed of Feoffment after the expiration of the term of six years, etc.

BYLAND, in Yorkshire. Sup. 775.

THE History of the Foundation of this Abby was writ at large by Phillip the third Abbot of this House; and is in short as follows. In the Reign of King Henry the I. Anno Dom. 1134. After the Foundation of the Abby of Furnes, whose Monks came from Savigny in France, an Abbot and Convent of twelve Monks went from the Abby of Furnes, to Cald in Copland, then newly erected, the Abbots name was Geraldus; here they remained for about four years, till in the year 1137. being plunder'd and their House almost wholly destroy'd, they were forced to return back to Furnes, but being refused entrance there, and distrest for want of a Habitation, they were partly through the recommendation of Thurstan Archbishop of York, and partly out of pitty to their Condition, relieved by Gundrea relict of Nigellus de Albeney, and Roger de Molbray her Son; which Roger settled them for a time at a place call'd Hode, a Hermitage belonging to one Robert de Alneto a Hermit; who upon their arrival resign'd the place to them, and became a Monk among them, this was in the year 1158. The said Roger gave these Monks for their maintenance the Tithe of all the Provision spent in his House, for the collecting of which they had a Lay-brother (Conversus) always remaining in his House, who collected the said Tithe, and sent it to the Monastery, but this being found, in time, inconvenient, was not long after chang'd into an Endowment of Land, Anno 1140. After this Abbot, Geraldus seeing the Estate of his Monastery encrease, and fearing that the Abbot of Furnes would claim it, by reason that he and his Convent came from thence at first, and had therefore a kind of filial Relation, tho' they were since refused assistance from thence, when in distress, hereupon he made a Journey to Savigny, the Mother House of Furnes, and obtain'd from the Abbot there in a general Chapter of the whole Order (Anno 1142.) to be discharged of all subjection to Furnes, and to be immediately subject to Savigny. This Abbot Geraldus dying in his return home, Roger then Master of the Novices, was unanimously chosen Abbot, and so confirm'd by the Archbishop of York, at the Presentation of Roger Molbray their Patron. After this the Abbot of Furnes placed another Abbot and Convent at Cald. Anno 1149. Roger de Molbray gave to these Monks the Town and Church of Bellalanda, or Biland, with the Appurtenants, whether they afterward removed their Habitation. When Abbot Roger perceived the Inhabitants of Scalton (a Vill belonging to Biland) to suffer divers Inconveniencies in coming to the Mother

122 ADDITIONS. VOL. I.

Church of Biland as well for Divine Service, as Sacraments, he obtain'd of Henry Murdac then Archbishop of York, License to build a Chappel at Scalton for the ease of the Inhabitants there, Anno 1146. reserving the burial of the dead to the Mother Church at Biland. The License thus obtain'd, the said Abbot Roger and his Monks soon built a Church at Scalton, and furnisht it with Books, Vestments, Font, and other neccesaries, and caused one of the Bells of the Mother Church to be removed thither. This being finisht, the said Roger presented a Clerk to the Archbishop, who was accordingly instituted to the Cure of the said Chappel. After this, this Abby of Biland had many Donations, the said Roger de Molbray giving so much, that the Abbot did at last refuse to accept any more, saying he had sufficient. Anno 1147. It was decreed in the Council of Rhemes held under Pope Engenius the III. that the Church of Savigny with thirteen Abbies, Daughters of that Church, shiould be all subjected to the Church of Clarevallis, of the Cistercian Order. Anno 1150. The Abbot of Cald, and the Abbot of Furnes seeing the Riches and Prosperity of this House of Biland, began to set a Foot a Title and Pretence to a Jurisdiction over this House, by reason of Paternity (or Maternity) against the Abbot of Savigny; which was so far prosecuted by the Abbot of Furnes, that at last the general Chapter of Cistercians did delegate the Cause to be heard and adjudged by the Abbot of Ryevalle, who determin'd it for the Abbot of Savigny. The foresaid Roger Abbot of Biland, lived Abbot of the same fifty four years, and then by reason of his decrepid age, resign'd, surviving near three years after. To him succeeded in this Office Abbot Phillip, who writ this History, as he had heard it related from his said Predecessor Roger and others, Anno 1197.

THE Alien Priories, supprest in the second year of Henry the V. Anno Dom. 1414. were in number one hundred and forty two, whose names see in the Book at large.

The Religious Houses supprest by Pope Clement the VII. and granted to Cardinal Wolsey by King Henry the VIII. in the seventeenth year of his Reign for the building of two Colledges, at Oxford and Ipswich, were in number one and twenty; and afterwards six more by another Bull of the same Pope, which were granted also to the said Cardinal for the same purpose, by King Henry the VIII. in the twentieth year of his Reign.

An exact Catalogue of the Religious Houses was made in the twenty sixth year of King Henry the VIII. with the Annual Values of almost all of them, as well in Wales as England. Which Catalogue was afterwards incerted into the Books of First Fruits and Tenths.

Out of which Catalogue I have set down the Valuation of the Annual Rents of each House, under the proper Head, in the foregoing Epitome, except some few not then valued.

Having said something in the beginning, of the Institution of the Monastical Life, I shall here add what Opinion Men had of the Subversion of Monasteries, even among Protestants.

VOL. I. 123

The Augustine Confession, says, That Monasteries were heretofore Schools of sacred Learning, advantagious to the Church, and that Pastors and Bishops came from thence. Calvin in his Institutions, says, Monastick Colledges were then as Seminaries of the Ecclesiastick Order; and gives a very great Encomium of their manner of Life and Piety, Charity to the Poor, and Humanity, out of St. Augustines Epistles.

Hyperius says, That Monasteries at their Institution were no other than Convents of Good men, and Students; Schools where the Elder did teach the younger Religion, where they did spend their time in writing, and disputing, and instituting those who afterwards arrived to eminent places in the Church, as to be Bishops or Priests, etc. William Perkins, says. That the Monasteries of the Ancients were for the most part Publick Schools, that is, Communities of Teachers and Learners.

The Preamble of the Stat. 27 H. 8. (omitted in the printed Act), for the Suppression of certain Religious Houses, (viz. under the value of 200 l. per Annum) hath these Words, Forasmuch as manifest sin is dayly used, and commonly committed in such little and small Abbies and Priories, etc. where the Congregation of such religious Persons is under the number of twelve persons, etc. Considering also that divers and great solemn Monasteries of this Realm, wherein, thanks be to God, Religion is well kept and ohserved, he destitute of such full numbers of religious Persons as they might and may keep, etc. Therefore the said lesser Monasteries were dissolved, and their Lands given to the King.

Sir Edward Coke, in his 4th. Institut. p. 44. says, In the Reign of Henry the VIII. the Members of both Houses of Parliament were informed, on the King's behalf, That no King or Kingdom was safe but where the King had ability to live of his own, and to defend his Kingdom upon any sudden Invasion or Insurrection, etc. It was therefore projected, that if the Parliament would give unto him all the Abbies, Priories, Nunneries, etc. that forever in time then to come, he would take order that the same should not be converted to private use, but first that his Exchequer for the Purposes aforesaid should be enriched. 2dly. The Kingdom strengthened by a continual maintenance of forty thousand well trained Souldiers with skillful Captains and Commanders. 3dly. for the Benefit and Ease of the Subject, who should never afterwards in any time to come, be charged with Subsidies, Fifteenths, Loans, or other common Aides. 4thly, Least the honour of the Realm should receive any diminution (there being nine and twenty Lords of Parliament among the Abbots and Priors, who held of the King per Baroniam) the King would create a number of Nobles. The said Monasteries and their Possessions were given to the King, his Heirs and Successors. Now observe the Catastrophe not long after the dissolution of the Monasteries, the said King demanded and had two Subsidies, and exacted divers Loans.

There were in the Reign of Henry the VIII. Monasteries and Religious Houses, forty of which being granted to Cardinal Wolsey for the Endowment of his two Colledges: Soon after, as the Pope had given these to the Cardinal, the King with the Parliaments assent took the rest. Anno 1536. those under 200 l. per Annum, were granted, amounting to 376, and soon after the Remainder, being in all 605 Monasteries. Besides them, were given 96 Colledges, 110 Hospitals, and 2374 Chantries and free Chappells. The Revenue of all which, is wisht to have been bestow'd for the Advancement of the Church, Relief of the Poor, etc., rather than

124 VOL. I.

conferr'd with such a prodigal Dispenfation on those who stood ready to devour what was sanctified. To this purpose one Henry Brinklow a Merchant of London, made a Complaint to the Parliament of the Abuse that follow'd in relation to Appropriations, which as he said were the best Benifices, and did amount to the third part of all the Parish Churches in England. Touching the Alms {says he) that they dealt, and the Hospitality that they kept, every man knoweth that many thousands were well received of them, and might have been better, if they had not so many Great mens Horses to feed, and had not been overcharged with such idle Gentlemen as were never out of the Abbies. But now that all the Abbies with their Lands and Impropriated Parsonages are in Temporal mens hands, where 20 l. was given formerly to the poor yearly, in more than one hundred places in England, is not one meals meat given; where they had always one or other Vicar that either preached or hired some to preach, now there is no Vicar at all, but the Farmer is Vicar and Parson too.

The Lord Herbert in his History of Hen. VIII. says, That the King was petition'd that some of the Houses, both the the Vertue of the Persons in them, and for the Benefit of the Country, (the Poor receiving thence great Relief, and the richer sort good Education for their Children) might be left for pious Uses; Bishop Latimer also moved that two or three might for those ends be left in every Shire. But Cromwell (by the King's permission) invaded all. However the King thought fit to have this Proceeding confirm'd by Act of Parliament. But the Christian World (says my Lord Herbert) was astonisht at these doings. Besides the Houses and Lands taken away, there was much mony made of the present Stock of Cattle and Corn, of the Timber, Lead, Bells, etc., and chiefly of the Plate and Church Ornaments, which is not valued, but may be conjectured by that one Monastery of St. Edmunds Bury, whence was taken five thousand Marks of Gold and Silver, besides divers Stones of great Value.

The End of the First Volume.

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM, ABRIDGED.

VOL II.

OF THE Canons Regular Of St. AUGUSTIN,

HOSPITALERS, TEMPLARS, GILBERTINES, PRAEMONSTRATENSES, and MATURINS, or TRINITARIANS.

Vol. II. 127

OF THE ORIGINAL OF CANONS

OF the Author of this Institution there is great variety of Opinion. Some ascribe it to the Apostles, others to Pope Urban the I. about the year of Christ 230. Others to St Augustin; Others to Pope Gelasius the I. about the year 495. etc. Canons were first introduced in England by one Berinus, Anno Christi 636. The Canonical Life being by little and little relaxt and fallen off, Canonical Clerks were in the Council of Mentz, Anno 813. reduced back to their first manner of living, viz. to live in Common, to have but one Table, one Purse, and one Dormitory. About Anno 1083. it was enjoyn'd that no Canon should dare to become an Abbot or Monk under the penalty of Excommunication. In process of time Canons becoming loose and disorderly, another sort of Canons began to be taken notice of, who observing a stricter Discipline, were call'd Canons Regular, and the others Canons Secular. The Canons Habit is a white Tunick with a Linnen Gown, under a black Cloak. St. James the Apostle and the first Bishop of Jerusalem, is said first to have assumed the Linnen Tunick, after the manner of the ancient Levitical Priests.

This Order had formerly in Europe four thousand five hundred and fifty five Monasteries, In Italy seven hundred. Popes of this Order there have been thirty six, Cardinals three hundred, Holy men and such who have been reckon'd in the Catologue of Saints seven thousand five hundred.

128 VOL. II.

For the Canons of this Order were made three Rules.

The first Rule which St. August in made for his Brethren, who promised to live together in Common, consists of nine Chapters; and treats of the Community of Goods, Self-denial, etc.

The second Rule of St. Augustin appoints the manner and time of Praying, Singing, Reading, Working, Living, and Conversing, and consists of Five Chapters.

The third Rule of St. Augustin, treats more largely of those things which appertain to the Community of living among Clerks, and consists of Forty Five Chapters.

VOL. II. 129

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM,

Vol. II.

Of the Order Of St. Augustin.

DOVER, in Kent.

JUlius Caesar having Conquer'd Britain (now call'd England) forty seven years before the Birth of Christ, built a Tower at Dover where the Castle now stands. In the year of Grace 180, King Lucius then reigning in Britain, became a Christian under Pope Elutherius, and among other Pious Deeds built a Church in the Castle of Dover. Anno 469, King Arthur repair'd the said Castle, and built the Hall there call'd Arthur's-hall. After this the Saxons came out of Germany, Conquer'd Britany, beat the Britons into Wales, who afterwards were call'd Welchmen, and the Saxons Englishmen, and being Pagans, demolisht Churches, and supprest Christianity throughout the Land. Anno 586. Pope Gregory sent St. Augustin the Monk with others into England, who converted to Christ the King then reigning in Kent, named Adelbert, whose Son and Successor Adelbold placed twenty four Secular Canons in the said Castle to serve in his Chappel there. Anno 686. Withred King of Kent built the Church of St. Martin, in the Town of Dover, and removed the said Canons thither, from the Castle; here they remain'd 400 years after. He built also three other Churches for the use of the Parishioners, which were however Chappels subordinate to St. Martins. But these Canons being very licentious by reason of their great Priviledges and Exemptions from the ordinary Jurisdiction. King Henry the I. in 1130. did give the said Church of St. Martin to the Archbishop of Canterbury and his Successors, and tho' William Corboil then Archbishop, built the New Minster, and design'd to have made it an Abby of Canons of St. Augustin, yet after his death Theobald Archbishop of Canterbury, in the Reign of Henrythe II. put Monks of St. Bennet therein. The said King Henry the II. by his Charter subjecting the Government of this House to the Archbishop of Canterbury intirely, and that no other Order but that of St. Bennet should be herein. King Edward the III. in the thirtieth year of his Reign did unite and annex this House to the Priory of christ Church in Canterbury for ever, so that none for the future should be Prior here, but a Monk of Canterbury.

[Valued at the Suppression at 170 l. 14s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

130 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

BODMYN, in Cornwall.

KING Henry the III in the seven and fiftieth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Prior and Canons of Bodmine, the Mannor of Newton, in the County of Devon, formerly given them by King Eadred, with Exemption from suit to the County of Devon and Hundred of Shesbury, etc.

[Valued at 270 l. 0s. 11d. per Annum.]

St. GERMAINS, in Cornwall.

It was found by Inquisition in the thirtieth of Edw. the III. That King Canute endow'd this Church, and that here was then a Bishops Seat for Cornwall, which was after united to Cryditon, and in the Reign of Edward the Confessor, removed from thence to Exeter; and that soon after, Leofricus then Bishop of Exeter did remove from hence the Secular Canons, and did found here a Priory of Canons Regular, and that hereupon the Bishops of Exeter for the time being became Patrons of this Priory, and enjoy'd the Profits of the Vacations of the said Priory when they happened.

[Valued at 243 l. 8s. per Annum.]

PLIMTON, in Devonshire.

HERE was formerly a Colledge consisting of a Dean and four Prebendaries founded by some of the Saxon Kings, which Canons or Prebendaries were displaced by Wil. Warwist Bishop of Exeter, because they would not leave their Concubines and a Priory of Canons Regular erected here, which Priory was founded in the Mansion house of the Rectory of the said Church of Plimpton, and the said Foundation confirm'd by King Hen. the I. who also granted and confirm'd to the Canons there, divers Lands, Liberties, and Immunities. Among other Benefactors to this Priory, King Edgar gave them divers Lands for the Maintenance of two Canons, ad divina ibidem celebranda, & pro peregrinis & aliis hospitandis. Afterwards King Edward the I. granted to the said Canons, that for the future they might appoint and place in the Church of Landoho, where the said Revenue did arise, a Secular Vicar and Chaplain to celebrate there, and to perform the said Alms and Hospitality, nomine dictorum Prioris & Canonicorum.

[Valued at 912 l. 12s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

WALTHAM, in Essex.

THIS Monastery was built to the praise of our Lord Jesus Christ, and of the holy Cross, by Earl Harold (afterwards King) who endow'd the same with divers Lands and Goods. All which were confirm'd, with the Grant of great Liberties, by King Edward the Confessor, Anno Dom. 1062. Which Harold being slain in Battle, by William the Conqueror,

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 131

was buried in this Abby-Church. Anno Dom. 1177. The Secular Canons here were removed and Canons Regular placed in their room, by King Henry the II. who confirm'd their Estate and Liberties, and ordain'd that in the said Abby, no Kinsman of the Abbot should be made Steward or other Officer, nor any Officer to hold his place by Inheritance, but removable at the Will of the Abbot and Canons. The like Confirmation was made by King Richard.

[Valued at 900 l. 4s. 3d.. per Annum.]

PENTNEY, in Norfolk.

FOunded to the honour of God, the glorious Virgin Mary, and the blessed Mary Magdalen, by Robert de Vauz and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Churches. This Robert came into England with the Conqueror, from whom descended by an Heir General the Lords Roos who became thereupon Patrons of this Priory.

[Valued at 170 l. 4s. 9d. per Annum.]

WALSINGHAM, in Norfolk.

GAlfridus de Favarches endowed a Chappel here, which his Mother had founded in honour of the perpetual Virgin Mary, with divers Revenues; confirm'd by Robert Brucut, and Roger, Earl of Clare. The Chappel here was first begun in the Reign of Edward the Confessor, but the Canons introduced in the time of William the Conqueror. Here was a perpetual Chantry establisht for the Souls of Thomas de Felton, etc., in the Chappel of St. Ann in the Priory, consisting of four Chaplains. 8. R. 2.

[Valued at 391 l. 11s. 7d. per Annum.]

THREMHALE, in Essex.

GIlbert de Montefixo, or Munfichet, who was a Roman by birth, and Kinsman to the Conqueror, came into England in his Army, and having attained large Possessions here, gave Land in Thremhale for the building a Religious House with some small Possessions; and returning to Italy, the place of his Nativity, left issue Richard de Munfichet who gave to God and the Church of St. James the Apostle at Thremhale, divers Lands and Priviledges; from this Richard are descended by an Heir General the Veres Earls of Oxford, who became Benefactors to this House.

[Valued at 60 l. 18s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

The Priory of Huntington.

EUstachius the Viscount, who also held the Barony of Lovetot, founded the Priory of St. Mary of Huntingdon, and endow'd it with divers Lands, confirm'd by King Henry the I. In the Town of Huntingdon were in former time fifteen Parish-Churches, tho' at present there remains but

132 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

four. David Bruce Earl of Huntingdon was buried in this Priory. Pope Eugenius confirm'd to the Canons here all their Lands and Priviledges, Anno Dom. 1147. and so did King Henry the III. in the seven and thirtieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 187 l. 13s. 8d. per Annum.]

St. OSWALDS, near Gloucester.

FOunded by Ethelred Earl of Marches and Ethelfleda his Wife before the Conquest, for Prebendaries, who translated hither the Body of St. Oswald from Bardney. But soon after the Conquest, this Colledge being impropriated to the See of York, that Archbishop changed the Prebendaries here to Canons Regular.

[Valued at 90 l. 10s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

BARNEWELL, near Cambridge.

IN the time of William the Conqueror lived one Picot, a Norman, a Person of great Note, who was Viscount or Sheriff in this County, he had also a Barony here. Hugolin his Wife being much devoted to St. Giles, made a Vow in her sickness to erect a Monastery to that Saint, which Vow her Husband confirm'd; this was erected near the Castle in Cambridge, and six Canons Regular placed therein under the Rule of one Galfridus de Huntedon. But Picot and his Wife dying before their intended Charity was fully compleated, and Robert their Son being after their death accused of Treasonable Practices for which he fled the Kingdom, King Henry the I. seized upon his Barony, and gave it to a Paganus Peverelle, who finding this House fallen to decay, undertook to restore it, and increase the Canons to the number of thirty. To this end he obtained of the King a peice of Ground lying without the Town of Cambridge, call'd Barnewell, of sweet and delicate Situation: here he built a very fair Church, and removed the said Canons hither with great Solemnity from the place of their first Foundation in Cambridge, Anno Dom. 1112. after they had continued there just twenty years. From this Paganus Peverell the Patronage of this Priory descended by an Heir General to the Peches. Anno Dom. 1284. Gilbert Peche gave the Patronage of this Monastery to King Edward for ever. The abovesaid Paganus Peverell was Standard-bearer to Robert Son of William the Conqueror in the holy Land. The Particulars of their Revenue was found by Inquisition 3. E. 1. which see in the Book at large. The foresaid Gillert Peche, by his Deed dated 1256. granted to the Canons of this House liberty to choose their own Prior, but that upon the death of the Prior, one or two of the Canons should come to him, if in England, and acquaint him therewith, and desire his leave (as Patron) to proceed to a new Election, that thereupon they should proceed, and, having made their Election, they should present the Person elected to him, and require his consent, that during the time of Vacation, he, his Heirs, or Successors, should not commit any Wast on the Goods of the said Monastery, nor have there more than one Servant with a Horse and a Boy.

[Valued at 256 l. 11s. 10d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 133

NOSTELL, in Yorkshire.

Robert de Laci founded the Church of St. Oswald at Nostell, and endow'd the same with divers Lands and Revenues, for Canons Regular, granting them free liberty to Elect their own Prior. King Henry the I. recited and confirm'd the several Grants of their Benefactors; the like did King Henry the II. to this Priory, by the name of the Church of the blessed Oswald the King and Martyr adjoyning to the Castle of Pontefract, in a place called Nastle. In the year 1231. the Prior and Convent here leased their Estate at Canonthorp to William de Runeys, Knt. for his Life, at the Rent of 13s. 4d. per Annum, the said William causing Divine Service to be celebrated at the Chappel there three days in every Week, viz. Sunday, Wednesday and Friday, with other Covenants.

[Valued at 492 l. 18s. 2d. per Annum.]

BREDON, in Leicestershire.

RObert Earl of Notthgham gave to the Church and Canons of St. Oswald of Nostle, the Church of St. Mary, and St. Hardulf of Bredon with divers Lands and Revenues to the same appertaining. Whereupon this House became a Cell to that of Nostell immediately before treated of; yet by subsequent agreement between the Prior and Convent of Nostell, and Walter, Advocate, or Patron of Bredon, the said Prior should upon a Vacancy at Bredon, choose two of the Canons there, or in case there should not be two fit Persons there then two of his own House, of which two the said Walter should choose one, and then the said Prior and Walter joyntly to present the party so chosen to the Diocesan, to be Prior of Bredon. Vid Vol. 3. p. 41.

[Valued at 24 l. 10s. 4d. per Annum.]

ANother Cell to Nostell was Woodkirk (or Wodechurche) in Yorkshire, endow'd for Canons by the Earls of Warren.

HYRST, in the Isle of Axholme, in Lincolnshire.

THIS was a Cell belonging to Nostell, endow'd with Lands by Nigellus de Albani, and Roger de Moubray.

[Valued at 5 l. 10s. 1d. per Annum.]

SCOKIRK, in Yorkshire.

Was another Cell to the foresaid Priory of Nostell. To which Gaufridus Fitz-Pagan and others gave Lands and Tithes. William de Archis granted to the Canons here half the Tithe of his Bread made in his House for ever in pure and perpetual Alms.

[Valued at 8 l. per Annum.]

134 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

COLCHESTER, in Essex.

KING Henry the I. gave to the Church of St. Julian, and St. Botolph of Colchester, and to the Canons there the Tithes of all his Demesnes in Hetfeld, with divers Lands in and about Colchester; confirming to them other Lands which they had of the Gift of Hugh Fitz-Stephen to hold in Serjeancy by the finding of one Horse of the price of five shillings, and one Sack and one Prick, at the King's charges when he makes War against the Welch for forty days. Pope Paschall the II. by his Bull dated A.D. 1116. granted to the Canons of this House, that as they were the first of this Order in England, so they should be the first in Dignity, and exempted them from all Secular or Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction other than that only of the See of Rome, and finally that they should choose their Own Superior; but present him when chosen to the Bishop of London to be Consecrated.

[Valued at 523 l. 17s. per Annum.]

HAGHMON, in Shropshire.

THIS was founded in the year 1100. (1. H. 1.) by William Fitz Allen. King Edward in the thirteenth year of his Reign confirmed to the Church of St. John the Evangelist of Haghmon, and to the Canons there, all their Lands and Revenues given by several Benefactors, among whom were some of the Welch Princes. Vide infra 933.

[Valued at 259 l. 13s. 7d. per Anmm.]

St. JAMES at Northampton.

FOunded and endowed by William Peverell. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. With the grant of divers Liberties.

[Valued at 175 l. 8s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

WIRKSOP, in Nottinghamshire.

FOunded and endowed by William de Lovetot, 3. Hen. 1. and dedicated to God and St. Cuthbert: Which Estate was confirm'd and encreased by his Heirs. Pope Alexander the III. by his Bull dated Anno Dom. 1161. confirm'd the Estate of the Canons here, and granted them divers Priviledges, as to pay no Tithes for the Cattle and Lands in their own occupation; to present Priests from among their own Brethren to the Bishop to be instituted to the Parish Churches which they hold, who shall be answerable to the Bishop for the Cure of the People, and to the Priory for the Profit of the Livings; to have a Caemitary free for the burial of such as desire to be buried with them, saving the Rights and Dues of the Parish-Churches from whence the dead are brought; and to celebrate the Divine Offices, privately, in the time of a general Interdict. Their Lands and Liberties were also confirm'd by King Hen. II. Vid. infra 937.

[Valued at 239 l. 10s. 5d. per Annum.l

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 135

FELLEY, in Nottinghamshire.

THIS was a Cell belonging to Wyrksop (alias Radeford) given to that House by Radulphus de Annesley and Reinold his Son, Anno Dom. 1152. (2. H. 2.) In the year 1343. William Archbishop of York appropriated the Church of Adingburgh to this Priory of Felley for the encrease of four Canons more, there being but five before, so that for the future there should be nine, of which one to be Prior, reserving out of the Fruits and Profits of the said Church a sufficient subsistance for a perpetual Vicar, which Vicar was to be presented by the Prior and Canons of this Monastery.

[Valued at 40 l. 19s. 1d. per Annum.]

LANTHONY, in Wales (after Translated to Gloucester).

HERE was of old time a small Chappel of St. David, in a very solitary place, where a Knight called William, belonging to the Family of Hugh de Lacy, forsaking the World led an Heremitical Life; whose eminent Fame for Holiness drew to him one Ernisius Chaplain to Queen Maud, Wife of King Henry the I. who became his associate in his Devotions and Austerity; this was Anno Dom. 1103. under the Reign of King Henry the I. In the year 1108. they erected here a mean Church which was dedicated to St. John Baptist, by the Bishop of that Diocess [Llandaff], and the Bishop of Hereford. Of these two Heremits Hugh de Lacy became a Protector and Benefactor. After some time, these two, through the Advice and Approbation of Anselme Archbishop of Canterbury were willing to encrease their number and to alter their poor House from a Heremits Cell to be a Monastery, and they chose from all the Religious Orders then in being, that of the Canons Regular. A certain number of Canons were thereupon assembled from the Monasteries of Mereton, the holy Trinity at London, and Colchester, and establisht here at Lanthony, over whom the foresaid Ernisius was made Prior; the number of Canons being about that time forty, or more. And many their Benefactors besides Hugh de Lacy who conferr'd on them more Revenues than they were willing to receive. Walter the Constable, being the chief Officer in the King's Court, and one of the Greatest Men of the Kingdom, took on him a Religious Habit, and spent the remainder of his days in this House. On the death of Ernisius, Robert de Retun was chosen Prior, but he being afterwards made Bishop of Hereford, Robert de Braci was chosen to succeed him. After the death of Henry the I. the Canons of this House were much afflicted and disturb'd in their Possessions here, whereupon Milo Earl of Hereford, the Kings Constable (and Son of that Walter who became a Religious man among the Canons) gave them a piece of Ground without the Walls of Gloucester for a new Seat, here they built a new Church, which in the year 1136. was solemnly dedicated by the Bishops of Worcester and Hereford in honour of the blessed Mary, yet still this House retain'd the name of Lanthony. After this Robert de Braci died and was buried in the new Monastery at Gloucester, to whom succeeded William de Wycumb. And now it was, that by Papal Authority the Church of St. Mary at Gloucester was confirm'd as

136 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

a Cell to that of St. John Baptist at Lanthony. However the Canons being better pleased with their new Habitation, which was much braver and richer than their old Seat in Wales, chose to inhabit at Gloucester, removing and spoiling what they had at Lanthony. They became also very licentious in their way of living. During this William their Prior falling into Troubles and Vexation as well with the Canons of his own House, as Roger Earl of Hereford the Patron, was forced to resign his Office; to whom succeeded Clement the Sub-prior. This man reform'd the Abuses that were in the Monastery, especially as to the Church Service. From the aforenamed Milo Earl of Hereford, descended by an Heir General the Noble family of Bohuns Earl of Northampton, Hereford, and Essex, who by reason thereof were Patrons of this Monastery. The first Founder, Hugh de Lacy, came into England with the Conqueror, but died without issue, and his Inheritance went to his two Sisters, from whom are descended divers Noble Families, of which Descents see the Book at large. King John in the first year of his Reign recited and confirm'd to the Canons of Lanthony the several Lands and Revenues given them by their Benefactors. The like did King Edward the II. in his eighteenth year. King Edward the IV, in the one and twentieth year of his Reign gave the Priory of Lanthony and all the Lands, etc., belonging to the same, to Henry Deen, then Prior of the Priory of the blessed Mary of Lanthony at Gloucester, and to the Canons there to be consolidated and united thereunto for ever, providing that the Prior and Canons at Gloucester shall for the future maintain at Lanthony one Prior dative and removeable at will, with four Canons to celebrate Masses and other Divine Offices there for ever, if not hindred by Rebels and Wars.

[Valued at 648 l. 19s. 11d. per Annum.]

CARLILE, in Cumberland.

KING Henry the I. gave the Churches of New-Castle upon Tyne, and Newbourne, to the Canons of St. Mary of Carlile. Besides that King, the King of Scotland and many others were Benefactors, all whose Gifts were confirm'd by King Henry the II. And others given by King Edward the I. and II.

[Valued at 418 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.]

DUNMOW, in Essex.

THE Church here was built in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary by Juga Baynard Lady of little Dunmow, whose Son and Heir Golfridus Baynard by the assent of Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury placed Canons herein, Anno Dom. 1106. The Estate here and that at Caste Baynard, in London, being forfeited by William Baynard (Anno 1111.) was given by King Henry to Robert Grandson of Gilbert Earl of Clare, whose issue became Patrons of this House, till in the year 1216. Robert Fitz Walter refusing to consent to King John's unlawful love to his Daughter Matilda the Fair, that King seized upon his Estate and Barony, and his Castle of Baynard at London; and Matilda, who was then here at Dunmow, not admitting

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 137

the Kings Suit, was poison'd in a mess of Broth. These things occasioned the Barons Wars, which after a while were again composed, and Robert Fitz Walter restored to his Barony and the Kings Favour as formerly, Anno 1268. John Prior of this Church was suspended, and the Conventual Church interdicted, because his tenth was unpaid the space of four days, but Appeal being made, the Suspension was denied, and disowned.

Priors of DUNMOW.

Briticus, ob. 1120.
Augustinius, ob. 1163.
Robertus, ob. 1179.
Radulphus, ob. 1208.
Durandus, ob. 1219.
Willielmus, ob. 1221.
Thomas, ob. 1238.
Johannes Pateford, ob. 1245.
Hugo de Steveinheth, ob. 1246.
Edmundus, ob. 1247.
Galfridus, ob. 1248.
Johannes de Codham, ob. 1270.
Hugo de Posslington Ceffit, 1279.
Richardus de Wicham.
Stephanus de Noble, ob. 1312.
Robertus.

10 August 1502. The Bells in the Steeple at Dunmow were consecrated; the first in honour of St. Michael; the second in honour of St. John Evangelist the third in honour of St. John Baptist; the fourth in honour of the Assumption of the blessed Mary; the fifth in honour of the Holy Trinity and all Saints.

Here was an ancient Custom continued till the dissolution of this Priory, that if any married man would come and take his Oath before the Prior and Convent, kneeling in the Church-yard upon two hard pointed Stones, That he never repented of his marriage, nor had any brawls or contention with his Wife within a year and a day, nor ever made any nuptial Transgression in that time, then he was to have delivered to him with great Solemnity, a Gammon or Flitch of Bacon. The Records of the House mention three People that have performed this, Steven Samuel of Essex, 7. E. 4. Richard Wright of Norfolk, 23. H. 6. and Thomas le Fuller of Essex, 2. H. 8.

[Valued at 150 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.]

The Priory of the Holy Trinity, in London.

THIS Church was founded by Richard Beumeys Bishop of London and as it seems, then called Christ Church, who placed herein many Canons. Maud Wife of King Steven, David King of Scots, and many others gave Lands to this Priory. King Henry the I. gave to these Canons of the holy Trinity the Soke called Cuihtengild, and the Church of St. Botulph, with Soc and Sac, Tol and Theam, etc. King Henry the III. in the eleventh of his Reign recited and confirm'd the several Lands and Revenues given to this Priory, in which Deed he mentions Queen Maud Wife of King Henry the I. to be the Foundress of this House.

138 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

TAUNTON, in Somersetshire.

IT was found by Inquisition, Anno 10. E. 2. that this Monastery was founded by William Gifford Bishop of Winchester, on a piece of Ground on the North-side of the Town of Taunton, without the East-Gate. Among other of their Benefactors, was William de Monteacuto Earl of Salisbury, who granted to the Canons here, the Mannor and Hundred of Dulverton, cum pertin. to hold in Fee-farm, at the yearly Rent of 10 l. Which demise is dated in the Chapter of the Priory of Taunton, 11. E. 3.

[Valued at 286 l. 8s. 10d, per Annum.]

HASTINGS, in Sussex.

THIS Priory was erected here, by one Sir Walter Bricet a Knight, and dedicated to the holy Trinity. But by reason of the Inundation of the Sea the Canons were not able to remain here, whereupon Sir John Pelham Knight, by License of King Henry the IV. founded for them another Church and Habitation at Warbilton, towards the Support of which the said King Henry the IV. in the fourteenth year of his Reign granted the Mannor of Withiam, then valued at 25 l. 5s. 5d. per Annum, for twenty years, which Estate was part of the Possessions of Morteyn an alien Priory, at that time seized into the King's hands by reason of his Wars with France.

[Valued at 51 l. 9s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

St. MARY-OVERIE, in Southwark.

FOunded by William Gifford Bishop of Winchester, who here instituted Secular Canons, divers of the Family of the Earls of Warren, and of the Moubrays were Benefactors to his Priory. King Steven gave the Canons here (then Regulars) the tenth of his Farm of Southwark; Cicely Countess of Hereford gave them her Lands at Ketebrok, confirm'd by King John. Vid. infra, 940.

[Valued at 624 l. 6s. 6d. per Annum.]

BRISET, in Suffolk.

THIS Priory was founded in time of Herbert Bishop of Norwich by Radulphus Fitz-Brian and Emme his Wife, to God, St. Mary, and the holy Confessor St. Leonard. Which Founders endow'd it with divers Lands and Tithes, among which was the Tithes of Smithfield at London. From this Radulph Fitz-Bryan descended Almaricus Peche, who confirm'd all his Ancestors Donations to this House. Walter Bishop of Norwich granted to this Almaric Peche to have a Chantery in his Chappel at Briset, but that the Chaplain at his first admittance should make Oath in presence of the Prior or his Procurator (inspectis sacrosanctis Evangeliis) that he would pay over all the Oblations which he should receive in the said Chappel,

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 139

to the Mother Church; and that he should not admit any Parishioner of the Mother Church to any Sacrament unless in imminent peril of death; and in sign of subjection to the Mother Church, that the said Almaric and all his Family should repair thither to the Great Mass on five days yearly, viz. Christmass-day, Easter day, Whitsunday, the Assumption of the glorious Virgin, and St. Leonards-day.

CIRENCESTER, in Gloucestershire.

KING Henry the I. founded this Priory, by the Consent and Authority of Pope Innocent; and by the Council and common Appliance of the Archbishops and Bishops, Princes and Barons of the Kingdom, endowed it with divers Lands and Revenues, as well in the Town of Cirencester and County of Gloucester, as in Wiltshire, Somersetshire, Dorsetshire, Oxfordshire, and Northamptonshire, also with the Liberties of Soc and Sac, Toll and Theam, etc. Whose Royal Grant bears date A.D. 1133. King John was also a Benefactor to this House.

[Valued at 105 l. 7s. 1d. per Annum.]

HEXHAM, or Hagustald in Northumberland.

THIS Town situate on the South Banks of Tine, was of old time magnificent and great, and made a Bishops Seat by the blessed Wilfrid in the year 674. and so it continued for above one hundred and forty four years under the Government of twelve Bishops successively, viz.

1. Wilfridus,
2. Eata,
3. Tunbertus,
4. John,
5. St. Acca,
6. Fredbertus,
7. St. Alcmundus,
8. Tilbertus,
9. Ethelbertus,
10. Eadfredus,
11. Osbertus,
12. Tydferdus,

after which it ceased to be govern'd by a Bishop of its own. The Bishop of Durham exercising Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction here, till in the Reign of King Henry the I. it was given to the See of York. In the year 1113. Thomas then Archbishop of York placed here Canons Regular. John de Normanville, and Robert de Insula were Benefactors to the Canons here. It was found by Inquisition taken in the four and twentieth year of E. 1. That Thomas the second, Archbishop of York, did found and endow this Priory, the Lands by him given and by many other Benefactors, were all found and set forth in particular; which see in the Book at large, p. 93, 94, etc.

[Valued at 122 l. 11s. 1d. per Annum.]

STODELY, in Warwickshire.

THese Canons were first establisht at Wicton by Peter de Stodley, and by him afterwards removed from thence to Stodley, and by him endow'd with Lands, confirm'd by King Henry the II. and King Edward the III. in the first year of his Reign. To this House William de Cantilupo, William Comin, and others were Benefactors.

[Valued at 117 l. 1s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

140 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

LAUND, in Leicestershire.

THE Priory here was founded by Richard Basset and Matildis Ridel his Wife, for Canons Regular, and dedicated to St. John Baptist. It was endowed with the Town and Mannor of Lodington (within the Bounds of which it stands) as also that of Friseby, with the Tyths of several Churches, in the Neighbourhood, among others with the Church of Warleg and Chappel of Belton, and the Church of Glaeston, in Rutland. Confirm'd by Henry the I. and King Henry the II.

[Valued at 399 l. 3s. 3d. per Annum.]

THURGARTON, in Nottinghamshire.

THE Priory of St. Peter at Thurgarten was founded and endow'd with divers Lands and Tithes by Radulphus de Ayncourt. Many were the Benefactors to this House, among whom several of the Family of Vilers, all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Henry the II. and by King Edward the III. in the seventeenth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 259 l. 9s. 4d. per Annum.]

DRAX, in Yorkshire.

THIS Priory dedicated to St. Nicholas, was founded and endowed with divers Lands and Liberties by William Paganell. By Indenture dated Anno 1383. The Prior and Convent of this House did oblige themselves, in confideration of twenty Marks received, to perform a yearly Obit on the day of the Epiphany, for the Soul of Gilbert de Ounfravile late Husband of Maud Countess of Northumberland.

[Valued at 104 l. 14s. 9d. per Annum.]

MARTON, in Oxfordshire.

FOunded and endow'd by Bertram de Bulemer, and confirmed by his Grandson Henry de Nevill. This Priory, as appears by the Charter of King Henry the II. was at first given to Canons and Nuns, but the Nuns were afterwards translated to a place called Molesbi.

[Valued at 151 l. 5s. 4d. per Annum.]

BETHKELERT, in Wales.

KING Edward the I. in the fourteenth year of his Reign confirm'd the Estate and Lands given to this House by Lewelin the Great, and others.

[Valued at 70 l. 3s. 8d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 141

BOLTON, in Yorkshire.

ANno 1120. William Meschines, and Cecilia his Wife Lady and Heiress of the honour of Skipton, founded and endow'd a Monastery of Canons at Emmesey, which House was dedicated in honour of the blessed Virgin and St. Cuthbert the Bishop. In the year 1151. these Canons were translated from hence to Bolton, which Alice de Rumelli gave them in exchange for other Lands of theirs. Which Alice being Heiress to their Founder, confirm'd all his Grants, and further granted them Free chace in her Chace of Craven. Their Lands given by their several Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the II. in the fifth year of his Reign. This Priory was in some sort subject to that of Huntingdon till discharged of that subjection in the time of Pope Celestin the III. The Prior and Convent here granted to John de Insula Lord of Rougemount to maintain a Chantery of six Chaplains in the Church of Harewood, etc.

[Valued at 212 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.]

KIRKHAM, in Yorkshire.

WAlter Espec and Adelina his Wife by the consent of King Henry the I. founded the Priory of Canons of the Holy Trinity at Kirkham, and endow'd the same with divers Lands and Tithes; inter alia, with the Tithes of Venison, & ferarum silvestrium, which he and his posterity should take, and of all Foul taken in his Rivers. Likewise the said Walter granted them the tenth Penny, or Tith, of his Rents of his Lands in Northumberland. This Walter Espec was a man of a Giant-like stature, with a Voice like a Trumpet, of Noble Blood, but more noble in his Christian Piety; who having no Children of his own, tho' he had Nephews, gave the best of his Possessions to Christ, founding and endowing the Monastery of Kirkham for Canons Regular. In the year 1261. William de Roos Lord of Hamlak, among other things, granted to the Prior and Convent of Kirkham and their Successors, in lieu of the Tithes of his hunting, three good wild Beasts (tres feras competentes) also the Rent of 100s. per Annum for other Tithes, for which consideration the said Canons did quit their claim of Free-chace in Hamelak.

[Valued at 269 l. 5s. 9d. per Annum.]

LAUNCESTON, in Cornwall.

THIS Priory did stand on the West South-West part of the Suburb of the Town, and was erected by William Warwift Bishop of Exeter, for which he supprest a Collegiate Church of St. Steven, having Prebendaries, and gave the best part of their Lands to the Priory, and took the Residue himself. King John, and King Henry the III. confirm'd the Lands given them by several Benefactors.

[Valued at 354 l. 0s. 11d. per Annum.]

142 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

St. DENNIS, near Southampton.

THIS Priory was founded by King Henry the I. endowed with Revenues by King Henry the II. King Steven, King Richard the I. Humphrey de Bohun, etc.

[Valued at 80 l. 11s. 6d. per Annum.]

LEDES, in Kent.

THIS Monastery was founded Anno 1119. by Robert de Crepito-Corde, in French Creveceur, Anglice Creutor, for Canons Regular. Dedicated to St. Mary and St. Nicholas. Divers of the Name and Family of Creveceur were Benefactors, granting to them divers Revenues and Liberties, and that the Canons here should have the Custody of their House and Goods in the time of Vacation without any Impediment of them, the Patrons or their Heirs, and that upon the death of their Prior, they might freely proceed to the Election of another without leave-asking, however after Election, the new Prior must be presented to the Patron according to Custom. Confirm'd by King Edward the III. in the one and fortieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 362 l. 7s. 7d. per Annum.]

HASELBERGE, in Somersetshire.

IN the Reign of King Henry the I. lived at Haselburge a certain Priest much famed for Sanctity and for the Spirit of Prophesie, called Wulfricus. In his time William Fitz-Gualter instituted Canons Regular here and endow'd them with Possessions. But at his first undertaking this Foundation, Wulfricus told him, that Those whom he designed to introduce here would not prosper in this place. The said Wulfric died Anno 1154.

KENILWORTH, in Warwickshire.

Galfridus de Clinton, Chamberlain to King Henry the I. founded this Church for Canons Regular, in honour of St. Mary, to whom he gave all his Lands at Kenilworth, (except what he had retain'd to his Castle, and for making a Park) with many other Lands and Liberties, all which he enjoyn'd his Heir to observe and not to violate on pain of his Curse and Gods Wrath. Gaufridus his Son confirm'd his Father's Gifts, and granted them Tithes of all manner of Provisions whatsoever that came to his Castle of Killingworth. Henry his Son made the like Confirmation, and granted still more. King Henry the I. recited and confirm'd all former Benefactions, and granted the Canons here great Liberties and Immunities. The like Confirmation was made by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 538 l. 19s. per Annum.]

Vol. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 143

STONE, in Staffordshire.

WUlfer King of Mercia, was Son and Successor to Penda, a Pagan and Persecutor; he after his Father's death became a Christian and married Ermenilda a Christian Lady, Daughter of Exbert King of Kent, by whom the had two Sons Wulfad, and Russin; and a Daughter named Werburg: which two Sons being baptized by St. Cedda then a Hermit, and by him privately instructed and incouraged in Christianity, This did so offend their Father Wulfer who had apostatized from the faith of Christ, that finding them at Prayers at St. Cedda's Cell, he killed them both with his own hands, their Martyrdom happened on the 9th. Calend. August. This sad News being known to the Queen, she caused their Bodies to be inclosed in a Stone Monument, and in process of time a Church to be erected in the place where they were martyr'd. Wulfer the King being horribly tormented in mind could find no ease till he repair'd to St. Cedd, who upon his repentance and contrition, absolved him and enjoyn'd him for Pennance, to suppress Idolatry throughout his Kingdom of Mercia, and establish the Christian Religion. This King hereupon built many Churches and Monasteries, among others Peterborough Abby; and in the place where the Martyrs suffered, was erected a Colledge for Canons then called Stanes, now Stone. In after-times one of this House went to Rome as a Procurator from the rest, and obtain'd from the Pope a Canonization for St. Wulfad and St. Russin. In the time of the Normans Conquest one Robert Lord of Stafford (from whom the Barons of Stafford did descend) was chief Lord of this Place; here did Inhabit at that time two Nuns and a Priest, who were all slain by one Enysan de Walton, after which Murther, the abovesaid Robert by advice of Geffry de Clinton, did Establish here, Canons instead of Nuns. Nicholas de Stafford Son of Robert, gave this House as a Cell to Kenilworth. King Henry the II. confirmed all the Benefactions. The Church here was dedicated to St. Wulfad.

[Valued at 119 l. 14s. 11d. per Annum.]

BROKE, in Rutland, a Cell to Kenilworth.

Hugh de Ferrariis granted to the Canons of Kenilworth the Land of Broch, with the Wood-ground and Essarts, and this was by the assent of Walchelin his Nephew, and William his Brother, all which was confirm'd to the said Canons by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 40 l. per Annum.]

LANERCOST, in Cumberland.

THIS House dedicated to God and St. Mary Magdalen, was founded and endowed with large Revenues by Robert de Vallibus Son of Hubert de Vallibus, he granted to the Canons here, inter alia, Pasture and feeding in his Forest of Walton, for thirty Cows, and twenty Sows; with all the Bark of his Timber-Trees in the Woods of his Barony, with all

144 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

all the dry Wood lying any where in his Forest for the support of their House. The Church here was dedicated by Bernard Bishop of Carlile, Anno 1169. King Richard the I. confirm'd the several Lands, etc., given to the Canons of this Monastery. The abovesaid Herbert de Vallibus was the first baron of Gillesland, which Barony went by a Daughter to the Name and Family of Multan, and in like manner from them to the Family of Dacres.

[Valued at 77 l. 7s. 11d. per Annum.]

DUNSTABLE, in Bedfordshire.

HEre was formerly a very Woody place just in the meeting of those two Royal Ways of Watling, and Ickneld, which made the Passage so unsafe and full of Thieves, that there was hardly any Travelling. King Henry the I. desirous to rectifie this, caused the Woods to be cut up, and a Royal Mansion to be built near the place which was called Kingsbury. He also caused Proclamation all over the Kingdom that who ever would come and inhabit in that place, should have Land for 12d. an Acre per Annum, and enjoy the same Liberties and Freedoms as the City of London doth, or any other ancient Borough in the Kingdom, by this means People flock'd hither and built the Town, which from Dunning a noted Robber, who used to rob here, was named Dunningstable. Besides the Liberties abovementioned this Town had two Markets weekly, and a Fair at St. Peter ad Vincula for three days, and a Gallows for Felons. Within the Limits of this Borough that King erected a Church in honour of St. Peter, and built a Monastery for Canons Regular, to whom he gave the said Church, and all the Borough with its Markets, Fairs, and Liberties, retaining only in his own hands the Capital Mansion. All which, with the Grants of other Matters, were afterwards confirm'd to them by King Hen. the II. and King Rich. the I. King John did the like, and granted them also his House of Kingsbury. The said Canons had also a Court of Pleas there of their own. Some of the Tenants held in Capite of the Abbot, and some by Services to be done to the said Canons, but all were Freemen.

[Valued at 344 l. 13s. 4d. per Annum.]

SUTHWIKE, in Hantshire.

THIS Monastery was founded and endowed with divers Lands by King Henry the I. who granted them all sorts of Liberties, and Freedom from Tributes, Taxes, and Exactions, and that they should not be impleaded for any matter or thing unless in the presence of him or his Heirs.

[Valued at 257 l. 4s. 4d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 145

MERTON, in Surrey.

FOunded by King Henry the I. Anno 1121. and by him endowed with the Town of Merton belonging to his Crown, and large Liberties.

[Valued at 957 l. 19s. 5d. per Annum.]

OSENEY, near Oxford.

RObert de Oilley (whose Uncle of the same name came into England with the Conquerour, and obtained from him the Baronies of Oxford, and St. Waleries) founded this Priory for black Canons among the Isles made by the River Isis near Oxford. It is said that his Wife Edith took occasion to incite her Husband to this Foundation, from the constant assembling and chattering of certain Magpies in that place whenever she walkt out thither for her recreation. The Church here dedicated to St. Mary was built, Anno 1129. Which said Robert endowed the Canons here with divers Tenements in Oxford, and several Lands and Churches in the Neighbouring Towns. Robert one of the natural Sons of King Henry the I. having married a Daughter of the Founder, devoted himself to these Canons alive, or dead; and gave them 10 l. of Land in his Mannor of Waneting. The like did Henry de Oily his Brother-in-law out of his Mannor of Hocnorton. The other Lands granted by divers Benefactors to these Canons see in the Book at large.

[Valued at 654 l. 10s. 2d. per Annum.]

RONTON, in Staffordshire.

THIS Priory was founded by Robert the Son of Noel, in a place then called St. Mary des Essarz, and was a Cell to Haghmon in Shropshire. Whose Foundation and Endowment was afterwards confirm'd by Thomas his Son, and by R. Archbishop of Canterbury. Vid. inf. 940.

[Valued at 90 l. 2s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

PYNHAM, near Arundell in Sussex.

ADeliza, second Wife, and Widow of King Henry the I. (afterwards married to William Earl of Arundel) gave a parcel of Land then called Fyneham adjoyning to Arundell, for the maintenance of two Chaplains. William Earl of Arundell give the same Land and more, for the maintenance of Regular Canons, and building a Church to the honour of God and St. Bartlemew; he gave them also Common of Pasture in his Medow of Arundell for fourteen Cows, and two Bulls, etc. All which Gifts were confirm'd by Ranulph Bishop of Chichester.

146 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

LILLESHULL. in Shropshire.

THE Church here, dedicated to St. Alcmund, is said to have been first founded by Adelfleda a Queen of Mercia, but afterwards much amplified, and endow'd with ten Prebends, by King Edgar. Afterwards Richard Beumeys Dean of this Church, by assent of King Steven, and Authority of the Pope, gave this Church over to Canons Regular, coming from St. Peters at Dorchester, which new Monastery was dedicated to St. Mary ever Virgin. Benefactors to this House were Alan la Zouche, the Lady Hillaria de Trussebut, etc. King Henry the III. confirm'd their Estate. Vid. inf. 941.

[Valued at 229 l. 3s. d. per Annum.]

GISEBURNE, in Yorkshire.

RObert de Brus, by the Council of Pope Calixtus the II. and Thurstin Archbishop of York, founded this Priory to the honour of God and St. Mary, and endow'd it with divers Lands as well at Gyseburn as elsewhere, and with the Churches of Skelton, and Herte, etc. Robert de Brus was a noble Norman Knight, who came into England with the Conqueror, 1066. and obtain'd to himself the Castle of Skelton, the Lordships of Danby, Kendal, Anendale, Herte and Hertnesse, Karlton, and divers other Lands in the North. This Robert gave to his second Son, of his own name, Anandal in Scotland, and Herte and Hertnesse in England, and dying Anno 1141. lies buried at Gisburne Priory of his own Foundation, to whole Estate succeeded Adam de Bruse, from whom descended Peter de Bruse, who dying without issue, Anno 1273. his inheritance became divided among his four Sisters, viz. Agnes, married to the Lord Walter Fauconberg, who had for her purparty the Castle of Skelton, etc. Lucia married to the Lord Marmaduke de Tweng, who had with her Danby, etc. Margaret who married the Lord Robert de Rose, and with her went Kendale, and lastly Laderina married to the Lord John de Bellew, and had for her part Charleton, etc. From Robert the second Son of the first mention'd Robert de Brus, descended lineally Robert de Brus King of Scotland, who making War against King Edward the I. that King seiz'd upon his Lands of Herte and Hertnesse, as forfeited, and granted them to the Lord Clifford. These Bruses of the younger House gave divers Churches in Sotland to this Priory, confirm'd by William King of Scotland. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 46.

[Valued at 628 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.]

SCARTHE, near Wharlton, in Yorkshire.

THIS House founded and endowed by Steven de Manilio, was given as a Cell to Guisburne by Hugo de Rudby, Chaplain to the said Steven, and by him appointed Trustee for this purpose.

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTINE. 147

NUTLEY, in Buckinghamshire.

THIS Abby, otherwise called, Sancta Maria de Parcho, was founded and endowed by Walter Gifford Earl of Buckingham, and Ermigardis his Wife. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. and by King John with the Addition of great Liberties and Immunities, who also granted to William Marescal and his heirs, the Gift of the Pastoral Staff of the Abby of Nuteley. To the Canons here was given the Church of all Saints at Bradley in the Diocess of Sarum, in which Parish was founded a Chappel for Leperous Women; which Chappel, before it could be dedicated by Jocelin then Bishop of Saram, was publickly and solemnly declared by Oath not to be anyways prejudicial to the Mother Church in Tilhes or Obventions, etc.

[Valued at 437 l. 6s. 8d. per Annum.]

BISSEMEDE, in Bedfordshire.

HUgh de Bellocampo founded, and endow'd this Priory with divers Lands and Commons, etc. He granted the Canons here besides other things, the Priviledge to have their Corn first ground at his Mill at Hetune, after that which should be found on. All which was confirm'd by Roger de Bellocampo. He granted also the Tithes of his Park of Ettune, (tam de bosce quam essartis) as well of his Woods as arable Lands. Pope Gregory granted to this House divers Priviledges, as not to pay Tithes of their own Stock, to cellebrate privately in time of a general Interdict, etc. Here was formerly a Hermitage of great Veneration.

[Valued at 71 l. 13s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

BRIDLINGTON, in Yorkshire.

WAlter de Gant establisht Canons in the Church of St. Mary of Bridlinton, and gave them all his Estate in that Town, and confirm'd to them all other Lands which his (homines) Tenants who held of him, had given them. Gilbert de Gant, his Son, Earl of Lincoln, confirm'd all that his Father gave, etc. The like did King Henry the II. Gilbert de Gant was born, baptized, and educated in this Priory, and therefore disposed his Body to be buried here. The Archdeacon of Richmond did use in time of his Visitation to come to a Church belonging to these Canons with a train of ninety seven Horse, one and twenty Dogs, and three Hawks, and in an hours time all their Provision was utterly consumed, till at last this great Oppression was prohibited by the Bull of Pope Innocent the III. Ralph de Nevil granted to these Canons to take Stone out of his Quarry of Fivele, with a way over his Ground, for the use of their Monastery, for ever.

[Valued at 547 l. 6s. 11d. per Annum.]

148 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

St. BARTLEMEW, in Smithfield, London.

RAherus founded the Church here in honour of St. Bartholmew for Canons of St. Augustin's Rule, and himself became their Prior for the space of two and twenty years. This man had been formerly when young, a noted Drole or Jester, and by such means had become acceptable and familar to the great Ones at Court, and to the King himself. But being inspired with God's grace, he saw the Follies of that Course of Life; and finding his Conscience burden'd with many sins, he undertook a Journey to Rome; while he remain'd there he fell sick, and in his sickness made a Vow upon his return to Health, and his Country, to build there an Hospital for the Relief and Solace of Poor People. After this being restored to his Health, he began his journey homeward. On the Way St. Bartholmew appeared to him in a Nocturnal Vision or Dream, and directed him to build a Church in Smithfield at London, and name it to him. Being return'd to London, he obtain'd the King's License for this Foundation, without which it could not be effected, the Ground where the Building was appointed, being within the Kings Market-place. He began hereupon a double Work of Piety, the Hospital in performance of his Vow, and the Church according as directed, both not far distant; which last was founded, Anno 1123. in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ, and memory of St. Bartholmew the Apostle. It is said that this very Foundation in this place, was foretold long before in a Vision, to King Edward the Confessor. Before Raherus began the Foundation of this Monastery, the Ground here was all overspread with Filth and Durt, and was the common place of Execution of Malefactors. The Priory being built and Cannons assembled to inhabit it, Raherus became their Prior, who obtain'd for their maintenance sufficient from the Oblations of pious People, and from the King as large Liberties as any Church in England enjoy'd. King Henry the III. confirm'd all the Lands and Churches given them by divers Benefactors, namely, the place call'd Smithfeld, the Church of St. Sepulcher de Ballio, London, cum pertinentiis fuis infra Burgum & extra, the Church of St. Michael Bassingshagh, etc. and that the Hospital of St. Bartolmew in Smithfield should be in the Disposition and Subjecton of the said Prior and Canons.

[Valued at 653 l. 15s. per Annum.]

WARTRE, in Yorkshire.

FOunded Anno 1131. by Galfridus Trutbut, and by him endow'd with the Church of Wartre, and eleven Bovates of Land in the Field of that Town. Confirm'd by Pope Innocent the II.

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 149

Priors and Abbots of this House.

1. Joseph, Prior.
2. Radulphus, Prior.
3. Richard, Abbot.
4. Yuo, Abbot.
5. Nicholas Prior.
6. Richard Prior.
7. Thomas, Prior.
8. Radulphus.
9. John Lestyngham.
10. John de Dunelmia.
11. Robert de Lunde.
12. John Quedreke, in his time the Hospital of St. Giles of Beverly was annext to this House, Anno 1278.
13. John de Thorpe.
14. Richard de Welwyk.
15. Robert Balne.
16. William Feryby.
17. Henry Holme.
18. John Hemyngburgh.
19. William Tynyngton, deposed by the Archbishop of York.
20. Robert Takel.
21. Thomas Ruland.
22. William Wartre.
23. Robert Hedon.
24. William York.
25. William Spenser.

Several of the Trussebuts descendants of the Founder confirmed the Possessions of these Canons and so did Robert de Ros Lord of Beuver, Anno 1279. being then Patron (Advocatus) of this Priory. Pope Innocent granted to these Canons of St. James of Wartre divers Priviledges, in the Case of non-payment of Tithes for their own Goods and Stock, in the Case of a general Interdict, etc.

[Valued at 221 l. 3s. 10d. per Annum.]

TWYNEHAM, in Hantshire.

IN the Reign of King Edward the Confessor, there were Secular Canons in Christ Church at Twyneham. Ranulph Flammard, a great Favourite under King William Rufus, and afterwards Bishop of Durham, was Dean of this Church. In the Reign of King Steven Canons Regular were first introduced here. The aforesaid Ranulphus, or Randulphus, new built the Church of Twynham, which at that time bore the name of the Holy Trinity. Richard de Redvers endow'd it with Lands in the Isle of Wight and elsewhere. Which Richard de Redvers was by King Henry the I. made Earl of Devon, and had the Isle of Wight, and the Inheritance of this Town of Twineham, given to him. From whom descend the Courtney's Earls of Devon. Baldwin de Redveriis confirm'd the Estate given by his Father Richard to this Church, with the Grant of large Liberties; which Baldwin was the first who introduced Canons Regular into this Church, to whom his Son Richard de Redveriis junior, granted the free Election of their Prior, and confirm'd all their Possessions, Anno 1161. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 45.

[Valued at 312 l. 7s. per Annum,]

HERYNGHAM, in Sussex.

KING Edward the I. granted his License to William Paynel to grant certain Lands to the Prior and Canons of this House, for the finding of four Secular Chaplains to celebrate for his Soul, in their Church, Statuto de terris ad manum mortuam non ponend. edito, non obstante. Afterwards, upon the Petition of Matilda Neice, and heir of the said William, exhibited to King Edward the II. in Parliament, that King granted that instead of the four Secular Chaplains, the said Prior might for the future appoint four Regular Canons of his own House for that Office. King Edward the III. granted his License to appropriate the Hospital of St. Anthony at Coukham to this House.

150 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

St. OSITH at Chich, in Essex.

THE Priory of St. Osith the Virgin and Martyr at Chich, was founded by Richard de Belmeis Bishop of London, who design'd to resign his Bishoprick and become a Canon Regular here himself, but was prevented by death. The second Prior of this House was Ralph afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury. King Henry the II. confirm'd all the Possessions given to this Priory by several Benefactors, with the grant of ample Liberties, free Waren and a Market at Chiche. King John granted the Patronage or Advowson of this Abby to William then Bishop of London and his Successors.

[Valued at 677 l. 1s. 2d. per Annum.]

IXWORTH, in Suffolk.

GIlbert Blundus who came into England with the Conqueror, founded this Priory of the blessed Mary of Ixworth near the Parish-Church of that Town.

[Valued at 280 l. 9s. 5d. per Annum.]

NORTON, in Cheshire.

THIS Priory of the blessed Mary of Norton was founded and endowed by William the Son of Nigellus Constable of Chester. Roger Constable of Chester confirm'd the Lands and Possessions given to these Canons in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, and Oxfordshire, who also granted them divers Priviledges, inter alia, to have two Deer, yearly, on the Feast of the Assumption, out of his Park of Halton. When William Bastard, to whom King Edward the Confessor had assigned the Inheritance of his Kingdom as his most worthy and nearest Kinsman, came into England, with him came Hugh to whom he gave the Earldom of Chester. With this Hugh came a Nobleman called Nigellus, to whom the said Earl gave the Barony of Halton and made him his Marshal, and Constable of Chester, and further conferr'd on him many and great Priviledges, such as shew'd a particular favour to him more than any other Baron of Cheshire. William Son of this Nigellus founded this Priory first at Runcorn, Anno 1133. which was afterwards removed to Norton. From him descended Roger Constable of Chester abovementioned, to whom Ranulph Earl of Chester, for a particular Service done him in Wales, gave the Dominion of Shoo-makers and Stage-players to hold to him and his Heirs for ever. This Roger died Anno 1211. and lies buried in the Monastery of Stanlowe. Of this Line descended the Lacies Earls of Lincoln, and the Earl of Lancaster, Leicester, and Derby.

[Valued at 180 l. 7s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 151

NEWBURGH, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Roger de Molbray, and endowed with divers Lands and Churches; who also confirm'd what the Freemen of his Fee had given, or should give to the Canons here. In the time of King William the Conqueror Robert de Mowbray was Earl of Northumberland, who taking part with other Great men, who rise against King William Rufus for having banish'd Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury, and destroy'd eighty Religious Houses to enlarge his Forrest, was taken by the King, beheaded, and his Estate seized and afterwards given by King Henry the I. to Nigellus de Albeney, whose Mother was a Mowbray; after which time the Albanies took on them the name of Molbray. Son of that Nigellus was the first abovemention'd Roger de Molbray, who founded this Priory, Anno 1145. he founded also the Abby of Bellaland, and many other Religious Houses to the number of thirty five. From whom descended Thomas Mowbray who in the Reign of King Richard II. was made Duke of Norfolk, Earl of Nottingham, Lord Marshal of England, etc. From whom descended two Co-heirs, the eldest of which Ann, was married to the Lord Thomas Howard, who in the second year of King Edward the IV. was created Duke of Norfolk.

[Valued at 367 l. 8s. 3d. per Annum.]

HODE, in Yorkshire, a Cell to Newburgh.

HOde was at first demised to the Canons of Billalanda, by Robert de Alneto, on condition that they should here found an Abby of their Canons. This was confirm'd by Roger de Mowbray. Adam Fossard gave Hode to the Canons of Newburgh with Lands lying about the same, which Canons did acknowledge the said Adam to be the Patron (Advocatus) of the said place, and of all belonging thereunto.

EGLESTON, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

PHilip Bishop of Durham confirm'd to God, St. Mary, and St. John, and to the Canons of Egleton, divers Lands which Gilbert de Ley held of him by the service of one Knights Fee, and had given them. Anno 1273. the Abbot and Canons of this House covenanted with John Duke of Britany, and Earl of Richmond, to find six Chaplains Canons of this House, to say six Masses daily in the Castle of Richmond, forever, the said Canons to be constantly resident in the said Castle, in consideration whereof the said Earl of Richmond granted to the Abbot and Convent of Egleston divers Lands and Possessions, and a place apart in his said Castle for the Habitation of the said six Chaplains, etc.

DORCHESTER, in Oxfordshire.

BEfore the Norman Conquest here was a Bishops Seat; Remigius translated it to Lincoln. Alexander Bishop of Lincoln erected here an Abby of black Canons; the Body of which Church served for the Parish Church. After the Suppression the East-part of the Abby-Church

152 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

was bought by a rich man of this Town for 140 l. and given to augment the Parish Church.

[Valued at 219 l. 12s. per Annum.]

THORNTON, upon Humber, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by William Grose Earl of Albemarl, Anno Dom. 1139. Canons Regular were introduced here from Kyrkham, under the Government of one Richard their Prior, who was afterwards made Abbot in the year 1148. by Pope Eugenius the III. Earl William the Founder died, Anno 1180. having endow'd this Abby with many Lands and Revenues. King Richard the I. confirm'd all the Possessions given to the Abby of St. Mary of Thornton and the Canons there, with the Grant of large Liberties and Immunities. Pope Celestine the III. granted them the Priviledge not to pay any Tithes of Cattle, etc for their own use.

Abbots of this House were

1. Richard.
2. Philip, 1152.
3. Thomas, 1175.
4. John Benton, 1184.
5. Jordan de Villa, 1203.
6. Richard de Villa, 1223.
7. Jeffrey Holme, 1233.
8. Robert, 1245.
9. William Lyncoln, 1257.
10. Walter Hotoft, 1273.
11. Thomas de Ponte, 1290.

The Advowson of this Abby, together with all the Lands, and Possessions of the Earl of Albemarl, did escheat to King Edward the I. Which being thus in the Crown, King Edward the III. in the sixth year of his Reign granted, by advice of the Prelates and Barons in Parliament, that the said Advowson should remain ever annext to the Crown; and that the said Abbot should not be oblig'd to attorn to any, in case any grant of the said Advowson should be made.

[Valued at 594 l. 17s. 10d. per Annum.]

BRUMMORE, in Wiltshire.

BAldwin de Riveris and Hugh his Unkle, were the Founders of this Monastery for Canons Regular, King Henry the II. confirm'd the Lands given them, and granted them feeding for one hundred Cattle, and one hundred Hogs in Newforest, and dead Wood for their fuel as much as necessary.

HAREWOLD, in Bedfordshire.

THIS was a Priory of Nuns of St. Augustin, founded by Sampson de Forte, Malcolm King of Scotland, as Earl of Huntington confirm'd certain Lands to this Church of St. Peter of Harewold, and to the Prior, and Canons, and Sisters there serving God. The like did King William of Scotland. King Henry the IV. of England gave to the Prioress and Nuns of Harewold, one Messuage in Chakistone of the yearly value of 2s. with the Advowson of that Church.

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 153

BRINKEBURNE, in Northumberland.

FOUNDED by William Bertram, Hawys his Wife, and Roger his Son, for Canons. Their Possessions were confirm'd by William Earl of Northumberland, Henry Earl of Northumberland Son to the King of Scotland, and by King Henry III.

[Valued at 68 l. 15s. 1d. per Annum.]

LEYE, in the Isle of Gersey, Diocesse of Oxon.

THIS was at first a Priory of Canons, but afterwards in the Reign of King Edward I. it was changed to a Nunnery of Canonesses, it was dedicated to St. Mary and St. John Evangelist.

BRIWETON, in Somersetshire.

William de Moyne Earl of Somerset gave divers Lands, etc. to the Canons Regular of this House, which was before the Conquest an Abby of Monks founded by Algarus Earl of Cornwall, but the said Moyne, or Mohun, placed Canons here since the Conquest. Sauvaricus Bishop of Bath and Glastonbury confirm'd to God and the Blessed Mary of Briweton, and the Canons Regular there, the Lands, etc., given by their Benefactors.

[Valued at 439 l. 6s. 8d. per Annum.]

BRADENSTOKE, in Wiltshire.

FOunded and endowed by Patricius Earl of Salisbury and Walter his Father. William Bishop of Sarum appropriated divers Churches to the proper use of these Canons, salvis Vicariis ordinandis & taxandis. King Henry III. confirm'd all their Possessions.

[Valued at 212 l. 19s. 3d. per Annum.]

NOCTON in Lincolnshire.

THE Priory of Nocton Park was founded by Robert de Areci, Lord of Nocton. It was dedicated to St. Mary Magdelen. The Heir general of Norman de Arcy descended from the Founder, married to John de Lymbury. The Possessions given by several Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Henry III. in the 55th. year of his Reign.

[Valued at 44 l. 3s. 8d. per Annum.]

WIGMORE in Herefordshire.

OLiver de Merlymond cheif Seneschal of all the Lands of Hugh de Mortimer, in the time of King Steven, built the Church of Schobbedon which Town his said Lord Hugh de Mortimer had given him in Consideration of

154 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

his Service. This Oliver being kindly entertain'd at St. Victors Abby at Paris in his return from a Pilgrimage, he was so highly pleased with their good life and Regular devotion, that he afterwards obtain'd from the Abby two of their Canons to come over and Institute a House of Religion at his new built Church of Schobbedon, to which he annext divers Lands and profits. But after this a great dissention arising between the said Hugh de Mortimer and Oliver de Merlymond, in so much that the said Oliver departed from his Service and went to Miles Earl of Hereford, Mortimer seized upon all his Estates, and took from the Canons all the Goods which Oliver had given them, whereby the said Canons were reduced to such extreamity that they were about to leave their House. But this difference, being at last composed by the mediation of the Bishop of Hereford, Mortimer not only restored them their Lands, etc., of which he had deprived them, but gave them more, among other Benefactions, the Church of Wigmore, and advanced their Prior to the title of an Abbot. But soon after he took from them again the Town of Schobbedon, and it was once more restored by mediation. After this these Canons removed their habitation to a place call'd Eye, and from thence to Wigmore. After this they removed once more into the Field of Beodune, where they built from the ground a Monastery and Church, which Church was dedicated to St. James by Robert Folyoth then Bishop of Hereford, the aforesaid Sir Hugh de Mortmer, conferring thereon at the Dedication great Benefactions both in Lands, and Plate for the Altar. Which Sir Hugh died a Chanon of this House, being very antient. Whose Son and heir Sir Roger de Mortimer behaved himself so unkindly to the Canons of this House, that the Abbot and most of the Convent were forced, for some time to retire to Schobbedon, but the difference was made up by the Interposition of King Henry. Isabel de Ferrers Widow of the said Sir Roger, built a House of Religion at Lechelade after her Husbands decease, and endow'd it with Lands for the good of his Soul. The said Sir Roger tho' unkind at first, yet before his death confirmed all that his Father had given to these Canons, with other Lands given by himself.

Among those 260 most famous and valiant Knights that King William the Conqueror brought into England with him in his Army, was Ralph de Mortuomari one of the chief; which Ralph obtain'd to himself the Lordship of Wigmore, and other Possessions in the Marches of Wales.

This Ralph built the Castle of Wigmore, and left issue Hugh and William, Hugh became the Founder of the Abby of Wigmore, as has been said, and endow'd it largely Anno 1179. and dyed in this Monastery Anno 1185. Grandson of this Hugh was Ralph de Mortuomari, who being sent over into Normandy by King John in order to defend that Country against the King of France, who had invaded and Seized all Normandy (because King John refused tho several times summon'd, to do homage for the same) was by the said King of France taken Prisoner. During whose absence from these Parts the Welch invaded this Monastery of Wigmore, plundered the Canons of all their movables, and burnt all the Buildings except the Church. Son of which Ralph was Roger, who marryed Matilda daughter of William de Breuse Lord of Bregnoc, and was so faithful an adherent to King Henry III. against his rebellious Barons, that he was the chief means of defeating that formidable Commotion, and establishing the King in his Throne. Grandson of this Roger, was Roger Mortimer who was created the first Earl of March, Anno 1. Edward III. Which

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 155

Earl Roger was great grandfather of Edmund Mortimer who married Philippa only daughter and heir of Leonel Duke of Clarence, second Son of King Edward. III. Which Edmund having buried his said Wife went over into Ireland the Kings Lieutenant, and Anno 1381. departed this life in that Kingdome, being but twenty nine years of age. His body was brought over, and buried in this Abby Church of Wigmore, with his Countess, and most of his Ancestors. Which Edmund and Philippa had issue two Sons Roger, and Edmund, and two Daughters Elizabeth and Pbilippa. Roger Mortimer was slain in Ireland, Anno 1398. But left Issue by his Wife Alianora daughter and coheir of Thomas Holland Earl of Kent, two Sons Edmund and Roger, and two daughters Anne and Alianore. Anne was married to Richard de Condsborough Earl of Cambridge. The two Sons, and the other daughter died all without issue.

[Valued at 267 l. 2s. 10d. ob per Annum.]

THORNHOLME, in Lincolnshire.

IT was found upon Inquisition at the Assizes at Lincoln, 4 John, that King Steven founded this Priory and placed Canons in it. That Henry. II. gave the Mannour of Aplebi, in which the Priory is scituated, to William de Lungespe his Brother, who after gave the Manour to John Malekerbe.

DERLEY, in Derbyshire.

HUgh the Priest, intitled Dean of Derby, gave to Albinus, and his Canons of St. Helens near Derby, the Land which he held at Little Derby, for the erecting of a Church and Habitation for him and the said Canons, with divers Lands of his Patrimony. Which Estate the said Albin and his Successors, Abbots of this House, quietly enjoyed all the time of the life of the said Hugh, and of Henry his Son, which Son he begat in lawful marriage before he received holy Orders, and of two daughters and heiresses of the said Henry, who dying in the Reign of King Henry. III. that King supposing the said two daughters to die without heirs, claim'd the whole of this Abby as an Escheat. Vid. Vol 3. p. 57.

[Valued at 258 l. 14s. 5d. per Annum.]

St. AUGUSTINS at Bristol, in Gloucestershire.

ROBERT Fitz Harding a Burgesse of Bristol, to whom King Henry II. gave the Barony of Berkly, built this Abby, and gave to the Canons Regular of this House, the Church of Berkly, with divers others. Whose Estate was confirm'd to them by King Henry. II. while he was yet Duke of Normandy and Earl of Anjou: also by John Earl of Morton, etc.

[Valued at 670 l. 13s. 11d. ob per Annum.]

156 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

COKESFORD near Rudham, in Norfolk.

JOhn de Querceto (or Cheney) gave to God, and St. Mary, and the Canons of Rudham divers Lands, Churches, and Mills, & Duos homines scilicet G. & V. & terram illorum, two of his Tenants with the Land which they held of him. Hervey Beleth gave them the Mannor of Rudham for the maintenance of an Hospital, by him founded at Boycodeswade.

[Valued at 121 l. 18s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

BRUNNE, in Lincolnshire (Bourn).

FOunded by Balwin Son of Gislebert, who endow'd it with divers Lands, Churches, and Tithes of sundry kinds, Anno 1138. The Wakes were principal Benefactors to this House, and became Patrons of the same, being Lords of the Mannor of Bourn, and descended from the Founder, and as Patrons had the Custody of the Abby in time of Vacation, etc. which was allowed by King Edward the II. who for that purpose granted his mandate to Matthew Broun Escheator for the Counties of Lincoln, Northampton, and Roteland, in the seventeenth year of his Reign, notwithstanding that some of the Possessions of this Abby were held of the King in Capite.

NEWENHAM, in Bedfordshire.

BEfore the Conquest, the Church of St. Paul in Bedford was a Colledge of Prebendaries or Secular Canons, till one of the Canons killing a Butcher, they were forced to remove their Habitation to a place call'd Newenham, a Mile distant from Bedford, and there they became Regular Canons. Roisia Wife of Paganus de Bellocampo, to whom King William the Conqueror gave the Barony of Bedford, and Simon her Son, were the founders of their House at Newenham. Which Simon endow'd them with divers Lands and Possessions, among others the Church of St. Paul at Bedford with all its Possessions, and the Tithes of the Mill of the Castle of Bedford, etc. These Canons had also large Liberties granted them on the River, for fishing, and for keeping Swans as many as they pleased; feeding for thirty Hogs yearly quit of Paunage in the Wood of Kerdington, free Pasture for twelve Oxen, in all the Grounds of the Patron where his own Oxen fed, with Liberty to elect their own Prior, saving to the Patron the Custody of the outward Gate of the Monastery in time of Vacation, etc. All whose Lands and Liberties were confirm'd to them in 15. R. 2. by Thomas Earl Mareschal, and Earl of Nottingham, Lord Moubray and Segrave, then Patron of this Priory.

[Valued at 293 l. 5s. 11d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 157

St. RADEGUNDIS at Bradsole, in Kent.

KING Henry the III. confirm'd the several Lands and Revenues given to this House by sundry Benefactors, among whom Henry de Wengham Dean of St. Martins in London. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 69.

[Valued at 98 l. 9s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

KIME, in Lincolnshire.

THE first founder of this Priory was Sir Philip de Kyme Knt. the Canons of this House held Lands in Thorpe, and Billingey.

[Valued at 101 l. 0s. 4d. per Annum.]

BUTLEY, in Suffolk.

FOunded by Ranulph de Glanvilla, and by him endowed with divers Churches and Lands, in the year 1171. This Ranulph de Glanvill was heretofore Chief Justice of England, and left only three Daughters, among whom he parted his Land before he made his Voyage to the Holy Land, to the eldest who married one William de Aubervil, he gave the intire Mannor of Benhall and the Advowson of the Monastery of the blessed Mary of Buttele, and to the other Sisters other parts of his Estate. Vid. Vol. p. 110.

[Valued at 518 l. 17s. 2d. per Annum.]

NEWSTED near Guildford, in Surrey.

FOunded by Rualdus de Calua and Beatrix his Wife with the assent of William Malbanc their Heir, in honour of the blessed Virgin Mary, and St. Thomas the Martyr, in a place call'd Aldeburi in the Mannor of Sandes, for Canons Regular; whose Estate was confirm'd by King Henry the III. and King Edward the II.

BERLIZ, in Somersetshire.

THE several Lands, Churches, and Tithes given to the Prior and Cannons of this House, dedicated to St. Nicholas, by Matilda de Say and others, were confirm'd by King Henry the III. Anno Regni 40. and by Edw. the III. Anno 13.

WOMBRIGGE, in Shropshire.

FOunded by William Fitz-Alan. Dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Leonard. Many were the Benefactors to this House, among whom the Lords of Cherinton gave divers Lands and venues in that

158 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

Town, etc. All the Possessions of these Canons, with divers Liberties to them granted by their severeal Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the II. Anno Reg. 12.

[Valued at 65 l. 7s. 4d. per Annum.]

CALDEWELL, in Bedfordshire.

Simon Basket an Alderman of Bedford was the first founder of this House, but the Advowson came afterwards to the Lords Latymer. Robert Son of William de Houton gave Lands to the Order of Fryers of the Holy Cross at Caldewell, confirm'd by King Hen. the III. Anno Reg. 57.

[Valued at 109 l. 8s. 5d. per Annum.]

TONEBRIGGE, in Kent.

FOunded by Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford, for Canons Regular, and by him endow'd with certain Rents, the feeding of one hundred and twenty Hogs yearly in his Forrest of Tonebrigge freely, and to have yearly one Buck at the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen.

ANGLESEYE, in Cambridgeshire.

ELizabeth de Burgo Sister and one of the Heirs of Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, Patroness of this Priory, granted the Monks here liberty to choose their Prior, Anno 1333. The same Elizabeth granted a Rent of 20 l. per Annum to the Prior and Convent of this House, in consideration of which they obliged themselves to find two Chantry Priests, Seculars, to celebrate at the Altar of the holy Cross in their Church for ever, for the said Elizabeth her Ancestors and Heirs, and to allow to the said two Priests their Lodging and Diet, and to each 20 s. per Annum, or else twelve Marks yearly, which they shall think most convenient; which Grant bears date 6. E. 3.

[Valued at 24 l. 19s. per Annum.]

TRENTHAM, in Staffordshire.

RAlph Earl of Chester was the Founder, or rather Restorer, of this House; granting to the Canons here a yearly Rent of 100s. per Annum. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. with the grant of large Liberties and Immunities.

[Valued at 106 1. 3s. 10d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 159

WORMLEY, in Herefordshire.

STeven de Ebroicis gave to this Church, dedicated to God, and St. Leonard, and to the Canons here, certain Mills, Lands, and Tithes in Lenhale, for the maintenance of these Chaplains. Confirm'd by Gilbert de Lacy in consideration of 100s. by the said Canons to him paid. And by William Son of the said Steven, Anno 1240. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 48.

[Valued at 83 l. 10s. 2d. per Annum.]

ROYSTON, in Cambridgeshire.

FOunded and endow'd by Eustach de Merc. King Richard the I. confirm'd to this Monastery by the Name of the Monastery of St. Thomas the Martyr apud Crucem Rhosiae, and to the Canons here, all their Possessions given by several Benefactors, and further granted a yearly Fair during all Whitsun-week, and a Market every Wednesday, with the same Liberties as were enjoy'd by the Canons at Dunstable, with very large Immunities in his Grant specified, dated in the first year of his Reign.

ERDBURY, in Warwickshire.

RAlph de Sadle was a principal Benefactor to the Canons of this House. Anno 1232. Alexander then Bishop of Coventry and Litchfeild, order'd the following Settlement between the Prior of Erdbury, and the Vicar of Dercet, and their Successors, viz., that the Vicar should have all the Altarage of the said Church, and Tith Corn of eight yards Land in Radewey, and of two yard Land in Derced in the Demeans of the said Prior, with a House, etc. That the Vicar of the said Church should be a Priest and not of any lesser Order, and shall have an Associate constantly, and a Deacon, who together with him shall officiate in the said Church, the Vicar to bear all usual Charges except the Repairs of the Chancel, for which the Prior and he are to joyn proportionably. This Monastery being decay'd in its Revenues, King Henry the VI. Anno 23. granted the Prior and Convent License to obtain and receive Lands and Tenements to the value of one hundred Marks without fine to the King.

[Valued at 94 l. 6s. 1d. per Annum.]

POGHELE, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Ralph de Chadelewurth, dedicated to God and St. Margaret, endow'd with divers Lands and Revenues by the said Ralph and others, all which was recited and confirm'd by King Henry the III.

160 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

ROUCESTRE, in Staffordshire.

RIchard Bacun founded and endowed this House for Canons Regular, with large Possessions and Liberties: All which were confirm'd to the said Canons by Ranulph Earl of Chester, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms. Confirm'd also by King Henry the III. in the thirtieth year of his Reign.

[Valued at 100 l. 2s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

CUMBWELL, in Kent.

FOunded by Robert de Turneham, dedicated to God, and St. Mary Magdalen, endow'd with divers Lands and Possessions, all which were confirmed by Steven de Turnham, Son of the said Robert, and by King Henry the III. Anno Reg. 11.

[Valued at 80 l. 17s. 5d. per Annum.]

WOSPRING, in Somersetshire.

THE several Lands, Rents, etc. given to this Church, dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Thomas the Martyr, by William de Courteney and others, were recited and confirm'd to the Prior and Canons here, by King Edward the II. Anno Reg. 18. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 47.

[Valued at 87 l. 2s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

MARLEBURGH, in Wiltshire.

KING Richard the II. Anno Reg. 22. granted his Pardon to the Prior and Convent of St. Margaret near Marlbergh (which House was founded by his Progenitors) for having accepted divers Lands of John Lovel Chevaler, without License first obtain'd; and further ratified and confirm'd the Possession of these Lands to the said Convent.

VICHURCH, in Wiltshire.

KING Henry the III. granted to the Prior and Canons of this House certain Lands and Priviledge in his Forrest of Clarendon; King Edw. the III. granted more, also Pasture for forty Oxen and Cows in his Meadow of Clarendon, and 100s. of Rent out of his Mannor of Clarendon. King Hen. the II. founded this Monastery for four Canons.

[Valued at 122 l. 18s. 6d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 161

BUCKENHAM, in Norfolk.

FOunded by William Earl of Chichester in honour of God, St. Mary, and St. James, and by him endowed with Churches, Lands, and Tithes. Confirm'd by King Edw. the II. Anno Reg. 11.

[Valued at 108 l. 10s. 2d. per Annum.]

COLDE-NORTON, in Oxfordshire.

KING Hen. III. Anno Reg. 15, confirm'd to the Prior and Canons of this House, dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, their several Lands and Possessions given by Reginald Earl of Bolon, and Ida his Wife, and divers other Benefactors. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 55.

OSULVESTON, (Ouston) in Leicestershire.

FOunded by Robert Grimbold in honour of our Lord Jesus Christ, St. Mary, St. Andrew the Apostle, and all Saints, for Canons; to whom he gave the Church and Town of Osolvestone, etc., in pure and perpetual Alms. Robert Bishop of Lincoln confirm'd the several Churches granted to this Monastery, and further, granted to these Canons to be for ever free and quit from the Payment of Sinodals, and all other Episcopal Customs except Peter pence, denouncing a Curse to such as shall infringe or violate his Grant. Robert Grimbold was a Judge under King Henry the II. whose Seal did represent a Figure setting in Judgment, holding in one hand a pointed Sword, signifying Justice, and in the other a Sword with the point abated or broken off, representing Mercy. Among other Benefactors to this House was William de Ros Lord of Beaver, etc.

[Valued at 161 l. 14s. 2d. per Annum.]

THORKESEY, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the III. Anno Reg 21. granted to the Prior and Canons of this House the Scite of their Monastery in Frankalmoine, and four hundred and ninety eight Acres of Land, and fifty Tofts in Torkesey to hold at the yearly Rent of 10 l. for ever. Beside which the Prioress and Convent of Fossa near Torkesey held one hundred and twenty Acres of Land and Meadow, and seven Tofts in Torkesey at the yearly Rent of 46s.

[Valued at 13 l. 1s. 4d. per Annum.]

CHAUCUMBE, in Northamptonshire.

FOunded and endow'd by Hugo de Chaucumb. Amabilia de Segrave Lady of Chaucumbe, and others of the Segraves were Benefactors; all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the III. Anno Reg. 2.

[Valued at 83 l. 18s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

162 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

REPINDON, in Darbyshire.

FOunded Anno 1172. (18. H. 2.) by Matilda Widow of Ranulph Earl of Chester, and dedicated to the holy Trinity. King Hen. the III. Anno Reg. 57. confirm'd to the Canons of the holy Trinity of Rependene, and of St. Giles of Calc. all the Lands and Possessions given them by the said Matilda, and others; the like did King Edw. the II. Anno Reg. 18.

[Valued at 118 l. 8s. 6d. per Annum.]

KAERMERDIN, in Wales.

KING Henry the II. gave and confirm'd to the Church of St. John the Evangelist at Kayrmerdin, and the Canons there, the old City of Kayrmerdyn with its appurtenances, with the Church of St. Peter there, and the Chappel in the Castle.

[Valued at 164 l. 4d. per Annum.]

WIKES, in Essex.

KING Henry the II. gave to God and the Nuns of St. Mary at Wikes, the Church of Wikes, with certain Land and seven Villains in that Town. He also granted them two Grayhounds, and four other Dogs (Bracatos) for taking Hares in his Forrest of Essex; with divers other Liberties and Immunities.

BISSETER, in Oxfordshire.

GIlbert Basset gave to the Canons of this House large Possessions, so did William Lungespeye, among other things Pasture for fifty Cattle at Erdintone, to feed among his own Cattle there; another Benefactor was Philip Basset Brother of Fulc Basset Bishop of London. All whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edw. the II. Anno Reg. 9.

[Valued at 147 l. 2s. 10 d. per Annum.]

HERTLAND, in Devonshire.

FOunded by Gaufridus Son of Oliver de Dynam; and the Canons Secular, changed to Canons Regular of St. Augustin by the Authority of Bartholomew Bishop of Exeter. All whose Possessions King Richard the I. in the first year of his Reign, confirm'd with the Grant of great Immunities, and Liberties, namely to have a Court to hold plea of all things, but Life and Member, arising in their own Lands and Estate, etc.

[Valued at 306 l. 3s. 2d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 163

HELAGHE, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Bertramus Haget, in a place where formerly was a Hermitage in some sort belonging to the Prior and Convent of Marton who by their Deed, under their Convent Seal, did disclaim, resign, and quit all title to the same, Anno 1203. The Lord Jordan de Sancta Maria marrying Alice an Heir General of the foresaid Bertram, became a second Founder of this Priory, who confirm'd their Estate, and so did Alice his Widow after his decease.

Priors of Helaghe Park.

1218. William de Hamelecis. 1233. Elias. 1257. John Nocus. 1260. Hamo de Eboraco. 1264. Henry de Quetelay. 1281. Adam de Blide. 1300. William de Grimstone. 1320. Robert de Sposford, 1333. Steven Levington. 1357. Richard. 1358. Thomas de Yarum. 1378. Steven Clarell, 45 years. 1413. John Birkyn. 1419. Thomas York.

1435. Richard Areton, translated to Gisburn. 1437. Thomas Botson, translated to Bolton. 1440. Thomas Collingham. 1460. Christopher Lofthous, under an ill Character, for the Book says, furatus est bona hujus domus. 1471. William Berwick. 1475. William Brammam, Vicar of Helagh. 1480. William Ellington. 1499. Peter Kendayl.

William de Percey Lord of Kildale gave to the Canons of St. John the Evangelist of Helagh-Park, the Chappel of St. Hilda at Kildale with divers Lands, for which the said Canons were to find two of their own House or two Secular Priests, to celebrate the Divine Offices in the said Chappel for ever.

[Valued at 72 l. 10s. 7d. per Annum.]

CANONS-ASHBY, in Northamptonshire.

THe Pynkeneyes Lords of Wedone were great Benefactors to the Canons here, giving them divers Lands in Wedone and Weston, with Common for 100 Sheep, 8 Oxen, 5 Cows, and 5 Mares in the Pasture of Wapham, and feeding for Sixscore Hogs in the Woods there.

[Valued at 119 l. 4d. per Annum.]

HAVERFORD, in Wales.

Robert de Haverford gave to the Canons here divers Churches and Tithes in his Barony of Haverford, all which were confirm'd to them by King Edward. III. Anno. Reg. 5.

[Valued at 153 l. 11s. 1d. per Annum.]

164 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

WODHAM, in Essex.

THis place being formerly a Hermitage of St. John Baptist, Maurice de Tiretia founded here a Priory of Canons, and gave them divers Lands, confirm'd by King Henry. II.

IPSWICH, in Suffolk.

KIng John in the fifth year of his Reign confirm'd to the Canons of the Church of the holy Trinity at Gypewic, the several Lands, Churches, and Possession, given them by many Benefactors, among the rest a Fair to last for three days at the Feast of the holy Cross in September.

FINSHEVED, in Northamptonshire.

FOunded and endow'd with divers Lands and Possessions by Richard Engaine, Lord of Blatherwick, in the Reign of King John. After the year 1367 the Male Line of the said Founder failing, his estate hecame divided among three Sisters, married to the Families of Goldinton, Pabenham, and Bernake. John Engayne gave divers Lands in Blatherwick. and Laxton, to the Canons of the blessed Mary of Finnisheved for the maintenance of two Chaplains in the Chappel at Finnisheved, and two other Chaplains in the Chappel of Blatherwick.

[Valued at 56 l. 10s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

KEINSHAM, in Gloucestershire.

FOunded by William Earl of Gloucester, at the desire of Robert his Son, then dying. Dedicated to God, the blessed Mary, and the Apostles St. Peter and St. Paul. Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford confirm'd the several Lands, Possessions and Liberties, given to the Canons of this House, and so did also King Edward II. Anno Reg. 11.

KIRTMELE, in Lancashire.

WIlliam Marescallus founded and endow'd this Priory for Canons, providing that it should always remain a Priory independent of any other House, yet it should never be made an Abby, and upon the death of the Prior, two Canons to be chosen and presented to him or his heirs, of which he or his heirs to elect one to be made Prior. Confirm'd by King Edward II. Anno Reg. 17.

LESNES, in Kent.

FOunded by Richard Lucy, Prefect of England, Anno 1178. In the year 1179, the same Richard quitting his Office of Chief Justice, became

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 165

himself a Canon Regular of this House, and soon after died and was here buried. The Lands and Possessions given to these Canons by their founder, and others, were confirm'd to them by King John, and King Edward. II.

BURSCOUGH, in Lancashire.

FOunded and endow'd with large Possessions by Robert Lord of Latham. King Edward I. granted to these Canons to have a mercate every Thursday, and a Fair for five days at the Feast ofthc Decollation of St. John Baptist yearly, at their Mannour of Ormeskirk. Walter Lord of Scaresbrek and many others were Benefactors, all whose gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edward. II. Anno Reg. 17.

[Valued at 80 l. 7s. 6d. per Annum.]

STENERDALE, in Somersetshire.

RIchard Lovel Chivaler, gave certain Lands of the value of 40s. to the Prior and Convent here for the finding of one Chaplain to celebrate daily for the Souls of the said Richard and his Ancestors, in the Church of this Priory. This House was founded by the Ancestors of Richard de Sancto maure; and united to the Monastery of Taunton, 24. Henry VIII.

DODFORD, in Gloucestershire.

FOunded and endow'd by King Henry I. But in process of time the Revenues of this House being so decay'd that there remain'd here but one Canon, it was united to the Abby of Hales Owen, Anno 4. Edward IV.

The Abby de PRATIS, near Leicester.

FOunded Anno 1143. by Robert Earl of Melent and Leicester, and largely endow'd by him and others with Churches, Lands, Rents, Tithes, and Liberties, in and about Leicester and elsewhere with the grant of two Bucks yearly, one at the Feast of the Assumption, and one at the Feast of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, etc. Margaret de Quincy granted to the Canons here divers Possessions, among other things House-bote and hay-bote, and timber for repairs, out of her Forrest of Charnwood, as often as occasion requires; also one Buck yearly out of the said Forrest, Roger de Quincy granted them among other things the right Shoulder of every Deer taken in his Park of Acle, and free pasture for all their Cattle throughout the Forrest of Leicester. Their Possessions were confirm'd by King Steven, and King Henry II. Robert Earl of Mellent came into England with the Conqueror who gave him the Earldom of Leicester, which City being destroy'd with the Castle there, he re-edified the Church of St. Mary in the said Castle, and placed in it twelve Secular Canons and a Dean, appropriating thereunto all the Churches in Leicester (except St. Margarets which is a Prebend of Lincoln) with divers Lands. Robert his Son and Heir having founded the Abby de Pratis transferred all the Possessions

166 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

and Prebends of the Church of St. Mary to his new built Abby. This last mentioned Robert (commonly call'd Bossu) took the Habit of a Canon Regular in this Abby, and died here, Anno 1167. He also founded an Abby of Monks at Geroudon, and a Nunnery at Eaton, in which his Countess Amicia became a Nun. After some time the Male Line of this Robert failing, the Estate became divided between two Sisters Co-heirs, Amicia married to Simon de Montefort, and Margaret married to Sayer de Quincy. These Canons had also a Grant of one Load of Wood, daily, out of the Forrest of Leicester, ad focum domus infirmariae Canonicorum, for Fewel to serve in the Infirmary.

[Valued at 951 l. 14s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

GRIMESBY, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the I. founded and endowed this Priory, granting to the Canons here among other things, the tenth Penny of all his Farmes in Leiseby, and Grymesby, and the Tith of all Fish in his Port of Honslet, in pure and perpetual Alms, with large Liberties and Immunities. All which were confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 9 l. 14s. 7d. per Annum.]

St. THOMAS the Martyr near Stafford.

FOunded by Richard Peche (Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, 1162.) who in his later days became a Canon Regular in this House, in which Habit he died and was buried; his Episcopal Habit being taken away by his Cosin G. Peche a Monk of Coventry. Robert de Ferrars Earl of Derby gave to this Priory certain Lands together with his Body, after his decease, to be buried here.

[Valued at 141 l. 13s. 2d. per Annum.]

NEW-STEAD, in the Forrest of Sherwood, in Nottinghamshire.

FOunded by King Henry the II. for Canons Regular, to whom he gave the Town and Church of Paplewic and other Lands, with large Liberties. Also two great Wastes called Kygell, and Ravenshede. King John while Earl of Morton gave other Lands, all which he confirm'd after he was King, Anno 6.

[Valued at 167 l. 16s. 11d. ob. per Annum.]

HICKLING, in Norfolk.

FOunded and endow'd by Theobaldus de Valeines. Confirm'd by King John. Anno Reg. 5.

[Valued at 100 l. 18s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 167

STONELEY, near Kimbolton, in Huntingdonshire.

THIS was a Priory of seven Canons, founded by William Mandeville Earl of Essex. To this House the Rectory of Kymolton was appropriated. The Bigrames were Benefactors and lay here buried.

[Valued at 46 l. 0s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

MODBERLEY, in Cheshire.

FOunded by Patricius de Modberley for Canons Regular, and by him endow'd with several Lands and Commons of Pasture. He also granted the Canons free power, upon the decease of their Prior, to elect another according to their own pleasure.

SPINEY, in Cambridgeshire.

FIRST founded by Beatrice Malebisse one of the Co-heirs of the Lordship of Wikes, within the said Lordship, for three Canons Regular. Afterwards Maria de Basingburne, encreased the number to four, two of which were to come daily and officiate in the Church of Wykes. She also gave a Messuage and other Lands for the Prior and Canons to maintain therein seven Poor men, allowing to each daily a Loaf of a Farthing, and among all a measure of Ale of a Penny, to each three Ells of Linnen Cloath at two pence per Ell, and every two years a Woollen Garment price two shillings and six pence, etc. Also to make three distributions of Alms per Annum to three thousand poor People. But these Charges being found to extend to much more then the Revenue of the Lands by her given, Richard Aithilwald and Matilda his Wife Cousin and Heir of the Foundresses, did Anno 6. H. 5. release the coming of the two Canons to the Church of Wykes, and changed the three distributions abovesaid, to the giving thirteen shillings and four pence yearly in Alms to the Poor of Wykes, etc. King Henry the VI. Anno 27. granted his License to the Prior and Convent of this House to give their Convent and all their Revenues to the Prior and Convent of Ely.

MOTESFONT, in Hantshire.

FOunded by William Briwer who endowed this Priory with divers Lands, and gave his Mannor of Merton for the maintenance of four poor men in Diet and Aparel, etc. Divers others were great Benefactors, among whom Peter de Rivallis Brother of the Founder then commonly call'd The Holy Man in the Wall: Alienora Wife of King Edward the I. gave divers Possessions for an Anniversary, and for daily Alms to seven poor Widows, etc. Confirm'd by Margery de la Ferte or Feritate Daughter of William Briwer, and Coheir after the death of William her Brother; William Son of Reginald de Brus married Grace eldest Daughter and Co-heir

168 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

of this William Brewere, from whom descended four Daughters, married to the Earl of Hereford, Cantelow, Fitzherbert, and Mortimer. The Estate of these Canons was confirm'd by King John, Anno 6.

[Valued at 114 l. 3s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

FRITHELSTOKE, in Devonshire.

IT was found by Inquisition 15 John. That Robert Son of Robert de Bello Campo founded and endow'd the Priory of Canons here dedicated to God, the blessed Mary and St. George; saving to the Patrons the liberty of appointing one to guard the Gate of the said Priory in time of Vacation, and take care that the Goods of the same be not wasted, the said Guardian to have nothing but his sustenence, and upon confirmation of a new Prior to retire.

[Valued at 127 l. 2s. 4d. per Annum.]

WROXTON, in Oxfordshire.

FOunded by Master Michael Belet in the time of Hugh Bishop of Lincoln, and by him endowed with his Mannors of Wroxton, where it was founded, and Thorpe near Rowell in Northamptonshire. Confirm'd by King Hen. the III. with Liberties of Sac and Soc, etc.

[Valued at 78 l. 13s. 4d. per Annum.]

DE PRATO, between North-Creyke and Burnham, in Norfolk.

ANno 1206. Robert de Nerford founded a Church here, which Robert was principal Warden of Dover Castle under Hubert de Burgo then Chief Justice of England. He also built a Chappel to the honour of St. Bartholomew with an Hospital for thirteen poor men, and four Chaplains and a Master. After the death of the said Founder, the said Master and his Brethren took the Habit of Canons Regular, and from that time were called Prior and Canons. The Chappel and new erected Priory was dedicated, Anno 1221. Alice Widow of the said Robert made several Orders for the Government of the said Hospital, among others that the Brethren who should be admitted into the said Hospital should at their entry promise Chastity, and Obedience to the Master, that none should have property, and that a Light should burn night and day in the Church. After that the said Alice confirm'd with Warranty all the Lands and Possessions given to this House, to the Canons for the same. She at last convey'd the Advowson and Patronage of this Priory to King Hen. the III. who made it an Abby, and confirm'd all their Possessions, Anno Reg. 15.

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 169

ACORNBURY, in Herefordshire.

THE Lady Margery de Lacy founded this Priory for Nuns, and endow'd it with the Forrest of Acornbury, as was found by Inquisition, Anno 49. H. 3. which King in the fiftieth year of his Reign confirmed their Estate. Catherine de Lacy Daughter of the Foundress gave certain Lands to these Nuns for the finding of a Chaplain to celebrate daily in their Church for the Souls of her Ancestors, and in case the said service should not be duly performed, then the Bishop of Hereford to compel the Prioress and Nuns to the performance. Margaret Widow of Walter de Clifford gave her Heart to these Nuns, to be buried in their Church, and with her Heart, fifteen Marks sterling, in Alms; this was by Deed dated, 1260. John de Breuse gave to the Nuns of Cornebery the Rents of ten (Burgagia) Borough-houses in Tettebiri, which Gift was confirm'd by William his Son, 18. E. 1.

[Valued at 67 l. 13s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

BILSINGTON, in Kent.

FOunded Anno 1258. by John Mansel Provost of Beverley, who endow'd it with certain Land; in Bilsington, and granted that upon the death of the Prior, the Superior and Convent should have the Custody of their own House and all their Possessions, and might proceed to the Election of a new Prior without License first obtain'd from any one. Some of the Lands of this Priory being overflow'd by the Sea, King Edw. the III. granted the Canons License to drain, and include the same with Walls according to the Law of the Marish. This was after a writ of ad quod dampnum first sued out and return'd.

[Valued at 81 l. 1s. 6d. per Annum.]

BRADLEY, in Leicestershire.

FOunded by Robert Bundy, it had but two Canons. Of later time, the Lord Scrope had the Patronage.

[Valued at 20 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.]

MICHELHAM, in Sussex.

FOunded by Gilbert de Aquila in honour of the Holy Trinity, for Canons, and endowed with divers Lands, free Pastures, and Priviledges in his Wood Grounds in Sussex. All which with other Lands given by many other Benefactors were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the II. Anno Reg. 14.

[Valued at 150 l. 12s. 6d. per Annum.]

170 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

RATLINGCOPE, in Shropshire.

LEwelin Prince of North Wales granted his Letters of Protection to the Canons of this House, to exempt them and theirs, from all Rapine and Depredation or any other molestation by the bordering Welch, and this was on the account of one Walter Corbet a Canon of this House, his Kinsman.

RAVENSTON, in Lincolnshire.

PEter Chaceport Keeper of the Kings Wardrobe, having bought certain Lands here with the Advowson of the Church, Hugh his Son and Heir surrender'd them into the hands of King Henry the III. who with them founded and endow'd a Priory of Canons, granting them to have the custody of their own House in time of vacation, and not to be charg'd with any Sustentation or Pension to any Clerk, Servant, etc., or keeping any of the Kings Horses.

GLANNAUCH, in Wales.

FOunded and endow'd by Lewellin Prince of North-Wales, Anno 1221. After him several other Welch Princes confirm'd the Estate and Possessions of the Canons of the Isle of Glannauch. So also did King Edw. the I. Anno Reg. 25.

CHETWODE, in Buckinghamshire.

FOunded by Robert Grosteste Bishop of Lincoln. Here was formerly a Hermitage and Chappel of the holy Martyrs St. Steven and St. Laurence, founded by Sir Robert de Chetwode Knt. It was vulgarly called a Hermitage, not that it was the Habitation of a Hermit, but because it was situated in a solitary Place. This Priory was given with all its Possessions to the Abby of Notteley, 1. E. 4.

LACOCK, in Wiltshire.

FOunded by Ela Widow of William Longaspata, for Nuns, among whom she her self took the Habit, Anno 1236. and after became Abbess of this House. This William Longespee was Son of King Henry the II. and Earl of Rosmar and Salisbury in Right of Ela his Wife, descended from Walter de Ewrous, to whom King William gave the said Earldom of Salisbury. The said Countess Ela founded two Monasteries in one day, viz. 16 Cal. May Anno Dom. 1232. Namely Henton for Carthusians, and this of Lacock for Canonesses. The said Ela became Abbess here, Anno 1240. resign'd 1257. died 1261. aged 74.

[Valued at 161 l. 9s. 2d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 171

SELEBURNE, in Hantshire.

FOunded by Peter de Rupibus Bishop of Winchester, and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Churches, saving to the Vicars of the said Churches a Sufficient sustentation, the Presentation to the said Vicarages to belong to the Prior and Canons.

KIRKBY Beler, in Leicestershire.

ANno 13 Edward I. Roger Beler of Kirkeby founded a House of one Custos and 12 Chaplains to Celebrate in the Chappel of St. Peter at Kirkby, and gave them the Advowson of the said Church, and the Mannour of Buckminster. Vid. inf. 246.

[Valued at 142 l. 10s. 3d. per Annum.]

ASHERUGGE, in Buckinghamshire.

EDmund Son of Richard King of the Romans and Earl of Cornwall, founded here a House for a Rector of Good men Brothers of the Church, in honour of the precious bloud of Jesus Christ; there were to be 20 Brethren, of which 13 at least to be Priests. For the maintenance of these he gave divers Lands, Possessions, Liberties, and Priviledges, among other things to be free and quit of all Tolls, etc. and to be quit of Scutage as oft as it should happen; also to have the Custody of their own House on the death of their Rector, and Liberty to chose another without presenting him to the Patron. Vid. infra.

[Valued at 416 l. 16s. 4d. per Annum.]

KIRKBY Belar.

ANno 1316. Roger Beler was slain in Leicester. After whose death, his Widow with the assent of his Son and heir translated the Chantry of secular Priests by him founded at Kirkby to the use of Canons Regular, of whom the first Prior came from the Abby of Olustone (Ouston).

The issue of Roger Belar the first Founder failing, the Bishop of Lincoln became Patron.

More of ASHRUG.

THe Lord Edmund Earl of Cornwal, who founded this House of Religious Men call'd Bones homines, or Bonhomes, was buryed in the Church here, wherein was carefully preserved a small parcel of our Lords Bloud, with the heart of Thomas de Cantilupo Bishop of Hereford the holy Confessor, and other Reliques.

172 CANONS REGULAR VOL. II.

RIGATE, in Surrey.

SEems to be founded by some of the Warens Earls of Surrey, John de Waren Earl of Surrey released to the Canons of this House a Rent of 19s. 4d. one plow-share, four horse-shooes and nails, which the said Canons used to pay yearly to his Ancellors for certain Tenements in Reygate, he also granted to these Canons 46s. 11d. per Annum for the Celebrateing one Masse daily in his Castle of Reygate, for ever.

[Valued at 68 l. 16s. 8d. per Annum.]

HALTEMPRISE, in Yorkshire.

THis Monastery was first founded and endow'd at Cottingham by Thomas Wake, Lord of Lydel, with License of King Edw. II. Pope John XXII. granted to the said Thomas Wake Liberty to translate the said Monastery from thence to Altemprise. The said Thomas Wake granted to the Canons, Regular of this House several Mannours and Lands with Great Liberties of Leets, etc., and Commons of Pasture, etc., in pure and perpetual Alms, with general Warranty. John de Meaux of Bewyke by his Deed dated Anno 1361 (31 Edward III.) gave to the Prior and Convent of this House his Mannour of Willardby, etc., conditionally for six Canons to celebrate for the Souls of him and his Ancestors, etc. Matins Masse, Vespers and Complin, etc., and in the case of non performance of the Conditions his heirs to re-enter.

[Valued at 100 l. 0s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

BADLESMERE, in Kent.

King Edward II. Anno 13. granted his License to Bartholmew de Badesmere to found and endow a House of Canons Regular in his Mannour of Badlesmere, with a Non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

MAXSTOKE, in Warwickshire.

FOunded by William Clinton Earl of Huntington, in honour of the holy Trinity, the Blessed Virgin, St. Michael, and all the Saints, for Canons Regular, viz. One Prior elective, and a Convent of twelve Canons. In whose deed of Foundation, dated Anno 1336, he appointed several Ordinances relating to their habit, the Election of the Prior, none to meddle with the Custody of the House in time of the Vacation but who the Superior and Convent shall appoint, Of the quality of such as are to be received for Canons, Of the Number of Canons to be encreased, as the Revenue increases, The Prior and Convent not to sell or grant any Corrodies or Pensions unlesse compelled by inevitable necessity. Of the Accompt, Of the founders Anniversary, Of the number of Masses, That at the end of every Office of our Lady the Priest who Officiate shall say the Angelic Salutation, in manner following, Ave Maria, gracia plena Dominus tecum, Benedicta tu in Mulieribus & benedictus fructus ventris tui Jhesus, Amen.

Vol. II. of St. AUGUSTIN. 173

Et benedicta sit venerabilis mater tua Anna, exqua tua Caro virginea & immaculata processit. Amen. With some other Orders; all which were confirm'd by Roger Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, Anno 1337. King Edw. the III. granted his License to these Canons to exchange their Mannor of Shustoke, for certain Lands in Maxstoke.

[Valued at 87 l. 12s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

BISHAM, in Barkshire.

FOunded by William de Monteacuto Earl of Sarum and Lord of Man, and Dynbeghe, who by his Deed dated Anno 1338. endow'd the Canons here with divers Lands, Churches, and Rents, and granted that upon the death of the Prior, neither he nor his Heirs should intermeddle with Custody of the House, or any of their Possessions. King Henry the V. Anno 8. gave License to Matilda Widow of John de Monteacuto Earl of Sarum, to remove the Bones of her said Husband buried in the Abby of Cirencester, to this Priory of Bustlesham and bury them here.

[Valued at 285 l. 11s. ob. per Annum.]

FLANESFORD, in Herefordshire.

FOunded by Richard Talebot, in honour of God, St. Mary the Virgin, and St. John Baptist, for Canons Regular, and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Possessions, which Lands being held of the King in Capite, King Edw. the III. Anno 20. granted his License for so doing.

[Valued at 14 l. 8s. 9d. per Annum.]

EDINDON, in Wiltshire.

WIlliam de Edindon Bishop of Winchester being born in this Town, founded in the Parish-Church of Edindon a perpetual Chantry for Secular Chaplains, and endowed the same with sufficient Revenues, but being afterwards minded to turn the same to a Priory of Brethren of St. Augustines Order called Boni homines (or Bonhomes) he laid the Foundation of a Monastery, Anno 1352. which was dedicated in honour of St. James the Apostle, St. Catherine, and all Saints, by Robert Bishop of Sarum, Anno 1361. William de Edyndon the Founder died, Anno 1366.

[Valued at 442 l. 9s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

DERTFORD, in Kent.

FOunded by King Edward the III. for Nuns of St. Augustines Order, living under the Care of the Friers of the Order of Preachers, and and by him endow'd with Lands and Revenues in Kent, and elsewhere, they enjoy'd also divers Houses and Rents in London, all which was confirm'd to them to hold in Frankalmoine, by the Grant of the said King, dated in the six and fortieth year of his Reign. King Richard II. Anno 8.

174 CANONS REGULAR. VOL. II.

granted to the Prioress and Convent of this House (Monasterium Sororum Praedicatissarum de Derford) the Mannor of Massingham in Norfolk with its Fairs, Markets, and Liberties, etc., for the finding of one Chaplain to celebrate in the Chappel of the Infirmary of this House, and for the Relief and Sustentation of the Sisters and Brethren in the said Infirmary.

[Valued at 380 l. 9s. ob. per Annum.]

SYON, in Middlesex.

FOunded by King Henry the V. Anno Reg. 2. To the honour of the holy Trinity, the glorious Virgin Mary, the Apostles and Disciples of God, and all Saints, especially St. Briget, for sixty Nuns of which number one to be Abbess, of the Order of St. Augustin, and for five and twenty Religious Men, of which number thirteen to be Priests, four Deacons, and eight Laymen, all to be under the Government of the Confessor. To live separately, viz. The Nuns in a part of the House by themselves, and the Confessor and Brothers in a part distinct, chastely both in mind and body, according to the Regular Institute of St. Bridget. This Religious House was founded in his Mannor of Istelworth in the Parish of Twykenham, near the Thames, and called by the name of the Monastery of St. Saviour, and St. Briget of Syon, of the Order of St. Augustin: by which name or Title the said Abbess and Nuns were enabled to purchase Lands, to sue, and be sued. Matilda Newton was appointed the first Abbess, and William Alnewyk the first Confessor. The said King Henry the V. endow'd this House with the Rent of one thousand Marks to be paid yearly out of the Exchequer, till he or his Heirs should settle Lands of that value.

[Valued at 1731 l. 8s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

SOme other Houses are reckon'd of this Order, of which there remains little or nothing of note but only their Names, which are Flixton, in Suffolk; Hempton, in Norfolk; Wodebrigge, in Suffolk; Leyes, in Essex; Ulvescrofte, in Leicestershire; St. John Baptist at Exeter; Canonleghe, in Devonshire; Shelbrede, in Sussex; Torpington, in Sussex; Merkeby, in Lincoln; Westwde, Kent; St John, Northampton.

Hospitals

Vol. II. 175

Hospitals for the Infirme,

Of St. AUGUSTINS Order.

It was Decreed in the Council of Lateran, Anno Dom. 1179. That where a Number of Leperous People are gather'd together in Community they shall be permitted to enjoy to themselves a Church, Church-yard, and Priest of their own. But they must take care that this be no ways injurious or prejudicial to the Rights of Parish-Churches. Yet shall not the Leprous or Lazer-houses be compelled to pay Tithes of the increase of their own proper Cattle.

St. LEONARD's Hospital, in York.

ANno Dom. 800. King Egbert in a Parliament at Winchester, changed the name of his Kingdom of Britain, into that of England. Anno 934. Athelstan succeeding his Father King Edward the elder in this Kingdom, he substituted Howel, King of Wales, and Constantin, King of Scotland, saying, it was more glorious to wake a King than to be one. Which Constantin (more Scottorum perjurium non timens) (they are the Authors words) soon after rebell'd against him, and wasted the Northern parts about Northumberland. Hereupon King Athelstan rais'd an Army and in his Journey towards Scotland made his Supplications to God for Victory, at Beverlay, York, and Durham; after which he overcame Constantin; and imploring Almighty God to shew some token whereby the present and future Ages might know that the Scots ought to be subject to the Kings of England, he strook his Sword into a Rock of Stone near Dunbar Castle, and made therein a gash of an Ell deep, which remains (says my Author) to this day. This King returning out of Scotland Victorious, did divers works of Charity, in particular, he gave to the Clergy or Ministers of the Church of St. Peter at York, call'd Colidei, for the better Relief of the Poor, and Maintenance of Hospitallity, certain Revenues, and a piece of Ground for erection of an Hospital; which Hospital when built was call'd the Hospital of St. Peter, until the Reign of King Steven, who built there a Church in honour of St. Leonard, after which it was called the Hospital of St. Leonard. King William Rufus, King Henry the I. King Henry the II. and others were Benefactors to this Hospital. Walter de Langton Master of this Hospital in the 22. E. 1. made certain Orders for Government of the Brothers and Sisters in the same, containing an exact direction how the Chaplains were to spend the day both in the Church and out of it, in their Religious Offices, etc. That the Lay Brothers should not go beyond the Door of the Nave of the Church unless in processions, that the Sisters have a convenient place appointed for them in the Church, that

176 HOSPITAL. VOL. II.

neither any of them, nor the Lay-Brothers, go out of the Bounds of the Hospital without leave, etc.

[Valued at 362 l. 11s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

CARMANS Spittle, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by one Aceborne in the time of King Athelstan, for one Alderman and fourteen Brothers and Sisters, in the Town of Flixton. Designed for the Relief of Travellers that they might not be exposed to Wolves and other wild Beasts of the Woods; the said Founder endowing it with divers Possessions in Flixton, with common of Pasture for twenty four Cows and one Bull, etc. The Vicar of the Church of Folketon, in which Parish this Hospital was situate, was used yearly on the Feast of St. Andrew the Apostle, to cellebrate a Solemn Mass in the Chappel of this Hospital; the Assistants at which Mass enjoy'd several Indulgences. King Henry the VI. Anno 25. confirm'd the Possessions and Liberties of this Hospital naming it for the future Carmans Spitell.

St. GREGORY's Hospital, in Canterbury.

FOunded by Lanfranc Archbishop of Canterbury without the North-Gate of the City. For infirm Men, and Women to live a part in separate Divisions of the House. The said Lanfranc built near this Hospital a Church in honour of St. Gregory the Pope, placing Canons therein who were to take care of the Souls of the said Poor, and were to receive their Provision daily from the Hospital, these Canons were endow'd with fair Revenues, which in the year 1384. were taxt or estimated in the whole at 133 l. 15s. These Canons were at first Secular, as establisht, by Lanfranc, but afterwards they were changed into Regulars by William Archbishop of Canterbury.

[Valued at 121 l. 15s. 1d. per Annum.]

BRACKLEY, in Northamptonshire.

RObert Earl of Mellent, who came into England with the Conqueror, founded this Hospital, where his Heart was kept intire, preserved with Salt. Anno 6. Hen. 5. Matilda Widow of John Lord Lovel granted her Mannor of Bagworth and Thornton in Leicestershire to certain Trustees and their Heirs, for them to grant to Thomas Coltone, and several others then Members of this Hospital, Pensions for Life; and by another Deed dated 8. H. 5. declared her Intention and Will to be to change this Hospital into a Priory of Friers, Preachers, consisting of twelve and a Prior, the Kings License being first obtain'd; after which the said Trustees to re-enfeoff her or her Heirs with the said Mannor, or convey it to them back again. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 83.

Vol. II. HOSPITALS. 177

St. JULIANS near St. Albans, in Hertfordshire.

THE Church and House of St. Julian near Eyewode was founded for Lazares, by Gaufridus Abbot of St. Albans with the advice and consent of his Convent, and endow'd with divers Tithes and parcells of Tithes in St. Albans, Bradewey, and elsewhere. Confirm'd by King Henry the II. For the Government of these Brethren several Orders were made, as that their Habit should be a Tunick, and Supertunick of plain Russit, that they should be single, or if married to separate from their Wives, both parties being willing; that no Woman should enter into the House except the common Laundress, or a Mother, or Sister, to visit their Relation when sick with License of the Custos, that every Brother at his admitance should make Oath to obey the Abbot of St. Albans and his Archdeacon, etc.

RIPPON, in Yorkshire.

FOund by Inquisition, that it was founded by Thurstan Archbishop of York, for the Relief of Poor and Leprous People. Endow'd with Revenues given at first to certain Sisters who lived here, wherewith to find a Chaplain to celebrate in the said Hospital, and to relieve all such Leperous People, who, being born in Ripschire, should repair to this House, where they were to receive one Garment called Bak, and two pair of Shooes per Annum, and every day to each man one Loaf, half a Flagon of Ale, etc. Which said Sisters being dead, the Archbishop that then was gave the Hospital to the Possession and Government of a Master and certain Chaplains, but in time Leperous People decaying, in the 15. E. 3. there were neither Brothers nor Sisters in this Hospital, otherwise it remain'd as it ought. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 89.

St. GILES, in the Suburbs of London.

QUeen Maud Wife of King Henry the I. built on the West-side of London a House for the Relief of Leperous People, with an Oratory, and call'd it the Hospital of St. Giles. It was endowed with several Revenues by the said Queen and others, all which were confirmed by her Grandson King Henry the II. Vid. inf. p. 400.

St. MARY of Bethelem without Bishopsgate, in the Suburbs of London

Simon Fitz-Mary Cittizen of London, having an extraordinary affection to the memory of the Incarnation and Nativity of our Saviour which was wrought in Bethelem, gave all his Lands in the Parish of St. Butolph without Bishopsgate, to a Church of St. Mary of Bethelem by him there erected, and for the instituting of a Priory of a Prior, Canons, Brethren and Sisters, to live according to the Rule and Order of the Church of

178 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

St. Mary at Bethelem, all which were to wear the Sign of a Star on their outward Garment; this Priory was also for the reception of the Bishop of Bethelem, or any of the Canons or others belonging to that Church when they should come into England, to which Bishop as a sign of Subjection, this Priory was to pay a Mark yearly at the Feast of Easter in nature of a Rent. The Deed of Foundation and Endowment of this House by the said Simon Fitz Mary bears date, Anno 1247.

St. MARY's Hospital without Bishopsgate, at London.

FOunded by Walter Brun Citizen of London, and Roisia his Wife, on a parcel of Land given for that purpose by Walter Fitz Aldred Alderman, and endowed with divers parcells of Land and Rents of Tenements in several Parishes in and about London.

A Composition was made between John Witing Rector of the Church of St. Butolph without Bishopsgate, and Godefrey then Prior; and the Canons, and Brethren of this Hospital, about Parochial Rights; containing, that the said Prior should pay to the said Rector, in lieu of Tithes and Offerings for the territory and space of Ground belonging their Priory, 10s. yearly, at four quarterly Payments; in all other their Lands without the said Bounds Tithes to be paid; the said Prior and Canons to admit no Parishoner of the said Church to make oblation, or pay any Right that is due to the Parish Church, nor to be buried with them, unless the Parish Church be first satisfied, and for the Performance hereof the said Prior made Oath before the Bishop of London, and so were all his Successors to do. The first Stone of this Hospital was laid by Walter Archdeacon of London, Anno 1197.

[Valued at 478 l. 6s. 6d. per Annum.]

St. BARTLEMEWS Hospital in the Suburbs of London.

KING Henry the I. granted and confirm'd to the Prior and Canons of St. Bartholomews and to the Poor of the Hospital belonging to that Church, very great Liberties (Et liberam esse ficut coronam meam), whose Charter bears date Anno 1133. (33. H. 1.) This Hospital was founded for the receit of all poor infirm People, till such time as they should be cured of their Infirmities, and for the lying in of poor Women, and maintenance of their Children (in case the Mothers should die in Childbed in the Hospital) till the said Children be seven years old. On this Account King Edward the III. freed the Master, Brethren, and Sisters, of this House, from being taxt to the Publick Taxes of that time.

[Valued at 305 l. 6s. 7d. per Annum.]

St. INNOCENTS near Lincoln.

FOunded by King Henry the I. for ten Lepers and a Warden, with two Chaplains and a Clerk, and endowed with several Rents, etc., as appeared by Inquisition in the Reign of King Edward the III. at which

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 179

time there was here, nine Brethren and Sisters, and but one of those a Leper, and he taken in not of Charity, but for 100s. paid for his entrance; here were also seven Women taken in for money, contrary to the first Institution. King Henry the VI. Anno 35. granted this Hospital and all the Revenues thereunto belonging, after the death of the then Warden, to William Sutton Master of the Order of Burton, St. Lazarus, Warden of the Hospital of St. Giles of Lepers without London, and to the Brethren of the said Order and their Successors, for the finding and maintenance of three Lepers of the Kings Household Servants, if any such shall be, etc.

ILLEFORD, in Essex.

THis Hospital was Founded by the Abbess and Convent of Barking for thirteen Leperous Brethren, two Chaplains, and a Clerk. For whose Regular Government Ralph de Baldock Bishop of London made Certain Orders, viz. That the Lepers were to be chosen out of the Demeasns of the Abby of Barking if any such there. That the Abbess present to one place, and the Master and Brothers to the next alternately, That no married Leper shall be admitted unless the Wife is minded to vow Chastity, That every Brother shall constantly frequent the Divine Offices at the Church unless hinder'd by Sickness, etc. That no Woman be admitted to enter the said Hospital, unless the Abbess, near Relations to visit when Sick, or the Common Laundress, and that at open day, That no Leper shall go abroad without special License, That the Abbess shall appoint the Master of the said Hospital, That every Leper shall at his reception make Oath to live chastly, to be obedient to the Abbess and Convent of Barking, to have nothing in propriety, etc. Which Orders bear date Anno Dom. 1346.

[Valued at 16 l. 1 3s. 3d. per Annum.]

St. PETERS in the City of York.

KIng Henry. I. gave and confirm'd to the Hospital of St. Peter at York divers Lands by him, and Eustachius Fitz- John, and others, granted together with divers Liberties, as Sac & Sec, Tol & Them, etc., and as a more especial Mark of his favour to this House took to himself the name of a Brother and Warden of the same (Frater enim & Custos ejusdem Domus Dei sum). The Like did King Henry III. and King John. Their Possessions were also confirm'd by King Henry II. and King Edward I. Other Benefactors were William de Fortibus, Earl of Albemarl, Several of the Percys, and Moubrays, etc.

St. MARY MAGDALEN at Colchester, in Essex.

FOunded by Eudo Seneschal of King Henry I. by that Kings Command. King Richard I. granted to the Lepers of this Hospital a fair two days yearly, viz., on the Vigil and day of St. Mary Magdalen.

180 HOSPITALS. Vol. II.

St. JOHN, and St. Leonard, at Alesbury, in Buckinghamshire.

FOunded and endow'd by Robert Ilhale, Robert atte Hide, etc. for the maintenance of Leperous and other poor People of Aylesbury; Confirm'd by King Henry I. and King Henry II. These were two Hospitals. That of St. John valued at 3ss. 4d. per Annum and that of St. Leonard at 20s. per Annum. But it was found by Inquisition, 34 Edward. III. that for eleven years before, they were both decay'd, and their Possessions come to the hands of Laymen.

BURTON Lazers, in Leistershire.

FOunded for Leperous people by Roger de Moubray, and dedicated to God, St. Mary, and St. Lazerus of Jerusalem, and by him endow'd with divers Lands in Burton. Nigellus de Moubray granted to this House the Tith of all the Meat and Drink of his Family wherever he should inhabit, and charged his Heirs diligently to perform the same. William de Burdet gave to Burton St. Lazarus, and the infirm Brethren of Jerusalem, the Hospital of Tilton, and the Church of Louseby, etc. Sir John Digby Knight, and Thurbert de Rochebi, etc. were also Benefactors. Confirm'd by King Henry II. and King John. King Edward III. granted to the Master and Brethren of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem in England, Founded for Lepers, and Souldiers that fight against the Enemies of the Cross, to be free and quit of all Tenths, Tallages, and other Aids and Contributions granted or to be granted to the King and his Heirs.

[Valued at 265 l. 10s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

St. GILES, without London. Sup. p. 381.

KING Edward the III. Anno 27. at the Request of the Master of the Order of Burton St. Lazarus in England, and in consideration of the Release of a yearly Rent of forty Marks formerly granted out of the Exchequer to the said Master and Brethren of that Order, granted to the said Brethren and their Successors the Custody of the Hospital of St. Giles without London.

YARUM, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Alan de Wilton, who gave to this Hospital divers Lands in Hooton to hold at the yearly Rent of two Marks, also other Lands in Mydilton, for the maintenance of three Chaplains in the said Hospital and thirteen poor people. The same Alan did afterwards grant this Hospital and all its Appurtenances in pure and perpetual Alms, to the Canons of Helagh-Park. The like grant was made to the said Canons by Peter de Brus, which Peter de Brus gave divers Lands to the Brethren of this Hospital, with free grinding in all his Mills, and free Pasture for all their proper Cattle, in his Land.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 181

St. JAMES near Westminster.

THE Master of the Hospital of St. James near Westminster being summon'd in a Quo Warranto 22. E. I. appear'd and pleaded, that King Henry the III. granted to the Leperous Women of St. James without London, near Westminster, their Lands then given, or to be given, to be held with Soc, and Sac, Thol and Them; and that King Edward the I. granted them a Fair yearly on the Vigil, day, and Morrow of St. James, and for four days following, & prosert, etc. Ideo praedictus Magister, quoad hoc sine die, etc.

TANREGGE, in Surrey.

ODo Dammartin gave to God and the Hospital of St. James in his Village of Tanregge, and to three Priests there serving God, certain Lands, etc., for the maintenance of Infirm and poor People, and Travellers, he also gave them his Relicks, two Silver Cups for the making a Chalice, with all the Vestments, Books and other Furniture of his own Chappel.

[Valued at 78 l. 8ss. 10sd. ob. per Annum.]

ST. JOHN BAPTIST at Stamford, in Lincolnshire.

THIS Hospital dedicated to St. John Baptist and St. Thomas the Martyr, consisting of a Master and Brethren, was founded by one Syward; among other Benefactors were Richard de Humez and Bertram de Verdun who gave part of a Meadow lying near the Bridge towards the North, wherein to build a Church and make a Coemitery. Confirm'd by King Richard I. and by Pope Alexander. It was situated at the end of Stamford-Bridge, on the South side; for the Reception of Travellers and poor People.

SAUTINGEFELD, near Wytsande.

KING Henry the II. confirm'd divers Lands to this Hospital and to the Brethren here serving God.

SCARDEBURGH, in Yorkshire.

THE Hospitals of St. Nicholas, and St. Thomas the Martyr, were erected by certain Burgesses of Scardeburgh, and were both under the Inspection of the Bayliffs and Burgesses of that Town, etc., as was found by Inquisition, Anno 26 Edw. the I.

182 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

St. GILES, without Shrewsbury.

KING Henry the II. granted to the Poor of this House a Rent of 30s. out of his Farm of Shropshire. King Henry the III. granted them out of every Sack of Corn coming to Shrewshury Market, a handful of both hands, and out of every Sack of Wheat a handful of one hand, also a Horse-load of dead Wood daily in his Wood call'd Linewood, for their firing.

ROMENALE, in Kent.

FIRST founded by Adam de Cherrings in honour of the blessed Martyrs St. Steven, and St. Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury, and by him endow'd with Lands, Rents, and Possessions for the maintenance of certain Lepers, and one Chaplain. But in process of time this Hospital becoming decay'd and neglected, by reason, chiefly, that no Lepers could be found to inhabit here for many years, John Franceys Patron of this Hospital, Anno 37. Edward the III. in order to revive and restore the same, made divers Orders, viz. That in lieu of the Lepers that used to be here, there should for the future be two Priests to celebrate for the Founders and Benefactors, one of which to be Custos or Master, to be instituted and inducted by the Archbishop of Canterbury, and to be Resident, which two Priests shall celebrate daily in the Chappel of this Hospital, Matins, and the Canonical hours; that upon the death of the Custos, the Patron to present another to the Archbishop of Canterbury to be admitted Custos, within the space of two Months, or in default of the Patron, the Jurates of the Town of Romenale, or the major part of them, etc.

St. BARTHOLMEWS without Oxford.

THE following Orders were made in the Parliament at Lincoln, Anno 9. Edward the II. That there should be six infirm Brothers of this Hospital, and two found Brothers to labour about the Affairs of the House, each of which eight, to receive 9d. a Week; that there should be a Priest to be the Master of the said Hospital to say Mass daily, and to administer the Sacraments to the Infirm, his Salary six Marks per Annum. Queen Margaret Widow of Edward the I. was during her Life Patroness and Visitor, and after her death the King or his Chancellor. The said King Edward the II. Anno 14. granted his License, the former Ordination non obstante, for the Master and Brothers of this Hospital to admit John Serthe into the next void Place, the said John having given eighteen Marks, to the Repairs of the Chappel, then ruinous.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 189

MAIDEN-BRADLEY, in Wiltshire.

MAnserus Byset, a Baron, did first institute this House for Leperous Women, and appointed there certain Secular Priests, who he named Curators of the Women. Hubert Bishop of Salisbury translated those Priests into Canons Regular. The Church of Kiderminster was appropriated to this House, by Roger Bishop of Worcester, after the death of Robert then Parson. This Manserus, or Manafferus Byset was Dapifer, or Sewer, to King Henry II. King Henry III. confirm'd the several Lands and Possessions given to the Leperous Sisters of Maiden Bradelegh, and to the Prior and Brethren there.

[Valued at 180 l. 10s. 4d. per Annum.]

St. THOMAS of Acon, in London.

King Edw. III. Anno 14. confirm'd to the Master and Brethren of this Hospital divers Lands, Tenements, and Rents in London, and elsewhere, as Westhame, Stratford, Bromley, and Stepney, etc. Jeffrey Fitz Peter Earl of Essex granted to the Brethren of this Hospital of St. Thomas the Martyr of Acon, the Custody of the Hospital of St. John Evangelist at Berchamstede.

Anno 23. Henry the VI. John Neel then Master, and his Brethren of this House, exhibited their Petition in Parliament, setting forth, that Thomas Son of Theobald de Helles, and Agnes his Wife, Sister of St. Thomas the Martyr Archbishop of Canterbury, gave to the Master and Brethren of this House then being, all the Land with the Appurtenances sometimes belonging to Gilbert Beckit Father of the said St. Thomas, in which Land the said Martyr was born, to make there a Church in Worship of God, the blessed Virgin, and the said Martyr, which Lands lye in the Parish of St. Mary of Colchirche in London, that the Endowment of the said Hospital was enlarg'd by King Henry the III. Anno 52. in which house have always been, ever since, a Master and Brethren professing the Rule of St. Austin, and Priests and Clerks to the number of twelve or more, that of old time this House hath been dispoiled, and great part of their Evidences lost and destroyed, they pray therefore that his Majesty by the assent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and by the Authority of this present Parliament would ordain, stablish and approve, that the Master and Brethren of the House or Hospital of St. Thomas the Martyr of Acres in the City of London, may by that name plead and be impleaded, purchase Lands, have a Common Seal, and choose their own Master, presenting him to the Ordinary, and that they may not be charged with any Corrody or Pension, and that their present Lands and Possessions may be confirm'd to them; all which was granted as desired, by the King, with the advice and assent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in that Parliament, and by Authority of the same.

[Valued at 277 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.]

184 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

St. JOHN BAPTIST at Lynn, in Norfolk.

FOunded by Ulfkatel Son of the Nun of Sceringes, and by him endow'd with a parcel of Land in Linn, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms. The Mayor and Burgesses of Linn did use to present and establish the Master and Warden of this Hospital, till the time of John of Ely Bishop of Norwich.

[Valued at 7 l. 6s. 11d. per Annum.]

St. MARY MAGDALEN at Lenne.

THomas de Cant. and Robert Winchelsey Archbishops of Canterbury, in their Visitations, and Peter the Chaplain, the Founder, made several Orders for the Government of this Hospital; as, that any Brother being a detractor or vexatious to the rest to be punisht by the Prior and Brethren, and if incorrigible to be expell'd; founded with a Church and Coemitary for twelve Brothers and Sisters, some found, and some infirm, with a Chaplain; to dwell in the House, the infirm not to come into the Chancel, Cellar, Kitchin, or Curtelage, nor to intermeddle with the Offices of the House, to have a Common Seal, etc. All the Brothers and Sisters to have equal Portions in the Revenues with the Prior, if any of the Infirm withdraws himself for one month, his Salary for a year to be forfeited, if for a year, he to be expell'd; a general Chapter to be held yearly the next day after the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen, etc. Which Orders were ratified and confirm'd by William de Turbus Bishop of Norwich, Anno Dom. 1174.

KYNEWALDGRAVES, In Yorkshire.

ROger Archbishop of York, and other Archbishops of that See were Benefactors to the poor Sisters of this Hospital dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen, all confirm'd by Thomas Archbishop of York, Anno 1301. Which with many other Possessions by others given were all recited and confirm'd by King Edward the III. Anno 1.

St. MARGARETS, at Huntingdon.

SEems to be founded by Malcolm King of Scotland, who gave to the Infirm of this Hospital, Lands, and Rents, so did Isabel de Brus, Daughter of Earl David; Robert de Brus, Son of the said Lord of Anandale gave them divers Tenements in Cunyngtone, with a view of Frank-pledge to be held there twice per Annum, viz. after Easter, and after Michaelmass, with small Courts to be held there at their Will as oft as expedient. The like Grant by Bernard de Bruys, all which was confirm'd to the Master and Brethren of this House by King Edw. III. Anno 12.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 185

HORNECHIRCHE, in Essex.

THE Master and Confraters of the Hospital of Hornchurch were removable at the Will of the Master of the Hospital of St. Bernard de Monte in Savoy, to which Hospital this was only a Cell, having no Common Seal of their own, nor power to sue or be sued.

HERBALDOUNE, in Kent.

FOunded by King Henry II. who assigned to the Lepers of this Hospital a Rent of twenty marks per Annum out of his Revenue of Canterbury, till such time as he assigns them other Provisions in Churches or Rents elsewhere.

[Valued at 109 l. 7s. 2d. per Annum.]

St. SEPULCHERS at Hedon in Yorkshire.

ALan Son of Oubernus gave a parcel of Land to God and the Lepers of St. Sepulchres at Hedon; Alexander de Thunestal and many others were Benefactors to this Hospital, all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edw. the II. Anno Reg. 19.

HAVERING, in Essex.

KING Henry the II. gave the Church of Havering to the poor Brethren of the Church of St. Bernard de Monte Jovis. Confirm'd to them with other Lands by King Richard the I. and King Henry the III. Anno 37.

ELLESHAM, in Lincolnshire.

THIS Hospital, begun by Beatrix, and finisht and confirm'd by Walter de Amundevil, was by him conferr'd upon Canons Regular, to whom he gave divers Lands and Churches, for the maintenance of Hospitality and Sustentation of poor People. Confirm'd to the Canons by John Son of William de Dyve, Anno Dom. 1277. The abovesaid Walter de Amundevile became a Canon here, and was here buried. The Hospitallers of Jerusalem having by fraud obtained this House from the then Patron, were by Letter from Pope Alexander, made to relinquish their Pretensions.

[Valued at 70 l. 0s. 8d. per Annum.]

186 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

St. MARY's at Dover, in Kent.

FOunded by Hubert de Burgo Earl of Kent. King Henry III. Anno 11, granted to the Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital the Tith of all profits arising from the Passage of the Port of Dover, to hold to them and their Successors in Frankalmoign. The same King, Anno 15. granted them a yearly Rent of 10 l. at the feast of St. Michael to be paid out of the profits of his Port of Dover, beside the tith above mention'd. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 86.

CONYNGESHED, in Lancashire.

WIlliam de Lancaster gave to God and St. Mary and to the Brethren of this Hospital, all Conyngsheved, and divers other Lands, Possessions, and Commons of Pasture, etc. He also gave the Canons of this House the Advowson of the House of Lepers of St. Leonard at Kirkeby in Kendale, etc. Divers other Benefactors gave Many Lands and parcels, all which were recited and confirm'd by King Edward II. Anno 12. Magnus King of Man and the Iles, by his deed dated Anno Dom. 1256. granted to the Prior and Convent of this House that their Ships and Goods should be free from toll, and all other demands and Customs, throughout all his Dominions.

St. JOHN Baptist, at Coventry.

LAurence Prior of Coventry, and the Convent there granted the Scite of this House and the apurtenances, in perpetual Alms for the Receit of Poor and infirm people. And this was at the petition of Edmund Archdeacon of Coventry. Confirm'd by Richard Archbishop of Canterbury and by Bull of Pope Honorius III., dated, Anno 1221. King Henry III. Anno 45. granted to the Brethren and Sisters of this Hospital liberty and protection by themselves or Messengers to ask, gather, and receive Almes abroad, for Releif of their House, for the space of seven years. Anno Dom. 1425. Richard Crosby being then Prior of the Cathedral and Regular Church of the Blessed Mary of Coventry, and Thomas Everden Master or Custos of this Hospital; Several Orders were made for the Government of this House, containing, That the Prior and Convent aforesaid shall be accounted Founders of this Hospital, and Edmund formerly Archdeacon of Coventry Principal Benefactor, that the Master of the Hospital be Subject to the Prior, who is to have the placing, Creation, and reception of the said Master and all the Brethren and Sisters, that the said Prior and his Successors may Visit in the said Hospital once a year, attended with eight persons only, the Master to make Oath of Fidelity to the Prior at his admission, the Brothers and Sisters a Promise in Writing sign'd and Seal'd. The Master to be in Priests Orders, the Habit of the Master and Brothers to be of Dark Colour sign'd with a black Crosse, and on their Mantles also a black Crosse; without which habit they ought not to appear abroad. The Master to hold Chapter every Fryday, or however once a week, The Divine Offices to be devoutly celebrated in the said Hospital at the usual hours Secundum usum sarum, The Lay Brothers and Sisters that are illerate to say

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 187

instead of Matins thirty Paters, and as many Aves, with the Creed, and for every of the other hours seven, But those Brothers that have learning, sufficient, to say the Office of the Blessed Virgin; The Sisters to be always intent and Solicitous about the Care and Service of the Infirm in the said Hospital. The Common Seal to be kept under three Keys, one to remain with the Master, the other two with the Senior Brother and Sister, That the Master shall pay predial Tithes to the Prior, but not of Cattle nor Wood, That the said Hospital shall have a free Sepulture for those who choose to be buried with them, etc.

[Valued at 83 l. 3s. 3d. per Annum.]

BRUGWALTER, in Somersetshire.

FOunded by William Briewerr, for thirteen poor People, beside Religious men, and Travailers. Several Churches being of the Advowson of the Master and Brethren of this Hospital of St. John Baptist at Brudgwalter, were appropriated hereunto by the Bishop of Bath and Wells and the Bishop of Exeter, Anno 1284. The Patronage of this Hospital coming to the hands of the Lord de la Zouche in Custody of King Henry VI. by reason of his Nonage, that King granted his License to the President and Brethren of this House to elect a New Master, on the death of the former.

[Valued at 120 l. 19s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

BRUGENORTH, in Shropshire.

IT was found by Inquisition, 14 Edward IV. that Radulf le Strange Founded and endow'd this Hospital in honour of the blessed Virgin, and St. John Baptist; From which Ralf le Strange did lineally descend John Talbot, created first Earl Salisbury of that name. And it was then further found that the name of Custos of this Hospital was in Process of time changed to that of Prior.

[Valued at 4 l. per Annum.]

St. JOHN'S in the City of Wells.

FIrst Founded by Hugh Bishop of Lincoln. Joselin Bishop of Bath, and Sir Edmund Lyons were Benefactors. These were so bountiful to this Hospital, that at first this House had two hundred marks of annual Rents.

[Valued at 40 l. 0s. 2d. ob per Annum.]

STRODE, in Kent.

FOunded by Gilbert Bishop of Rochester, for the Receit of Poor, Weak and infirm People, as well known, as Strangers, and Travellers, and for their releif with Bed, Meat, and Drink, till they either die or depart in health; The Master or Governour of which House by the name and title

188 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

of Iconomus, he appointed to be a Regular, and to have with him at least two Priests to celebrate daily two Masses. The said Bishop endow'd this Hospital with divers Churches and Tithes etc. All which Revenues were confirm'd by the Prior and Convent of Rochester, Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, and King Richard the first. Whole Several Deeds were all Recited and confirm'd by King Edward III. Anno 6. by Inspeximus. The same King Edward III. Anno 16. granted his License to Mary of St. Paul Countess of Pembroke to grant her Mannour of Strode to any House of Religious Men or Women, already built, or to be built by her, with a Non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

[Valued at 52 l. 9s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

SHIREBURNE, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

FOunded and endow'd with Lands and Churches by Hugh de Puteaco (or Pudsey) who placed there Leperous People collected all over his Diocess, endowing it with Lands and Churches.

SUTTON, in Yorkshire.

JEffrey Fitz-Peter Earl of Essex gave certain Lands here to William de Wrotham Archdeacon of Tanton, for the erection of an Hospital in honour of the holy and individual Trinity, and the blessed Virgin, and of all Celestial Virtues, and all Saints, and for the maintenance of thirteen poor People and three Chaplains.

MERLEBERGE, in Wiltshire.

TO this Hospital dedicated to St. John Baptist, and to the Brothers and Sisters here. King John, Anno 16. confirm'd divers Lands given by Henry de Kenet, Levenot Son of Levenot, and others.

[Valued at 6 l. 18s. 4d. per Annum.]

St. LAURENCE near Bristol, in Somersetshire.

KING John, Anno Reg. 9. and King Henry the III. Anno 31. confirmed divers Lands to the Masters and Brethren of this Hospital of Lepers of St. Lawrence in the Suburbs of Bristol.

BOCKLAND, in Somersetshire.

LOretta Countess of Leicester, Widow of Earl Robert, gave divers Lands to God and the blessed Mary, and St. John Baptist, and to the blessed Poor of the Hospital-house of Jerusalem, for the Sustentation of the Sisters of Bocklaund, and for the finding of a Chaplain to celebrate daily in the Church at Bokland.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 189

St. THOMAS, in Southwark.

FOunded by Peter de Rupibus, and endowed with a Rent of 343 l. Gilbert de Clare Earl of Gloucester and Hertford, Anno 7. E. 1. exchanged with the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of St. Thomas the Martyr in Southwark, the Church of Blechyngelegh for certain Lands in Surrey; which Church King Edward the II. gave them License to impropriate to their Hospital, and to hold it to them and their Successors, so impropriated.

[Valued at 266 l. 17s. 11 d. per Annum.]

DOMUS DEI, in Southampton.

GErvase de Hamton, Margaret de Redvariis, and many others gave divers Lands, etc., to this Hospital, all whose Gifts were recited and confirm'd by King Edward the III. Anno Reg. 6. The same King, Anno 17. gave the Custody of this Hospital, then being of his Patronage, to the Prepositus and Scholars of Queens-hall in Oxford, and to their Successors for ever, which Hall was then newly founded and endow'd with Possessions by Queen Philipa Wife of that King. He also granted to the Custos, Scholars, Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital, to be freed for themselves and Lands from all Taxes and Tallages, etc., for ever. King Edward the IV. Anno 1. granted to the Custos, Chaplain, and Brethren of this Hospital, and their Successors, the Alien Priory of Shirburne in the County of Southampton, with all its Lands, etc. Richard Duke of York the Father, and Richard Earl of Cambridge the Grandfather of that King, are in the said Grant alledged to be buried in this Hospital.

SANDONE, in Surrey.

TO the Master and Brethren of this Hospital dedicated to the Holy Ghost, William de Perci Son and Heir of Henry de Perci gave and confirm'd divers Lands and Rents for the Maintenance of six Chaplains. The Heart of which William being buried here, the Prior and Brethren of this House oblig'd themselves to find a Lamp and Wax-Candle to burn for him in the Church of Standone at the time of Mass, for ever, Anno 14. Henry 6. That King granted his License to the Cardinal Bishop of Winchester to annex and unite for ever this Hospital, being founded by his Predecessors, to that of St. Thomas in Southwark.

ROUNCEVAL, by Charing-Cross in the Suburbs of London.

IT was found by Inquisition 7. R.2. that William Marechall Earl of Pembroke gave to the Prior and Convent of the Hospital of the blessed Mary of Rouncyvall and his Successors forever, one Messuage and certain Lands and Tenements in Charing, where the Chappel and Hospital are situated. Confirmed by King Henry.

190 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

St. JOHN's Hospital at Oxford.

KING Henry the III. in the seventeenth year of his Reign, erected a noble Inn, or Hospital, not far from the East gate, in Oxford, for the Reception and Relief of the Necessities of the Infirm and Travellers, himself laying the first Stone. The same King gave the Master and Brethren of this Hospital his Mill at Edendon, and the Jews Garden in the Suburbs of Oxford without the said East-gate, and granted that as often as he came to Oxford they should receive of him Alms for one hundred poor People on the first day of his coming to Town. He also granted to this Hospital of St. John Baptist at Oxford a parcel of his Wood of Shottoure, with the Pasture adjoyning, etc.

NEWSTEDE near Stamford, in Lincolnshire.

WIlliam de Albiniaco the III. gave to this Hospital, founded in honour of the blessed Mary ever Virgin, at the Bridge of Wass between Stamford and Offington, and to the Brethren there, divers Lands, etc. With the Tith of all the Bread, Flesh, and Fish, spent in his Family, and free Pasture for one hundred sheep, etc. The Master of the said Hospital to be a Priest and a Canon Regular of some House, and to have with him some other Canons living according to the Rule of St. Augustin, and seven poor and infirm men to be maintain'd in the Hospital. The same William, the Founder of this House, by another Deed appointed the number of the Brothers here to be as follows, two Priests, one Deacon, one Clerk, and thirteen infirm People. William Albiniaco the IV. confirm'd what his Father had given, and granted that upon death of the Prior, the Canons here might freely choose another and present him to the Patron, and in the mean time, the Canons to have the Custody of the House, and Liberties of the same. All which things were confirm'd by' King Edward the III. Anno Reg. 11.

[Valued at 37 l. 6s. per Annum.]

St. JOHN BAPTIST, at Nottingham.

ANno Dom. 1241. Walter de Gray Archbisop of York made the following Order and Rule for the Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital. That the Master or Custos provide two Chaplains or more to celebrate there for ever, that all the Brethren rise together to Matines, which are to be so early that they maybe finisht by or before day break, from the Feast of St. Michael to Easter; which done then shall follow Prime and Terce, then Mass, and after Mass, Sext and None; the Brothers shall mind their business in the House, and if not hindred with necessary Occasions, they shall hear Vespers and Complin; that they shall be all obedient to the Custos, and none shall have any thing in property for seven days under pain of Excommunication; they shall be all cloathed and fed in common, eat no flesh but three days in the Week, Sunday, Tuesday, and Thursday; lie in one Dormitory; they shall be chast and sober; their Habit of Russet and Black, etc.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 191

Here was in this Town of Nottingham, another Hospital, founded by John Plumtre, by License of King Richard the II. Anno Reg. 16. for two Chaplains, one of which to be Master or Custos, and for thirteen old and poor Widows (fenio confractis & paupertate depressis) which said John en'dow'd the same with ten Messuages and two Tofts in Nottingham, and ordained that the Community of the Town of Nottingham, and the Prior of Lenton should present to the Chantry in the Chappel of this Hospital, and that the two Chantry Priests should receive for their stipends 100s. to each yearly. Whose Orders bear date Anno Dom. 1400.

St. JOHN BAPTIST at Ludlow, in Shropshire.

FOunded by Peter Undergod, near the Bridge at Ludlow, and by him endow'd with divers Lands, etc., for the maintenance of certain Religious Brethren, and for the Sustenance of poor and infirm People. He also granted to the Brothers, that after his decease, they might freely choose one of themselves to be their Master or Custos: and so as often as occasion should be, and the Master and Brothers to admit the Poor, etc. which Lands, etc., so given as abovesaid were confirm'd by Walter de Lacy the Chief Lord of the Fee, and by King Henry the III. Anno 5.

[Valued at 17 l. 3s. 3d. per Annum.]

The House of Converts, in the Suburbs of London.

FOunded by King Henry the III. in a place then called Newstrete, and by him endow'd with seven hundred Marks for the Maintenance of Converts, and for the building their Church, etc., to be paid yearly out of the Exchequer, one Moiety at Easter and the other at Michaelmas, till other Provision shall be made, in Lands or Rents. And by another Charter dated 33. H. 3. that King gave to this House by him founded for Convert Jews, between the old and new Temple at London, certain Escheated Lands to hold to the Master and Brethren of the said House converted and to be converted from Judaism to the Catholick Faith.

LECHELADE, in Gloucestershire.

FOunded by Richard Earl of Cornwal Brother of King Henry III. and Senchia his Wife. Confirm'd by King Henry III. Which King Anno 54. granted to the Brethren of this Hospital, dedicated to St. John Baptist, the Hermitage of Lovebury in the Forrest of Whichewode, they providing one Chaplain to celebrate daily in the said Hermitage. King Edward the IV. Anno 12. granted the Patronage or Advowson of this Hospital to his Mother Cecily Dutchess of York, with License to change it into a Chantry of three perpetual Chaplains to celebrate the Divine Offices daily at the Altar of our Lady in the Church of Lechlade, which three Chaplains to be a Body incorporate, able to purchase Lands etc., and to have a Common Seal. By the same Deed he granted License to John Twynyho to found another Chantry at the Altar of

192 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

St. Blase in the same Church for one perpetual Chaplain, and that the other three Chaplains may grant to this Chantry Priest of St. Blase, a yearly Rent of ten Marks.

LEDBURY, in Herefordshire.

FOunded by Hugh Foliot Bishop of Hereford for the Reception of poor People and Travellers, and dedicated in honour of God and St. Katherine the Virgin; he endow'd it with several Churches, and Tenements, etc., all which with other Lands given by others, King Edw. the III. Anno 2. confirm'd.

[Valued at 22 l. 5s. per Annum.]

St. LEONARDS, at Leicester.

Robert the III. call'd for distinction Blancmains, Earl of Leicester, had issue, among others, William a Leper, who founded this Hospital.

LANGRIGH, in ... [Lancashire]

Richard de Singelton, and Walter Nutun of Ribelcester gave to the Master and Brethren of this Hospital, dedicated to God and St. Saviour, Divers Lands in Ribelcester and elsewhere.

BILLESWIKE near Bristol, in Gloucestershire.

FOunded by Robert de Gurnay, and by him endow'd with the Mannor of Poulet, etc., for the Maintenance of a Master and three Chaplains, and for the refection of one hundred poor People daily, for ever, each of the said Poor to have a quantity of Bread of the weight of 45s. with a sufficient quantity of Potage made of Oat-meal: the Bread to be made of an equal mixture of Bean-flower and Barly (de frumento fabarum, & ordeo).

[Valued at 112 l. 9s. 9d. per Annum.]

GLANFORDBRIGGE, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by the Ancestors of Sir Ralph Paynel Knt. but the Abbot and Convent of Seleby had the power of placing one of their Brotherhood, in this Hospital, to have the Custody of the same, yet so that he should not convert the Goods of the Hospital to any other use but only to the Sustentation of the Poor and Needy.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 193

St. BARTLEMEW's, in Gloucester.

IT was found by Inquisition 30. E. 3. That in the time of Henry the II. one Nicholas Walred, a Chaplain, undertook the building of the West-Bridge here, to whom many Workmen resorting, one William Myparty a Burgess of Gloucester, erected a certain Habitation for the said Nicholas and the other Workmen, in which House for a long time after the said Nicholas and William did dwell together, with the Workmen and divers infirm People of both Sexes, having always a Priest for their Governor all living on Alms, till King Henry the III. Anno 13. gave them the Church of St. Nicholas in this City, with other Lands, from which time the said House became an Hospital bearing the name of St. Bartlemew, the same King granted them Liberty also to choose a Prior, which accordingly they did. This Hospital consisted of a Master, and three Brothers, beside the Poor.

[Valued at 44 l. 7s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

GRETHAM, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

FOunded by Robert Bishop of Durham in honour of God, St. Mary, and St. Cuthbert, for a Master and Brethren, and for the Sustentation of the poor and needy People that should resort thither; who also endow'd it with the Mannor of Gretham, etc. He granted also that the Master and Brethren of this House should be free from all Tolls, Aids, and Tallages; and to all their Benefactors, being contrite and confess'd, he releas'd forty days Penance. Whose Deed, confirm'd by Hugh Prior of Durhum and the Convent there, bears date Anno Dom. 1262.

[Valued at 97 l. 6s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

ESTBRIGGE, in Canterbury.

THIS Hospital founded in honour of St. Nicholas, St. Catherine, and St. Thomas the Martyr, was compounded of several, united into one; the poor and infirm Brethren of which, William Cokyn Citizen of Canterbury made his Heirs of all his Lands, Possessions, and Chattles, which with divers other Gifts from other Men, King Edward the II. Anno 7. recited and confirm'd to the Master and Brethren here, and their Successors.

[Valued at 23 l. 18s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

BOLTON, in Northumberland.

FOunded and endow'd by Robert de Roos for three Brothers and Chaplains, and thirteen Leperous Men, and certain Lay Brothers. Constituting the Abbot of Rivall, and the Prior of Kyrkham joyntly to be the principal Wardens or Governors of this Hospital to whose Power, he committed the placing the Master, or displacing him if occasion etc.

194 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

BASINGSTOKE, in Southamptonshire.

FOunded by King Henry the III. ad sustentation ministerorum Altaris Christi, For the support of those who serve at God's Altar.

St. KATHERINES near the Tower, at London.

FOunded by Queen Alianore Widow of King Henry II. For a Master and Brethren, and by her largely endow'd with Lands, Rents,and Tenements in East-Smithfield, Kent, and Hertfordshire. Reserving to her self and the succeeding Queens of England full Power to place the Master or Custos of the Hospital, for ever. Ordaining that out of the Revenues of this House should be maintain'd three Priests together with the said Master, to celebrate daily in the said Hospital; that on the 16th of November on which day King Henry the II. died, a half-penny a peice should be distributed in Alms to one thousand poor People, and on every day in the year 12d. to twenty four poor People, that upon the death of any Brother or Sister, another to be substituted by her, or the succeeding Queens of England, who are after her death, to be the Patronesses and Conservators of this House, Whose Deed of Foundation and Settlement, bears date Anno Dom. 1273.

[Valued at 315 l. 14s. 2d. per Annum.]

St. JOHN BAPTIST, in Exeter.

FOunded by Gilbert and John, Merchants of Exeter, here were five Priests, nine Boys, and twelve poor People.

St. PAUL at Norwich.

FOunded by Edward (or Eborard) the II. Bishop of Norwich. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 43.

St GILES at Norwich.

FOunded by Walter Suffeld, alias Calthorpe, Bishop of Norwich, for a Master, three Priests, and twelve poor Women.

[Valued at 90 l. 12s. per Annum.]

WELLE, in ... (Yorkshire)

FOunded by Ralph Neville for three Chaplains, and certain poor and infirm People, and by him endow'd with divers Lands which he held of the honour of Richmond, for which he had the License of King Edward the III. Anno 16. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 89.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 195

PONTFRACT, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by William le Tabourere, for one Chaplain and eight poor People, and endow'd by him and others, with the License of King Edward the III. granted Anno. 8.

ELSING-SPITTEL, in London.

WIlliam Elsyng Citizen of London founded here a Colledge consisting of one Warden and four Secular Priests, and an Hospital of poor People in the Parishes of St. Alphege, and St. Mary Aldermanbury, on which Colledge and Hospital he bestow'd certain Tenements and Rents in the said Parishes and elsewhere in London, and gave the Patronage of the same to the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's who united to this House, and appropriated the Church of Aldermanbury, etc. The said Dean and Chapter to place the Warden and two of the Priests, and the said William Elsyng, the other two; the Custos to be in Priestly orders, and unbenificed elsewhere; so also the four Priests. Other Rules and Orders were made for the Government of this House, as that the Custos or Warden shall at his admittance be sworn to the due Administration of his Office; that the Warden and Priests shall daily say Mattins, Masses, and the Hours, Vespers and Complin in the Chappel of the Hospital, and visit the infirm People there; that within three days after the Nativity of the blessed Virgin yearly the four Priests and Warden be new cloathed, in like manner, the four Priests Apparel not exceeding 30s. for each, and the Warden in a Garment of the same colour not exceeding 40s. and that the Priests be allowed more for Linnen and Shooes, etc. 20s. per Annum to each, and the Warden 40s. to be paid yearly, eight days after Easter; that ninety eight blind and poor People of both Sexes be received and lodged in this hospital, and Poor, Blind, or paralitick Priests, it any such offer themselves, to be received before any others, etc. Which orders were seal'd by the said William Elsyng, Anno Dom 1331. (5. E. 3.) in the presence of John de Polteney then Mayor of London, the two Sheriffs, and several Alderman, etc. Not long after this, viz., Anno 1340. Ralph Bishop of London changed the Warden and Secular Priests of this Hospital of St. Mary within Cripplegate, into a Prior and Canons Regular of St. Augustin, under the Patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Paul's, still; all other things concerning the said Hospital relating to the poor, etc. to remain as before; and this Commutation was upon the Petition of the Founder William Elsyng.

[Valued at 193 l. 15s. 5d. per Annum.]

BERKING-CHIRCHE, near the Tower at London.

KING Edward the III. Anno 44. granted his License to Robert Denton Chaplain, to found an Hospital in his House or Messuage within the Parish of Berking-Church, London, for the Habitation of poor Priests and other poor men and Women, who fall into Frensies and lose their Memory; he also Licensed him to give and assign the same House and another Messuage in the Parish of St. Laurence Pounteney (both which Messuages

196 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

were held of him in Burgage) to certain Chaplains, etc. for the celebrating the Divine Offices, etc. But the intended Foundation here not taking effect King Rich. the II. Anno 2. at the Petition of the said Robert, granted him License to assign the Premisses, etc. to the Hospital of St. Katherine near the Tower.

St. MARY's in Leicester.

FOunded by Henry Duke of Lancaster near the Castle in Leicester, Anno Dom. 1330. And by him endow'd with divers Lands, etc. Here was also of his Erection a Collegiate Church, in which he was buried Anno 1361. The whole was to maintain a Dean and twelve Canons, and as many Vicars, one hundred poor People and ten able Women to serve them. Vid. Vol. 3. part 2. p. 139.

[Valued at 23 l. 12s. 11d. per Annum.]

HETHE, in Kent.

KING Edward the III. Anno 16. granted his License to Hamon Bishop of Rochester for the founding of this Hospital for thirteen poor People, with a non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

HOLBECHE, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded with License of King Edward the III. by John de Kirktone for a Warden being a Chaplain, and fifteen poor People. Dedicated in honour of all Saints, and by the said John endowed with divers Lands, held of the Abbot and Convent of Croyland.

St. NICHOLAS near York.

THis Hospital being of the Advowson or Patronage of the King of England, was Anno 1303. Visited by William de Grenefeud at that time Lord Chancellor, at which time he made certain Orders for the Government of this House, viz., that all the Brothers and Sisters of this Hospital should at their Admittance profess due Obedience to the Master and Warden, and inviolaby observe perpetual Chastity, That both Brothers and Sisters should be present at Matins, Mass, and the other hours, unless hinder'd by Sickness, etc. and that they should say during the time of Divine Service, the Lord's Prayer and Angelick Salutation, with due devotion, iterating the same as often as the Lord shall inspire them; That the Brothers and Sisters should not live under the same Roof, etc. That what ever they have for their several uses shall after their death come to the House; That they shall have a Common Seal; that they shall not demise, or bind any of their Possessions, unknown to the Chancellor of England or his Successors; That for the future none shall be Master or Custos of this House but such only as will undertake the Government in his own person;

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 197

If any transgress against their due obedience the Master or Custos shall for the first Offence punish the Offenders by with-holding their Commons for some days, as the offence requires, which punishment shall for the second offence be doubled, for the third the party shall be expell'd etc.

[Valued at 29 l. 1s. 4d. per Annum.]

BOWES, in the Isle of Gerneseye.

Founded with License of King Edward III. Anno 35. by Peter of St. Peters in Gernsey, in the Parish of Saintpierport in that Iland, for a Master or Custos, Brethren, and Sisters; and by him endow'd with twenty yardland, and the delivery of fourscore quarters of wheat yearly, arising out of certain Land in the said Parish; which Land was held in Capite of the King, by a Service call'd Chaumpert, viz., the payment of the eleventh Sheaf arising on the said Lands yearly.

WOLVERHAMPTON, in Staffordshire.

FOunded, with License of King Richard II. Anno 16. by Clement Lusone, and William Watersall, for one Chaplain and six poor people.

The Holy Trinity in New Sarum.

KIng Richard II. Anno 17. granted his License to John Chaundeler to make an Hospital in honour of the holy Trinity of two messuages in a Street call'd Newestreet in New Sarum, for the Releif of poor weak and Infirm people, whereof the Mayor of the Said City for the time being to be Master, and to rule and govern the same, and to endow the same with a certain Rent of 13s. 4d. King Henry IV. Anno 1. granted License to the then Master to purchase Lands of 20 l. value per Annum.

KNOLS Alms house at Pontfract, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Sir Robert Knolls Knight Citizen of London, and Constance his Wife, in honour of the Holy Trinity, and blessed Virgin Mary, for certain Chaplains whereof one to be Master, two Clerks, and thirteen Poor people, such especially as by misfortune come to want, and two Servants to help the said Poor. The Master to have twenty marks for his sustenance, the two Clerks each ten marks, and the thirteen Poor amongst them 34 l. 4s. 3d. ob. per Annum, viz, 1d. ob. a day to each. Which Deed of the Said Roberts Foundation bears date Anno Dom. 1385.

[Valued at 182 l. 14s. 4d. per Annum.]

198 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

OKEHAM, in Rutland.

KIng Richard II. Anno 21. granted his Licence to William Dalby of Extone to found this Hospital for two Chaplains, of which one to be Custos, and thirteen poor Men, and to endow the same with one Messuage and two acres of Land at Okeham, and to grant the Patronage of the same to the Prior and Convent of St. Anne of the Order of Carthusians at Coventry, with a further License to the said Prior and Convent to give a yearly Rent of 40 l. to be issuing out of some of their Possessions where ever they pleased to assign, to the Custos of the said Hospital and the said Poor men for their maintenance, for ever.

[Valued at 12 l. 12s. 11d. per Annum.]

DONYNGTON, in Barkshire.

KIng Richard II. Anno 16. gave License to Richard Abberbury to found an Hospital in his Mannor of Donyngton, which he held of the King, as of his honour of Walingford, for certain poor people, of which one to be chief, by the name and Title of The Minister of God of the poor House of Donyngton, and to endow the same with divers Lands.

[Valued at 19 l. 3s. 10d. per Annum.]

THORNTONS Hospital in New Castle upon Tine, in Northumberland.

FOunded by Roger Thornton in honour of St. Catherine for one Chaplain, who is Custos, nine poor men, and four Poor Women, to be continually resident, for which foundation King Henry IV. Anno 13. granted his License, and that they might have a Common Seal. Endow'd by the said Roger with yearly Rents of 10 l.

EWELME, in Oxfordshire.

KIng Henry VI, Anno 15. granted his License to his Cousin William de la Pole Earl of Suffolk, and Alice his Wife to found an Alms House in this Town, for two Chaplains and thirteen poor men, and that they should be a Body Corporate, and that he might endow the same with one hundred Marks per Annum. This Hospital was Founded Anno Dom. 1448. and call'd Gods House. The two Priests were one to instruct the Poor in Religious Dutyes, the other to be a Schoolmaster and teach the poor; both to have for Salery 10 1, the Minister 16d. a. week, the other twelve poor men, 13d. a week.

[Valued at 20 i per Annum.]

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 199

SHIREBURNE, in Dorsetshire.

FOunded, with License of King Henry the VI. Anno 15. by Robert Nevyle Bishop of Sarum, Humfrey Stafford, Knt. Margaret Goghe, John Fauntleroy, and John Baret, to the honour of God, St. John Baptist, and St. John Evangelist, for twenty Brethren, twelve poor and impotent men, and four poor and impotent Women, and for a perpetual Chaplain; and that the Brothers of this House might elect one among themselves to be their Master from year to year, and upon the death of any of their number the rest might elect others to succeed in their room, etc.

BOCKING, in Essex.

KING Henry the IV. granted his License to John Doreward to erect a perpetual Chantry of one Chaplain in the Parish Church of Stanewey in Essex, and to endow the same with a Mansion lying near the Church yard there, and with 7 l. of yearly Rent. Which Licensed Foundation not being effected in the Life of the said John, King Henry the VI. did afterward grant License to John Doreward Esq., his Son, to found a certain House at Bocking to be called Maison Dieu, for seven poor People, one of which to be call'd Praepositus Villae de Bokking, and to have the Government of the said poor, etc., and to endow the same, and a Chantry by him founded in the Parish Church of Bokking, with Lands and Rents.

TODINGTON, in Bedfordshire.

KING Henry the VI. Anno, 21. granted his License that John Broughton or his Feoffees might erect an Hospital in honour of St. John Baptist in Todyngdone, for one Chaplain, and three poor Men, to be a perpetual Community and Body Corporate. Also that he might give to the Prioress and Nuns of St. Margaret at Dertford an Annual Rent of 8 l. and that the said Nuns might assign the said Rent, and also another Rent of 5 l. per Annum to be issuing out of their own Lands to this Hospital, which House of Dertford was of the said Kings Patronage being founded by his Progenitors.

RICHMOND, in Yorkshire.

HERE being of old time a poor Hospital dedicated to St. Nicholas in which was only one Chaplain, of the Kings Patronage by reason of the honour of Richmond, and that Hospital being fallen to extream decay, William Ayscogh one of the Justices of the Common-Pleas, repair'd it, and added another Chantry Chaplain, in consideration whereof, and that he was become as a second Founder, King Henry the VI. Anno 26. granted him the Patronage.

[Valued at 10 l. per Annum.]

200 HOSPITALS. VOL. II.

DEPTFORD, in Kent.

KING Henry the VI. Anno 31. gave License to John Bamburgh, William Rothele, Roger Jonet, and Thomas Boost, and to the Survivors of them to found an Alms House in honour of the holy Trinity (to which the Parish Church there is dedicated) for the perpetual Vicar of that Church, and the Gardians of the Goods, and Chattles of the said Church, and for five poor decrepid Men; and that the said Vicar, and Gardians, and their Successors should be Master of the said House, and a Body Corporate, and have a Common Seal. With License to give and assign Lands and Rents to the said Hospital of the value of 20 l. per Annum.

The Alms-house within the Precinct of St. Crosses at Winchester, in Hampshire.

FOunded by Henry, Cardinal, and Bishop of Winchester, half Brother of King Henry IV. who by License of King Henry the VI. Anno 21. granted to the Master and Brethren of the Hospital of the Holy Cross near Winchester, divers Mannors, and Lands, etc., to the yearly value of 500 l. Within which this Alms-house was erected for two Chaplains, five and thirty poor Men, and three Women, to be govern'd by the Master of that Hospital; but the Cardinal dying before this Foundation was perfectly compleated, King Henry the VI. Anno 33. did incorporate them under a Rector of their own, by the name of The New Alms-house of Noble Poverty, establisht near Winchester by Henry Cardinal of England, and Bishop of Winchester, Son of John late Duke of Lancaster of noble Memory; with grant of a Common Seal, and Power to purchase, etc.

[Valued at 84 l. 4s. 2d. per Annum.]

STOKFASTON (Stockerson) in Leicestershire.

FOunded with License of King Edward the IV. Anno 5. by John de Boyville Esq., near the Town Church, for one Chaplain, and three poor men, who were a Body Corporate, and might retain Lands to the value of 10 l. per Annum.

HEITSBURY, in Wiltshire.

FOunded with License of King Edward the IV. Anno 11. by Margaret Widow of Robert Lord Hungerford, John Cheyne of Pynne Esq., and John Mervyn Esq., for one Chaplain, twelve poor Men, and one poor Woman, of whom the Chaplain to be Custos or Warden. Which Hospital was made a Body Corporate, etc., and endow'd with divers Lands, and had a grant of twenty Load of Wood for firing, out of the Wood of Southleghe in Wiltshire.

VOL. II. HOSPITALS. 201

The Savoy, in the Suburbs of London.

KING Henry the VIII. Anno 2. granted the place, or peice of Ground, called the Savoy, parcel of the Dutchy of Lancaster, and lying in the Parishes of St. Clements Danes without the Bars of the New Temple at London, and St. Mary of the Stronde in the County of Middlesex, to Richard Bishop of Winchester, Richard Bishop of London, Thomas Bishop of Durham, Edmund Bishop of Sarum, William Bishop of Lincoln, John Bishop of Rochester, Thomas Earl of Arundel, Thomas Earl of Surrey, Charles Lord Herbert, Sir John Fyneux Chief Justice of the Kings-Bench, Sir Robert Rede Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, John Young Master of the Roles, Sir John Lovell, and John Cutte, Executors of King Henry the VII. for the founding and establishing of an Hospital. And by another Deed dated Anno 4. he granted License to the said Executors to found such Hospital for five Secular Chaplains, one of which to be Master, to pray for the good Estate of him and Catherine his Consort, and for the Souls of King Henry the VII. and Elizabeth his Consort, and of Arthur Prince of Wales. Which Hospital was to be called The Hospital of Henry the VII. late King of England, at the Savoy; to be a Body Corporate, to have a Common Seal, and yearly Revenues, to the value of five hundred Marks per Annum, for maintenance of the said Chaplains, and for performance of such other Works of Mercy and Piety as by the said Executors shall be appointed and exprest. With a Non obstante to the Statute of Mortmain.

[Valued at 529 l. 5s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

202 KNIGHTS VOL. II.

Of the Knights, Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem.

THE Patron of this Order of Knights was St. John Baptist from whom they took their Denomination. The Hospital of St. John Baptist and the Poor at Jerusalem, is said to be first but in the time of Julius Caesar Emperor of Rome, and Antiochus Prince of Antioch, with certain Treasure which one Melchiar, a Priest in the Temple, had taken out of the Sepulcher of David; here the Poor and Infirm were kindly received and entertain'd from all parts of the World. The same Author delivers that when our Saviour Christ became incarnate and conversed on Earth, when he came to Jerusalem, he resorted frequently to this House, and that it was in this House that he appear'd to his Apostles after his Passion and Resurrection, the Doors being all shut. After his Ascension, St. Steven and others of his Disciples served the poor in this Hospital house according to our Lord's Precept. When the Christians were expell'd from Jerusalem, and the City was possest by the Saracens, one Conrardus, or Gerardus, a devout Servant of God, lived here and served the Poor in like manner, who at such time as Jerusalem was besieg'd by Godfrey of Bullen, and the Christian Pilgrims, and a great Famine being in the Christian Camp, was accustomed to go upon the Walls and throw over Loaves, which he carried secretly about him for that purpose, as if he were eager in throwing Stones against the Besiegers. This Gerard was the first Master of this Hospital, which after the City was taken by the Christians was very much favour'd, and its Revenues augmented by the Kings of Jerusalem, etc. After the death of this Gerard, Frier Raymund de Puy became Master, who establisht a Rule for the Hospitallers, confirm'd by Pope Innocent the II. and Pope Boniface. This Rule consists of nine and twenty Articles, among which it is ordain'd that every Brother or Frier, at his admission to the Service of the Poor here, is to profess these three things. Chastity, Obedience, and to live without Property, that when the Friers go abroad they shall not go alone, but two or three together, that if any be publickly guilty of Fornication, he shall be publickly whipt, and then expell'd the Society. The Infirm at their first Reception into the Hospital, shall be confest, and communicate, and then carried to bed, and there served and attended as Lords and Masters of the House, That all the Brothers shall wear a Cross on their upper Garments as a Badge of their Faith, etc.

Others give another account of the Original of the Hospitallers, affirming that after the Turks of Arabia had overrun Syria and Egypt about the year 612. certain Italian Merchants of the City of Malfe, trading into these parts, and being favour'd by the Turks on the account of their Trade, they obtain'd from the Calife of Egypt a peice of Ground lying before the Temple of the Sepulcher for their Habitation; here those Merchants built a Monastery and Church in honour of the blessed Virgin, placing therein an Abbot and Monks: After that they built another little

Vor. II. of St. JOHN, etc. 203

Church in honour of St. Mary Magdalen, for the Reception of Women Pilgrims, and placed therein certain Nuns, and lastly considering the danger of those who came in Pilgrimage to the holy places, who were often robbed by the Turks, they built an Hospital or Domus Dei for the Reception of Men, whether Well or Sick, who arrived here in Pilgrimage, and another Church for them, dedicated to St John Elemon, Patriarch of Alexandria. These three Houses subsisted only by Alms, collected for them, yearly, by the said Merchants of Malfy, till the Christians conquer'd Jerusalem and expelled the Saracens: At which time lived in the Abby of Monks, the before- mentioned Girald to whom the Abbot committed the Reception and Relief of the Poor and Pilgrims in the foresaid Domus Dei or Hospital; and after such reduction of the City, the said Hospital flourisht daily more and more, procuring to it self great Revenues, and to be discharged from its subjection not only to the Abbot, but Patriarch also. These and the like mighty Priviledges granted them by the Court of Rome were the occasion of great Troubles and Disorders between the Hospitallers and the Patriarch of Jerusalem. These Hospitallers on their admission were to make Oath upon the Missal as follows, You promise and vow to God, our Lady, and my Lord, St. John Baptist, to live and die under the obedience of such Superior, whoever he be, as God shall give you, you vow further and promise to live chastly until death, and also without property; we also make another promise, which no Religious Men besides us, make, for we promise to he Servants and Slaves of the Infirm our Masters. After the making this Vow, he who admits him says, And we promise you Bread and Water, and humble Clothing, for nothing more you can require, and we make you a Partaker of all the good Works done in our Order, etc.

A List of such who have been Masters.

1. Girardus.
2. Raymundus de Podio.
3. Augier de Ballen.
4. Arnaudus de Comps.
5. Gilbertus Assailli.
6. Castus.
7. Jobertus.
8. Gaufridus de Dinfono.
9. Hermengandus Daps, in his time the Christians lost Jerusalem.
10. Rogerius de Molins.
11. Garnerius de Neapoli, he had been Prior of St. Johns at London. Vid. p. 550.
12. Alfonsus de Portugalia, resigned.
13. Gaufridus Rat.
14. Garinus de Monteacuto.
15. Bertrandus de Gexi.
16. Garinus.
17. Bertrandus de Cons.
18. Petrus de Villa Brida.
19. Willielmus Castello Novo.
20. Hugo Ryvell.
21. Nicholaus de Lorgne.
22. Odde.
23. Guillelmus de Villareto.
24. Fulco de Vilareto, in his time the Knights Hospitallers took the Island of Rhodes, and removed the Convent from Cyprus. He was deposed.
25. Mauricius de Paygnaco.
26. Elionnus de Villa Nova.
27. Deodatus de Gosono.
28. Petrus Cornelian.

204 KNIGHTS VOL. II.

The Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, in the Suburbs of London.

FOunded by Jordan Briset, a Baron, about the year 1100. on ten Acres of Land which he had in exchange from the Nuns of Clerkenwell, which Nunnery he had founded not long before. The Church of this Hospital was dedicated in honour of St. John Baptist by Heraclius Patriarch of Jerusalem, Anno Dom. 1185. The foresaid Jordan endow'd this House with fourteen Acres of Land adjoyning upon the ClerksWell. Robert de Fun gave to the Brethren of this House the Hermitage of Tevelie, with a Condition that the said Brothers should admit him into their Order, at such time as he pleased, whether in Health or Sickness. Many others were Benefactors, among the rest Robert de Vere Earl of Oxford gave to the Prior and Brothers of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England two Knights Fees, William Earl of Ferrars, Hugh de Bellocampo, Gilbert de Monteschet, etc., gave divers other Lands, and Churches, etc., recited and confirm'd by King John Anno 1. These Knights of St. John claimed a Priviledge to bury the Bodies of such who had given Alms to their Fraternity, however they came to their death, whereupon it happen'd. Anno 4. E. 1. that certain Fellons having been executed, some of the Servants of these Knights went to the Gallows and took 'em down to bury, one of which Fellons, Adam le Messer by name, being laid in the Grave came to life again, and fled to the Neighbouring Church for Sanctuary, where he remain'd till he abjured the Realm. Pope Clemens having in the Council of Vienna supprest the Order of Knights Templers, and given all their Lands and Possessions, moveable and immoveable to these Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem, King Edw. the II. Anno 7. granted his Letters of Mandamus all over England, for putting the same in execution, in this Kingdom. The like Grant was made by Act of Parliament, Anno 17. E. 1. However Hugh Spencer the younger by force seized and held from them their Mannor of the New Temple, London, which upon his Attainder came to the hands of King Edward the III. who in the twelfth year of his Reign, did, give, grant, and sell, in consideration of 100 l. part of the said Mannor of the New Temple then valued at 7 l. 5s. 2d. together with the Church, Coemitary, and Cloyster, etc., to the Prior of St. John's and his Successors. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 108.

Of the Knights Templers in England.

ANno Dom. 1118. Certain Religious Knights, of whom the principal were Hugh de Raganis, and Godfrey de S. Audomaro, engaged themselves to the Service of Christ, before the Patriarch of Jerusalem, and undertook to live after the Mannor of Canons Regular. King Baldwin granted them a Habitation in part of his Palace adjoyning to the Temple, and he and others gave them other Gifts whereon to subsist. Their chief profession was to guard the Roads from Theives for the safety of Pilgrims. Their Habit was white with a red Cross. Their number did in a little time so increase, that they had in their Convent above three hundred Knights, besides others, and as their number so their Possessions did swell to a vast and invidious value. Anno Dom. 1240. the Church belonging

VOL. II. of St. JOHN, Etc. 205

to these Knights at the Place call'd the New Temple in London was dedicated on Ascention day, the King and a great Concourse of Peers and great Persons being present. Anno Dom. 1147. Conrad Emperor of Germany and Lewis King of France, with great forces of French, English, Normans, and Britains, made an expedition against the Pagans in the Holy Land, but returned with Little or no success at that time; These Knights Templers having been very Treacherous to the Christians at the Seige of Damascus, which City had been taken by King Lewis but for them, Anno Dom. 1307. (1. Edward 1.) These Knights were Imprison'd throughout all Christendome, for certain Enormities and Superstitions crept into their Order, and all their Estates real and personal Seized.

Of the New Temple at London.

King Henry III. by a solemn and formal Deed of Grant dated the nineteenth year of his Reign, gave his Body to be buried, when it shall please God to take him out of this Life, at the New Temple in London. The like did Queen Alianor. The said King Henry III. granted to the Master and Brothers of this House (Magistre & Fratribus militiae Temp'i Sae lomonis Jerusalem) and to their Successors 8 l. yearly out of the Exchequer for the Maintenance of three Chaplains in the New Temple at Londnu. King Henry the II. gave the said Knights the whole Water Course of Fleet with a place near Castle Bainard for the making a Mill, with a Messuage upon the Fleet near the Bridge. He also granted the Church of St. Clements Danes with all it appurtenances. Pope Innocent granted that none who should fly into the Houses of these Knights Templers for safety or Protection, should be disturb'd, nor their Goods taken, under Pain of Excommunication. One of these Priviledged Places belonging to these Knights was PParishe Garden otherwise call'd Wideflete, in Suthwark (vide page 543) Concerning which divers Statutes and Orders were made by John Duke of Bedford, Farmer of that place. Anno 1320. Some of which were, That every person flying thither for safety should be examined for what Cause he flyes, whether for another mans Debt, or Felony, or Trespass; and then his name and the Cause to be registred, That he shall be sworn to be of good behaviour in the said Priviledged place, while he remains there, etc. If his flight be for Fellony he shall be kept under a Guard of six men of the Society, If any person strike another he shall pay to the Lord 6s. 8d. if he draw bloud, 13s. 4d. If any one commit fellony after his reception he shall lose his Priviledged and be committed to the Prison of the Kings Bench. If any person take in a Whore or be convict of Fornication or Adultery within the Priviledged places, he shall forfeit to the Lord 6s. 8d. and lose his Priviledge. Bernard de Ballolio gave to these Knights 15 l. per Annum, of his Lands in England, arising at Hichen in Hartfordshire. This guift was made at Paris, in the Presence of the Aposlolick Lord Eugenius, the King of France, Several ArchBishops and one hundred and thirty Knights of this Order. Confirm'd afterwards by King Steven. Anno Dom. 1185, an Inquisition was made by Frier Galfrid, Son of Steven, of all the Lands, Churches, Mills, Rents of Assize, etc., belonging to this Order in England; which Particulars take up fifteen pages, and being as I conceive, of no use in this Abridgment, I shall not take any further notice of them, but refer the Curious to the Book at large. Anno Dom 1434. Frier John Stillingfleet compiled a Book of the names,

206 KNIGHTS VOL. II.

of all the Several Founders or Benefactors of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, and of all the Lands, Churches, Preceptories Mannors, Houses, Rents, etc., given as well to the said Hospital, as to the Knights Templers in England etc., begins with the Lord Jordan Briset who in the Reign of King Hen. I. Founded the House and Hospital of St. John at Clerkenwell, and since him reckons up some hundreds of other Benefactors, with the Lands, etc., by them given, among whom I shall observe, Wil. Maundeville Earl of Essex gave to the Brothers of this Hospital five Bucks to be received yearly between the Feasts of St. John Baptist, and St. Michael, and five Does between St. Michael and Lent, for ever out of his Park of Enfelde. William Longeford Knt. William Coterell and others gave divers Tenements in the Parish of St. Dunstans West, with divers Rents in Fleet- Street, the Pasture called Fiketzfeld, the Mills of Wideflete, with the Garden called Parish-Garden, with many other Lands, Tenements, and Pastures in Southwark, Lambethe, and Newington, etc. The Lady Joan Gray Widow of Sir Robert Gray Knt. gave them the Mannor of Hampton near Kingston with all the Appurtenances, Anno 1212. with other Lands elsewhere. Sir Thomas de Saunford Knt. gave them the mannor of Saunford in Oxfordshire. Roger de Moubray gave to the Templers many Lands, among the rest, he gave them the Preceptory of Balfalle, in Warwickshire. Maud Countess of Clare, Widow of William, and Mother of Richard Earl of Clare, gave divers Lands. Hubert de Ria, gave the Templers divers Revenues in the same year that Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury out of anger and ill will departed from the King at Northampton; So runs the Date of the Deed, Robert de Everyngham gave the Templers the Mannor of Ronstone, etc., and Gilbert de Gressy gave them, there, two Quarentenes or Furlongs of Heath (bruerae) and Pasture for five hundred Sheep, this Preceptory was call'd Temple Bruer. Simon de Montefort Earl of Leicester gave the Templers large Possessions near Leicester. William de Erlegh had given Bucklande to he a Monastery of Canons, but they having misbehaved themselves and forfeited their Estate there, King Henry the II. about the year 1180. gave their House and Estate thereto belonging, to the Prior of St. John of Jerusalem, for the Habitation of certain Sisters of that Order, conditioning that this should be the only House in England for such Sisters. Robert de Ros and abundance of the greatest Lords of this Kingdom were Benefactors to these Knights. But above all they held themselves so far obliged to Roger de Moubray, that the Templers granted to the said Roger and his Heirs, that if at any time they should happen to find any Brother of the said Order put to publick Penance for any Fault or Offence against his Rule, yet the said Roger or his Heirs should have power to release him from his said Penance, without any contradiction. And the Hospitallers granted Anno 1330. to John Lord Moubray and his Heirs forever, that in case he or they come at any time in devotion to any of their Convents beyond the Seas, to be as honourably received and served as any under the Degree of their King. King Steven, King Henry the II. King John, and King Henry the III. were great Benefactors to the Templers, the last of which granted them free Warren, Fairs and Markets, in many of their Mannors and Towns. King Richard the I. had a special love for the Knights Hospitallers by reason he had received from the Master and Brothers of the Hospital many benefits for himself and followers when in the holy Land. King Richard the I. granted to the Templers, and also to the Hospitallers, Markets and Fairs in divers of their Towns. King Edward the II. granted

228 KNIGHTS, Etc. VOL. II.

the said Order, but not any thing appear'd to be criminal, absolutely denying that any are received in any other manner. The like Inquisitors fate at York, and tho' both at London and York they were accused of many things, yet nothing appear'd for which the Order deserved in Justice to be suppressed (nihil inventum est quod de jure videretur statum illorum anullare). However they were all in one day seized on throughout England, and imprison'd. And in the Council of Vienna, Anno Dom. 1312. the whole Order of the Templers was condemn'd and perpetually annulled; with an Inhibition that none for the future should take that Order, Profession or Habit, under pain of the greater Excommunication. After which the Knights Hospitallers of St. John obtain'd most part of their Possessions. At this time William Archbishop of York, moved with Charity to consider the helpless condition of the Templers in his Diocess, placed them in several Monasteries in that County, and order'd them maintenance durirg Life. Vid. infra 943. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 62. 108.

[Valued at 2385 l. 11s. 8d. per Annum.]

THomas Wolsey Cardinal Priest of St. Cicily, and Archbishop of York, by Virtue of a Commission from Pope Leo X. Dom. 1519. Composed certain Ordinances and Decrees for the better Government of the Canons Regular of St. Augustin in England: Consisting of these several Heads. Of the Union, and General Chapter of all the Canons Regular in England, to be once every three years. Of their admittance into the Order, and form of Profession. Of their Obedience, Poverty, Clausure, Habit and Tonsure; Of the Canonical Hours and Offices in the Church, and the manner of their Divine Service in their lesser Houses. Of their Dormitory, and Refectory. The Duty of Abbots and Priors; of Recreations, of the Accounts of the Houses, of forreign Affairs, of teaching Latin and sending their Students to the University of Oxford, and of the number of Canons in their Houses or Monasteries. These Statutes to be publisht and observed in every House or Monastery of Canons Regular in England, by their several Abbots, etc.

VOL. II. 209

Of the Canons of the Holy Sepulcher.

The Priory of the Holy Sepulcher in the Suburb of Warwick.

ANno Dom. 1109. Black Canons were first brought into England, and settled first at Colchester, then at London, etc. Henry Earl of Warwick erected the Priory of the Holy Sepulcher at Warwick. About that time the Christians had newly taken the Holy Land, and had instituted Canons in the Church of the Sepulcher at Jerusalem, which Canons wore the same Habit with other Canons Regular, without any distinction besides a double Cross of red in the Breast of their upper Garment. This House in Warwick was the first and Superiour of this Order in all England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, till the loss of Jerusalem, after which this Order decay'd almost to nothing, their Profits and Priviledges being transferr'd to the Trinitarians. Simon Bishop of Worcester dedicated their Altar, and Cimitery at Warwick, with express provision that the Parish-Churches of All-Saints, and St. Maries, should not suffer any diminution or detriment in their Tithes, Buryings, Oblations, Confessions, visiting the Sick, or any other accustomed Benefits to the said Churches belonging; and that these Canons should pay to the Parish or Mother Church of All Saints, an acknowledgment of 30d. yearly at the Feast of all Saints.

[Valued at 41 l. 10s. 2d. per Annum.]

THETFORD, in Norfolk.

Built and endow'd with Lands and Revenues by the old Earls of Warren, for Canons of the Holy Sepulcher. Who enjoy'd here large Liberties. Hamelin Earl of Warren base Brother of King Henry the II. granted to these Canons among other things, three Fairs, viz. One on the Invention of the Holy Cross in May, another on the Feast of the Holy Sepulcher, and the third on the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, etc. All which Grants of his Ancestors were confirm'd by John Earl of Warren. Anno Dom, 1315. (8. E. 2.)

[Valued at 59 l. 6s. 8d. per Annum.]

210 Vol. II.

Of the Order of Premonstratenses.

THE Founder of this Order was St. Norbert, born in the Diocess of Colein, of noble Parents. About the Age of thirty three years he was made Deacon, and Priest; and renouncing all Church Preferments and a large Partimony, he distributed what he had among the poor. Anno Dom. 1120. he retired to a place call'd Praemonstratum with thirteen Companions, in the Diocess of Laudunum, or Laon, a City in Picardy, and there began this Order, called from the place, Premonstratenses, according to the Rule of St. Augustin. Being called from this retirement to oppose the Heresie of Tanchelinus at Antwerp Anno 1124. he in a little time reduced the Persons infected, to the Catholick Faith. After this he was (tho' against his will) made Archbishop of Magdeburg, and became very Instrumental in planting the Christian Religion in the Northern parts of Europe, and also in healing the Schism between Innocent the III. and Peter Leo the Antipope. The Place called Premonstratum and a Chappel there, of St. John Baptist, was given to St. Norbert by Bartholmew Bishop of Laudunum, with the approbation of Lewis the VI. call'd the Gross, King of France. This place was so called, because (as is said) it was fore-shewn or Praemonstrated to be the Head Seat and Mother Church of this Order, by the Blessed Virgin, who also gave and appointed them their white Habit. It lies in a Vally formed by nature into the shape of a Cross, the four Arms of which extend East and West, North and South, of equal proportion. This Order being begun in the year 1120. as is before observed, was first introduced into England in the ninth year of King Steven, and about Anno Dom. 1146. settled at Newhouse.

NEWHUS, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Peter de Gosta for an Abbot and Canons of the Order of Premonstratenses, which Abby and Church dedicated to St. Martial, was by him endow'd with Lands and Revenues, among other things he granted them free fishing in Humber, and Tithes of his Wood, etc. All which was confirm'd, by those of whom he held his Estate, Radolf de Bajocis, and William Earl of Lincoln. This Abby was founded at Neukus in the place where the Castle formerly stood. Peter de Gosta held Lands at Newhouse by the service of five Knights Fees, of the Barons de Bajocis, who held the same of the King in Capite.

ALNEWIKE, in Northumberland.

FOunded and endowed for Canons of this Order, Anno 1147. by Eustace Fitz John, who married the Daughter and Heir of Yvo de Vescy, and by her had the Baronies of Alnewyk and Maltone, from whom descended

VOL. II. PREMONSTRATENSES. 211

the noble Family of Vescy, whose Heirs General were married to Muscamp, and Bolbek.

[Valued at 189 l. 15s. per Annum.]

BLIBURG, in Suffolk.

KING Richard the I. recited and confirm'd to these Canons the several Lands and Rents given them by many Benefactors. The Founder and Patron of this Priory was the Abbot of St. Osiths.

[Valued at 48 l. 8s. 10d. per Annum.]

HEPPE, in Westmorland.

THIS Priory was first founded in honour of St. Mary Magdalen at Preston, by Thomas Son of Gospatric, and by him endow'd with divers Lands; among other things he gave the Canons here as much Wood as they would take out of his Woods, and to grind at his Mill toll-free. The said Thomas gzvc them also Pasture in and about Swindale, for sixty Cows, twenty Mares, five hundred Sheep, etc. With other Possessions in the Territory of the Town of Heppe where this Convent was new erected. Confirm'd by Robert de Veteriponte.

[Valued at 154 l. 17s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

TUPHOLME, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the III. Anno 20. Confirmed to the Abbot and Canons of St. Mary of Tupholm, the several Lands and Possessions given them by Gilbert de Nevill, and Alan de Nevill his Brother, and divers other Benefactors. The first Founder was Robert de Nova Villa, or Nevill, who held Lands of the King in Capite from the time of the Conquest, wherewith he endow'd this House.

[Valued at 100 l. 14s. 10d. per Annum.]

WELLEBEC, in Nottinghamshire.

JOceus le Flemangh came into England in the Conquerours Army and obtain'd from that King divers Lands in Cukeney, etc. In this Town lived on Gamelbere, an old Tenant in Capite before the Conquest, who held of the King two Carucates of Land, by the Service of shooing the Kings Palfrey on all four feet, with the Kings Nails (de cluario Domini Regis) as oft as the King should be at his Mannour of Maunsfeld, and if he should lame (si inclaudet) the Palfrey, then he should give the King another Palfrey of four marks price, this Gamelbere dying without issue the said Estate came by Escheat to King Henry I. who gave it to Richard Son of the said Joceus, and his heirs to hold by the same Service. This Richard had issue by Hawise a Kinswoman of the Earl of Ferrars, Thomas, who became the Founder of this Abby, where a Church of St. James

212 PREMONSTRATENSES. VOL. II.

was then erected, he also endow'd the same with Lands and Revenues augmented and confirm'd by his Descendents Simon Fitz-Simon and Isabel his Wife, Walter de Faucumberge and Agnes his Wife etc. Anno Dom. 1329. Henry de Faucumberge past the Mannour of, and all his Estate in, Cukeney, with the Advowson of this Abby, to John de Hothom Bishop of Ely, who four days after conveyed all the premisses, except the Advowson of the Abby, to the Abbot and Convent of St. James at Welbeck; and by another Deed dated 15 days after in the same year John de Nottingham then Abbot of this Abby, obliged himself and Successors to find eight Canons of his Abby for the daily celebration of the Divine Offices for the Souls in the said Deed mention'd and to celebrate the Anniversary of the said Bishop in like manner as of their first and principal Founder, etc. And to this also he and all the Canons of this House obliged themselves by Oath before a publick Notary, etc. Richard Basset Knight gave to this Abby the Town of Duckmanton, which being held of the Barony of Henry de Stutevill, was by him confirm'd, saving to him the Service of one Knights Fee. The other Lands, etc., belonging to this Abby in Cukeney and elsewhere, were all confirm'd by King Henry II.

[Valued at 249 l. 6s. 3d. per Annum.]

CROXTON, in Leicestershire.

WIlliam Parcarius Son of Ingeram Parcarius gave two parts of the Park of Croxton to this Priory; Hugh Brother of the said William confirm'd the said Gift, and gave other Lands, etc., towards the Building of the Church. Also he gave his whole Demeasne of Croxton to these Canons to hold in fee farm at the Rent of four marks per Annum. Margery de Sancto Albino gave them the other third part of Croxton Park. William Earl of Bolon, and John Earl of Morton, Confirm'd their Estate at Croxton, and gave other Lands. The abovementioned Ingeram Parcarius was also call'd Ingeram le Porter, and came into England at the Conquest. King Edward I. Anno 1. confirm'd to the Abbot and Canons of the Church of St. John the Evangelist and Apostle, at Croxton, otherwise call'd the Church of St. John de Valle all their Lands, and granted them free Chace at Croxton. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 73.

[Valued at 385 l. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

LEYSTONE, in Suffolk.

FOunded in the time of King Henry II. by Radulphus de Glanville, and by him endow'd with the Mannour of Leystone. The Advowson of this Abby coming to the Crown by the forfeiture of Michael de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, King Richard II. Anno 12. confirm'd to the Abbot and Convent of this House their Estate, and granted them free Election of their Abbot, that in time of Vacation neither he nor his heirs nor any of his or their Officers would seize the Temporalities, nor intermeddle in the same, nor should any Abbot and Convent of this House be ever compell'd to grant any Corody or Pension to any Person. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 74.

[Valued at 181 l. 17s. 1d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. PREMONSTRATENSES. 213

BEAUCHIEF, in Derbyshire.

RObert Fitz-Ranulf Lord of Alferton, Morton, and Marnham, was one of those four Knights, who martyr'd the Blessed Thomas Arch-Bishop of Canterbury, in expiation of which Act he founded this Monastery of Bello Capite, or Beuchef; dedicated to St. Thomas the Martyr. Thomas de Cadurcis (or Chaworth) descended by an Heir General from the said Robert, gave divers Lands to this House, and confirm'd all the Gifts of his Ancestors. King Edward II. Anno 9. recited and confirm'd the Lands, etc., given to the Abbot and Canons of this House, by their several Benefactors.

[Valued at 126 l. 5s. 4d. per Annum.]

BLANCLAND, in Northumberland.

FOunded for twelve Canons of the Order of Premonstratenses by Walter de Bokbek, and by him endow'd with divers Lands etc.

[Valued at 40 l. 9d. per Annum.]

NEWBO, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded and endow'd with Lands and Churches by Richard Malebisse. Confirm'd by King Henry III. Anno 9. Among other things the foresaid Richard gave the Canons of this House certain Lands in Estwisell held of John de Lasey Earl of Lincoln by Ward, Releif, and Scutage, etc., all which Services the said Earl afterwards released and quit claim'd to these Canons in pure and perpetual almes.

[Valued at 71 l. 8s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

LAVINDENE, in Buckinghamshire.

FOunded by John Bidun and by him endow'd with divers Lands and Churches. Ranulph Earl of Chester, and Ralf de Bray, with divers others, were Benefactors, all whose gifts were confirm'd to the Canons of the Church of St. John Baptist at Lavindene by King Henry III. Anno 11.

[Valued at 79 l. 13s. 8d. per Annum.]

WENDLYNG, in Norfolk.

FOunded and endow'd with Lands, etc. by William de Wendlyng, in free and perpetual Almes. Confirm'd by King Edward III. Anno 6. And by Robert de Stutevill, Anno 1273. (1. Edward 1.)

[Valued at 55 l. 18s. 4d. per Annum.]

214 PREMONSTRATENSES. VOL. II.

HAGNEBY, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded in honour of St. Thomas the Martyr, Archbishop of Canterbury by the Lady Agnes de Orreby, Wife of Herbert de Orreby, Anno 22. Henry the II. Richard Bishop of Lincoln (52. H. 3.) and Philip de Kyme (4. E. 1.) with divers others were Benefactors.

[Valued at 87 l. 11s. 4d. per Annum.]

STANLY Park, commonly call'd Dale, in Derbyshire.

IT is said that a certain Baker living in the Parish of St. Mary at Derby, a man very Religious and a great Alms-giver, was admonisht in a Vision to leave all that he had, and betake himself to a solitary Life in a Place call'd Depedale, which accordingly he did. This was a Desert and Moorish place East from Derby, near Stanley. Radulfus Son of Geremundus, Lord of the place, accidentally discovering this Hermit in his poor Habitation, as he was hunting, and commiserating his Condition, granted him the Soil where his Hermitage stood and also the Tith of his Mill of Burg, for his maintenance. The Daughter of this Radulfus was married to Serlo de Grendon Lord of Badeley, to whom his Aunt and Godmother, call'd The Gome of the Dale, (Gome in old English signified a Godmother) gave Depedale. These two assembled hither certain Canons from a Religious House at Kalke, to whom they gave this Place, where they built a sumptious Church and Monastery, which obtain'd from Rome ample Priviledges. But these Canons becoming very relax in their Divine Offices, and more given to hunting, and the Pleasures of the Forrest, than to the Church and Prayer, for which being in danger to be removed, they by way of Prevention resigned all they had here into the hands of their Patron, and return'd to the place from whence they came, except Humfrey their Prior who retired to a place call'd the Magdalen, and became a Hermit. But this House became not hereby desolate, but afterwards rise to a greater degree of honour, (Ludit in adversis divina potentia rebus) for after this there came hither six Canons of the Order of Premonstratenses from Tupholme, invited by the Patron. But these also misbehaved themselves, and were recall'd to Tupholme. Hereupon William de Grendhon, then Patron, procured five other Canons Of the same Order from Welbeck. These also after some time return'd back, discouraged by excessive Poverty. At last William Son of the foresaid Radulf, with his Daughter Maud married to Jeffrey Sawcemere, but childless, and the foresaid William de Grendon, the Patron, his Sisters Son, joyn'd together in making a Fair and sufficient Endowment of Lands to this House, procuring nine Canons from Newhouse, to whom they gave the Town and Park of Stanley, the Dominion of Depedale, with other Lands in Okebroke, etc. All which with their other Possessions given by other Benefactors, were confirm'd to the Abbot and Canons of Stanlegh Park by King Henry the III. Anno 19. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 72.

[Valued at 144 l. 12s. per Annum.]

VOL. II. PREMONSTRATENSES. 215

LANGDONE, in Kent, a Cell to Leystone.

FOunded by William de Auberville, and by him endow'd with the Town of Langedone and divers other Lands; confirm'd by Simon de Albrinciis his chief Lord, and Nicholas da Cryoll descended of the foresaid William the Founder.

WEST-DERHAM, in Norfolk.

FOunded by Hubert Dean of York, for the good of his own Soul, and the Souls of his Father and Mother, and of Ranulph de Glanville and Bertra his Wife who brought him up. He became afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury, and endow'd this Abby with many Lands, all which was confirm'd by King John, Anno 1. who also granted to the Canons of this House very great Liberties, and Immunities; as to be quit from all Tolls throughout the Kingdom, both for themselves and their men, etc.

[Valued at 228 l. ob. per Annum.]

BILEGH, alias Maldone, in Essex.

THE Canons of Perendune removed to Malden, Anno Dom. 1180. Robert Mantell was their Founder. King Richard the I. Anno 1. confirm'd all their Lands and Revenues, with the grant of Liberties.

[Valued at 157 l. 16s. 11d. per Annum.]

SULBY, in Northamptonshire.

THIS Abby of St. Mary de Welleford afterwards call'd the Abby of Suleby was founded by William de Wideville. King Richard the I. granted these Canons divers Immunities. Robert de Pavily Knt. granted them his Mannor of Suleby to hold of the Abbot and Convent of Westminster, being Lords of the Fee, at the yearly Rent of 102 l. and of him the said Robert by the Payment of one pound of Cummin, (Cimini) or 2d. at Easter yearly, for all Services and Demands. Divers other Benefactors gave other Lands in Northamptonshire and elsewhere, among whom were John de Lacy Constable of Chester, Ralph Basset, etc. All confirm'd and recited by King Edward the II. Anno 9.

[Valued at 258 l. 8s. 5d. per Annum.]

COKERSAND, in Lancashire.

FOunded by Theobald Walter, Brother of Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, for Canons of the Premonstratenses, to whom he gave in pure and perpetual Alms the Hay (or inclosed groundj call'd Pyling for the erecting of this Abby. Confirm'd by King John, Anno 2. All which,

216 PREMONSTRATENSES. VOL. II.

with other Lands granted by William de Lancaster, John de Lasey Earl of Lincoln, and Constable of Chester, and by Jeffrey Son of the Lord John, and others, were recited and confirm'd by King Richard the II. Anno 7. A Contest happening between the Prior of Lancaster, and the Abbot of Cokersand, about Tithes and other Rights of the Church, it was agreed and settled by Papal Authority, Anno 1216. that the Prior should have two parts of the Corn Tithes in Lancaster and Pulton, and this Abbot one third part; also that the Abbot of Cokersand shall not admit any of the Parishioners of the Prior of Lancaster to Sepulture at his Convent, without the Priors License, etc. The Abbot and Convent of Leicester (de pratis) granted to the Canons of Cokersand the Scite of the Hospital of Cokersand, for the making of an Abby, which change from an Hospital to a Monastery, of Premonstratenses, was made Anno 1190.

BEGEHAM, in Sussex.

THIS Abby was first founded at Hotteham, by Ralph de Dena, and by him endow'd with Lands, etc. Translated from thence to Begeham, otherwise call'd Benlin, by Ela de Saukvile Daughter of the first Founder, whose Son Jeffrey de Saukvile confirm'd the Estate of these Canons. Confirm'd also by Gilbert de Aquila, Robert de Turnham, Walkelin Maminot, and Richard Earl of Clare and Hereford were also Benefactors, all whose Gifts were confirm'd by King John. King Henry the III. Anno 35. granted to these Canons a weekly Market on the Thursday, at their Mannor of Rokeland, and a Fair there for three days at Midsomer. Which with their other Possessions, was confirm'd by King Edward the II. Anno 6. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 77.

BARLINGS, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Ralph de Haye with the Consent of Richard Haye his Brother, confirm'd by King Henry the II. and King John, Anno 16. The Bardolfs, and Longspes were Benefactors.

BRODHOLME, in Nottinghamshire.

KING Edward the II. Anno 12. recited and confirm'd the several Lands and Possessions given to the Brothers and Sisters of Brodholme, by divers Benefactors; among whom, Ralph de Albaniaco, Walter de Clifford and Agnes his Wife, etc.

[Valued at 16 l. 5s. 2d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. PREMONSTRATENSES. 217

COVERHAM, in Yorkshire.

THIS Monastery was first founded at Swayneby, Anno Dom. 1190. by Helewisia Daughter and Heir of Ranulf de Glanvilla a Baron, and Capital Justice of England, in the time of King Henry the II. and Richard the I. It was afterwards translated from Swayneby to Coverham near Midleham, by Ralph Fitz-Robert descended from the said Helewisia. The Lands, etc. given to this House by the Foundress and her Son Walleran Fitz-Robert, and Ralph Fitz-Robert, Edric Neusum, and others, were all confirm'd by King Edward the III. Anno 22. Of this Family did descend two Sisters Co-heirs, Mary Lady of Midleham, married to Ralph de Nevile, and Joan married to Robert de Fatershall.

[Valued at 160 I. 18i. 3d per Annum.]

St. AGATHA near Richmund, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by one Roaldus the Constable (possibly of Richmond Castle) Roger de Moubray, Alan Bygot and others were Benefactors, whose Grants were recited and confirm'd by King Edw. III. Anno 3. Richard le Scrope of Bolton by License of King Rich. II. granted to the Abbot and Convent of this House a yearly Rent of 150 l. for the Maintenance of ten Canons, over and above the common number then in the Monastery, and of two Secular Chaplains to celebrate for the said Richard and his Heirs, etc., and for the Maintenance of twenty two poor men in the said Abby. This Richard le Scrope had been the Kings Chancellour, and gave also to this Abby the Mannor of Brompton upon Swale, then valued at 10 l. 3s. 4d. per Annum.

[Valued at 111 l. 17s. 11 d. per Annum.]

TORRE, in Devonshire.

THIS Church and Abby of St. Saviours of Torre was founded by William Briwer, and by him endow'd with many Lands and with the Church of Torre, etc., to hold in free, pure, and perpetual Alms. King John confirm'd to these Canons all their Possessions, with the Grant of large Franchises, and Immunities from Scutage, and all Gelds, and Tolls etc., for themselves and their men. From this William Briwere the Founder descended Reginald de Mohun, who in the thirty six of King Henry the III. had a grant from this Abbot and Convent of Liberty to erect a Chappel in his Court at Thorre for himself and proper Family, but not to baptize there, nor admit any of the Parishioners to any Ecclesiastical Rights, the said Abbot and Convent to receive one Moiety of all Oblations or Obventions arising in the said Chappel, etc.

[Valued at 396 l. 11d. per Annum.]

219 PREMONSTRATENSES. VOL. II.

HALES-OWEN, in Shropshire.

THE Mannor and Advowson of the Church of Hales was given by King John Anno 16. to Peter de Rupibus Bishop of Winchester, for the erecting of a Religious House, which was accordingly founded here by that Bishop, and by him endowed with this Estate. Confirm'd by King Henry the III. Roger Bishop of Coventry and Litchfidd, Anno 1248. appropriated the Church of Waleshale to this Abby, after the death of Vincent then Rector of the said Church, saving out of the same a Vicaridge of thirteen Marks to be assigned to a Vicar, with all Obventions, etc. Anno Dom. 1270. Godfrey Bishop of Worcester made a Settlement between the Abbot of Hales, and the Perpetual Vicar of the Parish Church there, the said Vicar to have and receive from the Abbot ten Marks yearly, a House with Out Houses, Orchard, Garden, and the Vesture of the Churchyard; The Canons to find another Priest to be under the Vicar (Presbiterm secundarium) and to bear all ordinary and extraordinary Charges. John de Hamptone, Joan Botetourt, and John her Son, gave divers Mannors, and Advowsons, to this Abby, conditioning for Chantrys. Wolfstan Bishop of Worcester appropriated to this Abby the Church of Clent and Chappel of Rouley, reserving to the perpetual Vicar who hath the Cure of Souls there, a Revenue of 10 l. viz. a Messuage and Curtelage on the South side of the Churchyard, with Tith of Calves, Lambs, etc., and all small Tithes (except of the Monasteries proper Lands) Mortuaries, the Herbage and Trees of the Churchyard, and all the Altarage.

[Valued at 280 l. 13s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

LANGLEY, in Norfolk.

FOunded by Robert Fitz-Roger, and endow'd with Lands, etc. All which were confirm'd to these Canons by King John, Anno 1. with the grant of large Liberties, and Immunities from all Tolls and Taxes.

[Valued at 104 l. 16s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

TITCHFIELD, in Hampshire.

KING Henry the III. Anno 16. granted his Mannor of Tickefeud to Peter de Rupibus Bishop of Winchester, to found an Abby of Premonstratenses, and further granted to the said Abby very great Liberties in the said Mannor and their other Lands, with very great Immunities, and to be free and discharged from Tolls, etc., and from suit to any Forrest Courts, and from the expeditating or lawing of Dogs, and this not only for themselves, but all their Men dwelling on their Lands. Other Benefactors to this Abby were Eua de Clinton, Reginald de Albamara, Baldwin de Ripariis Lord of the Isle, Gilbert le Mansel, Peter de Sukemund, who gave certain Land in Ingepenne to hold of the Chief Lord of the Fee by the Service of

VOL. II. PREMONSTRATENSES. 219

half a Knights fee, and of himself and his Heirs by one pair of Spurs, or 3d. at the Feast of St. Michael, etc. All whose Gifts were confirm'd to this House by King Edward the II. Anno 11. An Inventory of the Goods of this Monastery was taken, Anno Dom. 1420. before John Powle Abbot of Hales-Owen, Visitor of this Place, and it was then found that they had no Monies in their Treasury, but were 43 l. 4s. in Debt; and the House ingaged in 62 l. 6d. In the Sacristy, one Silver-Cup gilt for keeping the Sacrament, two great Chalices gilt, and twelve lesser ones, a great Silver Vessel full of Relicks, a great Silver Cross gilt with the Images of Mary and John, two Candlesticks Silver and gilt, etc. In the Treasury many pieces of Plate, some of great size, etc. In divers Mannors belonging to this Church four and thirty Horses, ten Mares, four Foals, one hundred and fifty four Oxen, seven Bulls, nine and fifty Cows, etc., three hundred eighty and one Muttons, one hundred Lambs, etc., seventeen Boars, twenty four Sows, thirty three Hogs, one hundred and twenty six lesser Swine, and eighty nine Pigs.

[Valued at the Suppression at 249 l. 16s. 1d. per Annum.]

220 GILBERTINES. VOL. II.

Of the Order of St. Gilbert of Sempringham.

THe Life of this St. Gilbert is writ very largely, out of which I shall here observe only the most Remarkable Passages, as breifly as may be. He was born at Sempringham in Lincolnshire his Fathers name was Jocelinus, of Norman Extraction, but having large Possessions in this County. In his youth he was sent into France for the Improvement of his Learning. At his return to the place of his Nativity, he instructed the Country Children, Boys and Girls, in the Rudiments of Learning and the Methods of a Religious Life. And the Churches of Sempringham and Tirington being void, his Father Presented him Parson of the same. After this he became a Domestick Clerk in the Family of Alexander Bishop of Lincoln, by whom he was made Priest. All this while he was of such Exemplary Piety that he became of great note for Sanctity of life. Worldly Honours and Riches he despised, and refused to be an Archdeacon in the Church of Lincoln, which was offered him with considerable Advantages. This was in the Reign of King Henry I. At which time he begun his Order after this Mannor; Seven young Virgins, who voluntarily left the World, shut themselves up in a solitary Habitation adjoyning to the North wall of the Church of St. Andrew at Sempringham, and submitted to his Government and direction in Spirituals. Their Apartment had but one Door kept Lockt, Their Diet and Releif they received in at a Window. For the Assistance of these he appointed certain Lay Sisters, and for the outward Service of the House certain Lay Brothers. From this Beginning this Order encreased to many Monasteries, built, endow'd, and encouraged by the great Men of this Kingdom. Pope Eugenius gave him the headship or Government of this Order. To assist him in his Office of Superspection he Collected Clerks who might take part of the Care of the Government of his Nunneries off of him, and this was the Original of the Canons of this Order. These Canons were to live in a Separate habitation, and never to have any access to that of the Nuns, unless for the administration of some Sacrament, and that before many Witnesses, but the same Church to serve for both. Yet had they two Rules; the Nuns that of St. Benedict, the Canons that of St. Augustin, with some special Orders. St. Gilbert tho' Cheif of this Order yet lived with as much hardship in fasting, Watching, and all other Austerities as the meanest of them all. He abstain'd wholly from flesh, unless in Sickness, and from Fish also in Lent and Advent. In the Reign of King Henry II. he fell into great Troubles by reason of his siding with Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury and his releiving him with monies when he fled into France, but at length he was freed from them, and set at Liberty. After this he had new Afflictions from the malicious Scandals of some lay Brothers of his own Order, but his patience brought him out of these Troubles also, and his Innocency and merit was certified by almost all the Bishops of England, and by King Henry II. himself. In his old Age he was deprived

VOL. II. GILBERTINES. 221

of his sight, but the vigor of his mind remain'd as perfect as ever, with all the vertubus faculties of his Soul not in the least decay'd. Observing still the same, or greater austerities in the Course and Discipline of living. The day he spent in either hearing somthing read, or in Prayer, or spiritual Discourses; he heard nothing with patience but what related to God and a good life, and himself spoke little, and that only what was holy and useful. He lived to be above one hundred years of age, and dyed Anno Dom. 1189 and was buried at Sempringham, four days after his death, in the Presence of all the Priors and Prioresses of this Order, several other Abbots and Noble persons, and people of all qualities above two thousand. Many Miracles are said to be wrought through his intercession, after this. An enquiry into the truth of which Reports was made at Sempringham, Anno 1201. before certain Commissioners appointed by Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, and again after that, by Papal Authority. The Consequence of which was the Canonization of St. Gilbert and the Inserting his name into the Catalogue of Saints, Anno Dom. 1202. in the Papacy of Innocent III.

THe Institutions made by the blessed Gilbert and his Successors for the Government of this Order of Sempringham are very large and consist of Divers general Chapters, or Heads, and those divided into many Subdivisions. I shall take Notice only of the Principal Titles, And refer to the Book at 1arge for particulars.

The first Treats of the Rise and beginning of the Order, and of the Election of the Master, etc.

Of the Principal Examiners or Searchers (Scrutaboribus) their Constitution, and Authority, etc.

Of the four Procurators in each House of this Order, etc.

Of the Canons and Novices, and their Age, and of the Lay Canons, etc.

Of the Brothers, their Institution, Apparel, and Duties, etc.

Of the Nuns, and such matters as relate to them and their Houses.

Of the Lay Sisters, their Apparel and manner of Life.

Of the Sick and Infirm Nuns and Sisters, how to be treated.

Of the Office of the Dead, and Funeral Matters, etc.

Of some Rules relating equally to the Nuns and Sisters.

Of the Unity and friendship between all the Houses of this Order.

Of the Grand Chapter of the Order to be held yearly. In the end of this last Chapter; the Founder of the Order Provides that in the Several Houses of the Men the Number shall not excttd 394 in all; and in those of the Women the number of Nuns and Sisters together shall not exceed 960.

THis order was first Instituted in England in the Reign of King Steven. Anno Dom. 1148. by Master John Gilbert of Sempringham; William Bishop of Norwich writ a very high Commendation of this Gilbert, and of all the Religious of his Order, by way Testimonial, to Pope Alexander III.

222 GILBERTINES. VOL. II.

The Priory of Sempringham, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Gilbert de Gaunt, and by him and others endow'd with divers Lands in Lincolnshire. John Dalderby Bishop of Lincoln by his Deed dated at Buchden, Anno Dom. 1303. granted License to the Schollers of the Convent of Sempringham, Studying Divinity or Philosophy, in St. Peter's Parish in Stamford, to have a Chaplain to celebrate in their private Chappel there, saving the Rights of the Parish-Church of St. Peter there. Robert Lutterel, Rector of Irnham, gave for the maintenance of the said Schollers so studdying at Stamford as aforesaid, the House where they inhabited, with divers Lands and Tenements in Keten, Cotismore, and Casterton, in Rutland. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 107.

[Valued at 317 l. 4s. 1d. per Annum.]

HAVERHOLME, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Alexander Bishop of Lincoln, and by him endowed with the Isle then called Hafreholm. Anno Dom. 1139.

[Valued at 70 l. 15s. 10s. ob. per Annum.]

CHIKESAND, in Bedfordshire.

PAganus de Bellocampo and Rohaisa his Wife gave many Lands to this House. King Edward the II. in the tenth year of his Reign granted his License to John Blundel to give the Mannor of Chikesonde with its appurtenances to the Prior and Convent of this House.

[Valued at 212 l. 3s. 5d. ob. per Annum.]

BOLINGTON, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Simon Fitz-William in his Park of Bolyngton, and by him endowed with part of his said Park, and divers other Lands in pure and perpetual Alms. William de Kima confirm'd to the Prior and Convent of both Sexes at Bolyngton, all their Lands and Revenues, A.D. 1256. Robert Patrel of Cotes being received into the Fraternity of this House, gave them at the same time the Church of Houtun and Advowson of the same. The Crevequers, or Creukers, Barons of Redburn, were Benefactors to this Priory, giving divers Lands in pure and perpetual Alms.

[Valued at 158 l. 7s. 11d. per Annum.]

VOL. II. GILBERTINES. 223

WATTON, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by Eustachius Son of John and Agnes his Wife, for Nuns, and thirteen Canons to serve and provide for them, according to the Institution of the Order of Sempringham. To whom he gave the Town of Watton, etc. Confirm'd by William Fossard Lord of the Fee, and by Henry Archbishop of York. Confirm'd also by Roger de Lasci Constable of Chester descended from the said Eustachius. King John also gave them Lands in the first year of his Reign. Eustachius the Founder married for his first Wife a Daughter and Heir of Ivo de Vescy, from which match descended several of the Vescys; and for his second Wife Agnes Daughter of William Constable of Chester.

[Valued at 360 l. 16s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

ALVINHAM, in Lincolnshire.

Peter de Melfa and Beatrix his Wife gave to the Church of St. Mary of Alvingham, and to the Nuns and Brethren there, divers Lands and Revenues in Alvingham and elsewhere, confirm'd by John their Son, Anno Dom. 1232. Henry Bishop of Lincoln certified to the Treasurer and Barons of the Exchequer, Anno Dom. 1401, the names of all the Churches that were appropriated to the Order of Gilbertines. Pope Innocent the III. confirm'd the Lands and Possessions of this Order, etc.

[Valued at 128 l. 14s. 2d. per Annum.]

St. ANDREWS, in the Suburbs of York.

FOunded at Fishergate at York, by Hugh Murdac, and by him endow'd with Lands, Tenements, and Rents in and about York. A.D. 1202, an exchange of certain Revenues was made by mutual consent between Simon then Dean, and the Chapter of St. Peters at York; and Roger then Prior of this House, and Hugh Murdac.

[Valued at 47 l. 14s. 3d. ob. per Annum.]

STIKESWOULD, in Lincolnshire.

IT was found by Inquisition taken at Stanford 3. E. 1. That the Master and Nuns of Stikeswald held divers Lands at Huntington, of the Gift of several Benefactors.

[Valued at 114 l. 5s. 2d. ob. per Annum.]

ORMESBY, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded and endowed with Lands by Gilbert Son of Robert de Ormesby.

224 GILBERTINES. VOL. II.

SIXILL, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by one ... de Grelle Ancestor of Thomas de la Warre. Agnes de Percy and others were Benefactors.

[Valued at 135 l. 9d. per Annum.]

MARESEY, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded and endowed by Isabell de Chauncy Widow of Sir Philip de Chauncy.

[Valued at 130 l. 13s. ob. per Annum.]

Newsted at ANCOLM, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded and endow'd, with the grant of very great Liberties and Immunities, by King Henry the II. Confirm'd by King Edward the II. Anno suo. 13. Divers Lands and Revenues were given to the Nuns of the Order of Sempringham by Peter Son of Henry de Bilingcy, whose Cousin and Heiress became the Wife of William Mason.

[Valued at 38 l. 13s. 5d. per Annum.]

KATTELEY, in Lincolnshire.

PEter Son of Peter de Belyngey confirm'd to the Nuns of Catlei and their Brethren Clerks and Laics, divers Lands in Bilingey and Walcot, given by his Ancestors.

St. CATHERINES, in the Suburb of Lincoln.

FOunded by Robert the second, Bishop of Lincoln, with the assent of his Chapter, and endowed with the Prebend of Canewich, and with the Church of Newerc, and divers Lands and Revenues at Newerc, etc. Confirm'd by King Henry the II.

[Valued at 202 l. 5s. ob. per Annum.]

HEYNINGS, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Reynerus de Evermu, and by him, and Odo de Sancta Cruce, endowed with Lands. Confirm'd by King Henry the III. Anno suo 52.

[Valued at 49 l. 5s. 2d. per Annum.]

Vol. II. GILBERTINES. 225

HOLLAND-BRIGG, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by one Godwin a Rich man of Lincoln; and named the Priory of St. Saviour.

MALTON, in Yorkshire.

Founded for Canons of this Order of Semplingham, by Eustachius Son of John. Which said Eustachius, and William de Vesci his Son, conferr'd on these Canons many Lands and Churches, so did the Flamvills, etc. From the Vescies descended Gilbert de Aton, who became Patron of this Priory, and died, Anno Dom. 1307. The Lands of this Priory were confirm'd to these Canons by King John. Anno Dom. 1200. William Laceles, Knt. granted to these Canons two Bovates of Land in old Malton, in lieu of certain Tithes by them granted to the Church of Soureby.

[Valued at 197 l. 19s. 2d. per Annum.]

SHOULDHAM, in Norfolk.

FOunded by Galfridus Son of Peter, Earl of Essex, for Nuns and their Brethren, Clerks and Laicks, and by him endow'd with the Mannor of Shouldham, and many other Lands and Churches. After which Foundation he removed the Body of his Wife Beatrix de Say, who died in Child-birth and had been buried at Chikesand, to this Priory.

[Valued at 138 l. 18s. 1d. per Annum.]

ELLERTON, in Yorkshire.

FOunded by William Son of Peter, who gave all his Inheritance in Ellerton for the making a Priory of Canons of the Order at Sempingham, and for the Habitation, and Maintenance of thirteen poor Men. Anno Dom. 1387. German de Hay then Patron of this Priory, obtain'd a grant from the Prior and Convent of this House by Indenture, that whereas the said German had then but the presentation of one poor man of the thirteen that were to be maintain'd in this Priory, for the future the said German his Heirs and Assigns Lords of the Mannor of Aghton, shall present nine of the thirteen, with the Penalty of 10 l. for every refusal to admit any poor man so presented. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 108.

[Valued at 62 l. 8s. 10d. per Annum.]

226 GILBERTINES. VOL. II.

OVETON in Hertnes, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

FOunded and endow'd with divers Lands in Oveton and elsewhere by Alan de Wiltone. For Canons of the Order of Semplingham. Confirm'd by King John, Anno suo, 5.

[Valued at 11 l. 2s. 8d. per Annum.]

WELLS, in Lincolnshire.

FOunded by Jeffrey de Hauvill, for Canons. To whom he gave all his Lands and Tenements, etc., in Welle, saving to him and his Heirs Pasture of sixty Cattle to feed with the Cattle of the Canons, saving also the Annual Rent of 5s. to be paid to him and his Heirs. Confirm'd by King John, Anno Reg. 5.

[Valued at 95 l. 6s. 1d. per Annum.]

PULTON, in Wiltshire.

FOunded in the Reign of King Edward the III. by Sir Thomas de Sancto Mauro, Knt. and by him endow'd with the Mannor of Polton then valued at 10 l. per Annum, the Mannor of Chelesworth then valued at 5 l. per Annum, with other Lands. King Edward the III. Anno suo 28. granted to the Canons here very large Liberties and Immunities.

VOL. II. 227

Of the Order of the Holy Trinity, for the Redemption of Captives.

The RULES of the Monks of the Holy Trinity were approved by Pope Innocent III. and were,

THat they should live in Chastity and without property, That all their Revenue, or what comes to their hands lawfully shall be divided into three parts; with two parts of which they shall supply their own Necessaries, the third part shall be laid by for the Redemption of Christian Captives, taken by Pagans, either by purchasing their freedom for a Sum of Mony, or by purchasing Pagan Captives in order to exchange them for Christians.

That all Churches of this Order shall be intituled of the holy Trinity, and be of plain work.

That the Brethren cohabit together, three Clerks, and three Laymen, besides their cheif, who shall be call'd their Minister.

Their Garments to be of woollen Cloath, and white. They may wear Cloaks and Breeches, but muat put them off when they lie down. They shall lie in Woollen, and not on feather Beds in their own Houses, unless in time of Sickness.

They may not ride on Horses, but on Asses they may.

They may drink Wine, provided it be with Temperance.

From the Ides of September to Easter they shall fast on the Monday, Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday (unless some solemn festival happen ) so also in Lent and other accustomed times of the Church.

Flesh they may eat if given them from abroad, or of their proper feeding, but that only on Sundays from Easter to Advent, and from Christmas to Septuagessima; and on Christmasday, Epiphany, Ascention, the Assumption, and Purification of the Blessed Mary, and Feast of all Saints. They shall buy nothing for their own Dyet, but Bread, Beans, Pease, Herbs, Oyle, Eggs, Milk, Cheese, and Fruit; but no Flesh, nor Fish, nor Wine, unless for the necessities of the Sick, and on Jorneys, etc.

In Towns where they have Houses of their own they shall not eat, nor drink out of the same, unless Water, tho' invited; nor lye out of their own Houses. The Infirm shall lye and eat by themselves: Strangers especially Religious men, that come to their Houses shall be kindly entertain'd according to the ability of the House. No Brother either Clerk or Lay but shall labour in some Office or other. They shall observe silence in the Church, Refectory, and Dortour, unless upon necessary Occasions. A Chapter shall be held every Sunday if possible, in which they shall consider of the affairs of the House, and then also an

228 TRINITARIANS. VOL. II.

Exhortation shall be made in a plain manner to all the Brethren and others of the House, instructing them in their duty of what they are to beleive and practice. If any Brother give Scandal, or strike another he shall be punisht at the will of the Minister, more or less. A General Chapter shall be held once a year, and that in the Octaves of Pentecost. The Minister shall be Elected by the Common Council of the Brethren, not for the dignity of his Birth but the Merits of his person. The Minister is either greater or Lesser; The Greater may hear the Confessions of all the Congregations of his Order, the Lesser only of his own House. If any desire to enter into this Order he shall first undergo a years Probation, or more if there be occasion, and none shall be received under-the age of twenty years.

None shall swear an Oath unless upon great Necessity by License of the Minister, or by command of the Bishops, and for an honest and just cause.

THELESFORD, in Warwickshire.

THis House, dedicated to God, St. John Baptist, and St. Radegund the Virgin, was founded by William Son of Walter de Cherlecote, for the Releif of the Poor, and for the Receit of Travellers, or Pilgrims and Religious Men there serving God; he endow'd it with several Revenues in Cherlecote. Other Benefactors were Fulk Son of William de Lucy; William de Narford Lord of Bereford, who among other things granted to the Minister and Friers of this House free Fishing in his Water of Avon on all days but Sundays, with other great Liberties and Priviledges; and William de Bello Campo Earl of Warwick. All whose gifts and Grants King Edward III. in the third year of his Reign, confirmed to Thomas de Offynton at that time Minister, and the Friers of this House, and their Successors, to hold free and quit of all Secular demands and Exactions, whose Deed bears date at Kenylworth.

[Valued at 23 l. 10s. per Annum.]

MOTTIDEN, in Kent.

THis House of Friers of the holy Cross, was first founded by Sir Robert de Rokesley Knight; the Modern Patron was the Earl of Northumberland.

[Valued at 50 l. 13s. ob. per Annum.l

INGHAM, in Norfolk.

William Staferton was the first Founder of this Priory, of later time Francis Calthorp became Patron.

[Valued at 61 l. 9s. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. II. TRINITARIANS. 229

KNARESBOROUGH, in Yorkshire.

KIng John gave certain Lands in Swinesco, to Frier Robert a Hermit in this place, which his Son King Henry III. confirm'd to Frier Ivo, by the title of Hermit of the holy Cross of Knaresburg, in the twelfth year of his Reign.

Richard King of the Romans and Earl of Cornwall, Brother to King Henry III. gave to God and to the Brothers of the Holy Trinity of Captives at Knaresburgh the Chappel of St. Robert at Knaresburgh, and all the Land which King John, his Father gave to the said Saint Robert in his life time, with other Lands, and Commons of Pasture for twenty Cows, and three hundred Sheep, and Paunage for forty Hogs, etc. Whose Deed bears date at London, Anno Dom. 1257. All which was afterward confirm'd by King Edward I. and King Edward II.

[Valued at 55 l. 10s. 11d. per Annum.]

230 VOL. II.

Additions to the First Volum of the Monasticon Anglicanum.

Page 18. GLASTONBURY.

Divers other Grants of Lands, Revenues, Liberties, etc., were made to this Monastery by several Kings and Bishops in the times of the Saxons, etc. King Etheldred, Anno 987, granted to the Abbot and Monks here certain Lands to hold and possess, quamdiu fides in Anglorum catholica premanserit plebe. So long as the Catholick Faith shall remain among the People of Engand; or, while the People, there, shall remain Catholicks.

Page 31. ROCHESTER.

IN the year 1197. Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury, exchanged the Mannor and Church of Darent to the Monks of St. Andrew at Rochester, for the Mannor and Church of Lammedbe (Lambeth) with all the Appurtenances thereto belonging, as well in the said Mannor as in Suwerc (Southwark). And this was by the assent of King Richard the I and Gilbert then Bishop of Rochester.

Page 49. DURHAM.

KING William the Conqueror commanded the men of Carlile, and those Parts, that they should receive Christianity of the Bishop of Durham and his Archdeacon. Nigellus de Albeney a great Favourite to King Henry the I. spoil'd the Monastery of Durham of two Mannors, but being afterwards very sick and weak, repented and restored them. Hugh Bishop of Durham was highly favour'd by King Richard the I who made him Earl of Northumberland, and committed the Government of the Realm to his care during his absence in his Voyage to the Holy Land, but afterwards falling into the King's displeasure he was devested of the Earldom of Northumberland before his death, which happen'd in the year 1194. Anthony Beck elected Bishop of Durham in the year 1283. was a man of so great Authority, that he usually had in his retinue one hundred and forty Knights. He had a grant of the Isle of Man for life; he was a great Builder; he died, Anno 1310. and was the first Bishop that was buried in the Church of Durham.

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 231

Page 62. WESTMINSTER.

IN the year 1556. Cardinal Pole, then Archbishop of Canterbury and Legat de Latere, upon the Petition of the Dean and Chapter of St. Peter's at Westminster, granted them License to give and surrender all and singular their Goods, moveable and immoveable, Actions, and Rights, whatsoever, to their Church, or to them in right of their Church, belonging, to King Philip and Queen Mary, that with the same they might endow the Abbot and Convent of the said Church in perpetual Alms, and restore it to the condition of a Monastery as formerly. Which License was dated at his Mannor of Croydon, 17th. Kal. October, in the second year of the Pontificate of Pope Paul the IV. (which was 3. 4. P. and M.)

Page 143. BARDNEY.

THE Monastery of St. Peter and St. Oswald at Bardney was re-edified and made an Abby by Gilbert de Gant, whose Off-spring confirm'd and augmented the Lands and Endowments of the same. From the said Gilbert de Gaunt, who came into England with the Conqueror, descended the Earls of Lincoln of that name, Hugh Bishop of Lincoln recited and confirm'd the several Donations made to this Monastery.

Page 152. EVESHAM.

THE first and principal Founder of this Monastery was King Ethelred Son of Penda King of Mercia. Which King Ethelred after he had reigned thirty years, relinquisht his Kingdom, and became a Monk at Bardney. Of later years several of the name of Bushell were Benefactors to this House.

Page 169. CROWLAND.

LAngtoft was given to this House, Anno 819. And the Mannor and Church of Baston, Anno 825. the first by Fregistus, the other by Algarus, two Knights.

Page 176. DEREHAM.

SAint Wythburga the Virgin was Daughter of Anna (King of the East-Angels) and devoted to a Monastick Life. She caused this Monastery to be built at Derham, in which she lived a Nun; this House was at first so poor, that upon her earnest Prayer, the Nuns here were supported by a kind of miracle, two Does or Hinds, being used to come daily to be milked at a certain place for a long time, till the Chief man or Bayly of the Town envying, hunted them away with Hounds, but suffer'd God's judgment for his malice and broke his neck in hunting. St. Wythburg died

292 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II.

and was buried in the Church-yard at Derham; and five and fifty years after her Body was found uncorrupted, and translated thence into the Church, Anno 798. But in the year 974. it was translated from Durham, to Ely.

Page 191. WINCHCUMBE.

ANno 1175. Pope Alexander the III. recited and confirm'd the Lands and Possessions of this House, and by the same Bull granted the Abbot and Monks here divers Priviledges, viz., that they might present Priests of their own Election to the Bishop to be instituted in the Churches belonging to their Monastery, which Priests were to answer to the Bishop for the Cure, and to the Monastery for the Temporalities of the place; that no one should exact Tithes of them for their Lands or Cattle, in their own hands or Occupation; that they might have free Sepulture for those who desired to be buried with them, saving the Rights and Dues of the Parish Churches: that they might cellebrate Divine Offices in time of a general Interdict, with a low Voice, and Doors shut, etc. That Chrisme and holy Oyl, Consecration of their Church, Ordination of their Monks and Clerks to Sacred Orders, should be received from none but their Diocesan Bishop, if he be Catholick and in the Communion of the Apostolick See, and if he will do his Office freely and willingly, otherwise they might repair for these matters to any other Bishop. Anno 1404; Richard Bishop of Worcester confirm'd the Appropriation of their Churches.

Anno 5. R. 1. Robert the IV. was chosen Abbot of this House; he ordain'd, that on every Morrow of All Souls (November 3.) yearly, one hundred poor People should be relieved, here, with Bread, Drink, and Meat. 30. H 3. John Tanworth was chosen Abbot on the death of Henry. 9. E. 2. Richard Tdeburi was chosen Abbot on the death of Thomas. 4. E. 3. Robert de Ippewell then Abbot did freely and of his own accord, Abdicate the said Office, and Walter Winsort was chosen to succeed him.

Page 191. WILTON.

WUlstan Earl of Ellendin was the first Founder of the Chantry at Wilton (which is the same with Ellendin). King Egbert founded the Priory, at the request of Elburga his Sister and Widow of the foresaid Earl Wulstan, Anno 773. In which she became a Nun with twelve others. But the first Founder of the Abby or Monastery of St. Edith in Wilton was King Alrud, who gave all his Mannor and Liberties at Wilton to the Nuns, in perpetual Alms. King Athelstan was a great Benefactor, Anno 933, and 937. So was King Edgar, Anno 968, etc.

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 233

Page 195. AMBRESBURY.

THE Nuns here, being about thirty in number, were for their notorious scandal and naughty Life, removed from hence, and placed in other Monasteries, and other Nuns brought from Font Ebrald in France and establisht here; to whom King Henry the II. upon their first establishment, gave divers Lands; all which, with other Revenues given by other Benefactors were confirm'd to the said Nuns of Font Ebrald by King John, in the second year of his Reign.

Page 242. RAMSEY.

IN the year 1100. several Great men of this Kingdom raised a War against King Henry the I. who were forced to fly into Normandy; Guiscard de Lywosin, Lord Molyns appeared there on the King's behalf, and prosecuted the War against them, for which service he was highly favoured by the King who brought him with him over into England, and gave him Castles, Lands, and Honours. This Norman Lord built that part of Ramsey Monastery which was call'd Norman's Isle. And from him descend the Lords Molins. Roger a younger Son of this Family was Castellan of Nottingham, and call'd himself Roger de Leumesin {anglice Waterhouse).

Page 253. CHATERIDGE.

THIS Nunnery and Church were all burnt down by a casual fire in the time of Robert Orford (who was Bishop of Ely, Anno 1302.) whereupon the said Bishop wrote to the Bishop of London setting forth the distrest Condition of the Abbess and Nuns here, in order to have them excused from the Payment of Tenths in consideration of their great Loss.

Page 276. BURTON.

NIgellus Abbot of Burton with the Consent of the Chapter there, gave to one Orme their Land at Acovre, under condition that he pay yearly twenty pieces of old Coyn, each worth 16d. (xx. oras) and thereupon the said Orme became the Abbot's man, and swore fealty, and that when dead his Body should be brought (cum tota pecunia sua) to be buried at Burton Abby; after which his Son was to appear in their Chapter-house, to pay his Relief, to take such Oath, to make such Payments, and to hold as his Father had done. By other Deeds this Tenure was specified to be by the Payment of two Marks yearly at Martlemass, to go with the Abbot to London when he goes thither on the Affairs of this House, at the Abbot's Charge, and come to his Court, if summon'd, to judge Felons.

234 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II.

Page 310. SPALDING.

THIS Monastery was given in the time of William the Conqueror to the Abby of St. Nicholas at Angiers, by one Yvo Talboys, and became a Cell to that Abby. But it being found highly inconvenient to the good of this House that the Prior and other principal Officers here should come from beyond Sea, and be removeable at the pleasure of the Abbot of Angiers, they carrying away with them what they could get from this place; after many contests it was agreed that the Prior of this House should be instituted by the Diocesan, and be immoveable; and that the Abbot of St. Nicholas at Angiers should not have to do with any of the Temporalities of this House, but only receive an annual Rent of 40 l. and the Board and Maintenance of four Monks.

Page 352. MERKYATE.

ANno 1145. Radulph, Dean of St. Paul's in London, and the Chapter of that Church, granted to Christina, and the Nuns of the Monastery of the holy Trinity of the Wood near Merkyate, the Ground where the said Monastery is situated, reserving a yearly Payment of 3s. as a Ground Rent, and Fealty. Alexander Bishop of Lincoln consecrated the Nuns Church here in the abovesaid year 1145.

Page 356. TUTBURY.

William Earl of Ferrars granted to the Monks of St. Mary of Tutbury, the Tithes of all his Forrest of Duffeld, viz. of Paunage, of hunting of Honey, and of Money (i.e., Rents). William Prior, and the Convent, of Tutbury, granted to William Fitz-Herbert and to his Heirs, Norbury in Fee, at the yearly Rent of 100s. and if he be summon'd to assist or be present at the Pleas and Affairs of the Church of Tutbury, with Relief, and other Services to the said Prior and Convent. Afterwards by Deed dated 10. H. 6. Nicholas Fitz-Herbert, Esq., and Ralph Fitz-Herbert his Son and Heir apparent, set forth that whereas they had demised to Thomas Gedney Prior of Tutbury certain Lands at Osmondstone in Com. Derby, for four years; in consideration that the Prior and Convent had by their Deed under seal released to the said Nicholas and his Heirs all their Right and Claim of a Rent of 5 l. per Annum, and other Services issuing out of the Mannor of Norbury in the said County, they the said Nicholas and Ralph did release to the said Prior, and Convent, and their Successors for ever all their Right and Claim to and in the Lands demised as abovesaid, with Warranty.

Page 367. MALVERN.

THE Priory of Great Malvern was before the Conquest a Hermitage founded by one Urso d'Abytot; afterwards a certain Abbot of Westminster, with the Assent of the said Urso, did place here a Prior and Monks, and gave them three Mannors; others gave other Lands, all which were confirm'd by King Henry the I.

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 235

Page 370. St. NEOTS.

TEdbald de Eschalers gave Lands to the Monks here, whose Deed concludes - Et quoniam ego Sigillum non habui, petitione mea Dominus meus Stephanus hanc donacionem meam sub Sigillo suo confirmavit. Other Benefactors to this House were Roger de Clare Earl of Hertford, William de Albiney Brito, and Peter de Montefort, which last by his Deed dated at Preston, Anno 1245. gave and confirm'd to the Monks here divers Lands in Wenge (Com. Rut.) with the Advowson of the Church there.

Page 439. COLNE.

SEveral Countesses of Oxford were Benefactors to the Monks here. Roger Bigot Earl of Norfolk gave them the Church of Dovercourt and Chappel of Herewich.

Page 479. BLAKEBERGH.

TO the Nuns of this House divers of the Family of Scales were great Benefactors. Emma de Bellofago Widow, gave to the Nuns of Blakebergh four hundred Eels out of her Fishery at Wilton, per Annum, at the beginning of Lent, in pure and perpetual Alms.

Page 489. STANFORD.

TO the Nuns of St. Michaels in Stanford were given by several Benefactors, the Church of St. Clement's in Stanford, the Church of All-Saints in Stamford, the Church of St. Andrew in Stanford then (1170) held by Peter the Dean, who was to enjoy it during his Life. Also the Church of St. Martin at Stamford, of which last mention'd Church it was certified by Oliver Bishop of Lincol, Anno 1289. that the Vicarage of the said Church did consist in the whole Altarage of the same, the Vicar paying yearly to the said Nuns two Marks, that the Nuns should be at the Charge of supplying the Chappel of Burgele in the said Parish, that the Vicar should pay the Sinodals only, but the Nuns the Archdeacons Procurations, and all other Charges. They had also given them the Church of Corby and Chappel of Upton. William Earl of Waren granted them a Rent of 40s. per Annum, for their Kitchin.

Page 496. DENNY.

RObert the Chamberlain Earl of Richmond, gave divers Lands to the Monks here, exhorting and commanding his Children to do more for the advantage of this Church, and cursing any one of his Heirs who shall take away any thing that he hath given. These Monks were first

236 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II.

founded in an Isle call'd Elmeney, but for the inconveniences of that Scituation, translated to a higher Ground, in the Isle of Denney, by Albericus Picot.

Page 518. GODSTOW.

AMong other Benefactors to this House were Osbert Fitz-Hugh, who gave a Salt-pit in Wiche. So did Walter de Clifford for the health of his Soul, and of Margaret his Wife, and Rosamund his Daughter, whose Bodies were buried in this Nunnery; dedicated to St. Mary and St. John Baptist.

Page 529. COLCHESTER.

HUgh Abbot and the Convent of Monks of St. John Baptist of Colchester, granted and quit claim'd the Church of Hecham to the Nuns of Littlechirche in Kent, in exchange for Duniland; this exchange was confirm'd by King Steven, and also by Walter Bishop of Rochester, who with the consent of Amphelisa then Prioress of Lilchurch establisht a Settlement for the Vicar of the said Church. Pope Alexander granted an Indulgence of forty days to all those who should contribute to the new building of the Church of St. Mary of Hegham (the same with Lilchurch).

Page 534. KYNGTON.

AMong other Benefactors, Roger de Mortuomari gave to the Nuns of St. Mary of Kington, in pure and perpetual Alms, the whole Tith of his House, of Bread, and Ale (de pane & allece). Roger de Villiers gave them the second Tithes (secundas decimas) of the Corn of all his Demesnes, and the Tithes of his meat or flesh Provision not bought in (decimas Carnis meae non emptae). Robert Burnell Bishop of Bath and Wells gave them the Advowson of the Church of Kyngton, belonging to that See.

Page 544. HOLAND.

THE Colledge here dedicated to Thomas the Martyr, was at first founded for Secular Canons, but in the year 1318. it was by the Patron Sir Robert de Holland Knt. translated into a Priory of Benedictine Monks. Upon the death of whose Prior the Monks were to choose three, out of whom he was to elect one to be by him presented to the Diocesan to be Prior.

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 237

COLCHESTER, in Essex.

ON the South side of Colchester is a small hill, on the North side of which was of old time the habitation of one Siricus a Priest, and a Church composed of Boards and dedicated to St. John the Evangelist, wherein in the night time was often seen wonderful light, and musick heard praising God, no body being then in the place. This Church being famed for this and the like miraculous adventures, and being also of a delicious Scituation, Eudo the Kings Major Domo, or Steward, to whom King William Rufus had given the Custody of the City of Colchester, erected here a Monastery of which he lay'd the first Stone, Anno Dom. 1097. Which being finisht some Monks were brought hither from Rochester. But they not being endow'd here, according to their own mind, return'd to Rochester. After this Eudo received other thirteen Monks from the Abbot of York; these began upon a New Foundation, which prosper'd so well that in a short time, one of the thirteen was chosen Abbot, and Consecrated by Maurice Bishop of London, About the year 1104. Their number increased to above twenty, who all lived very regularly. The founder Eudo dyed in Normandy, and devised his Body to be buried in the Abby of his foundation at Colchester, which was accordingly done, the Monks meeting it a Mile from the Monastery, Anno 1120. This Eudo endow'd this Monastery with several Mannours, Tithes, and Churches, among others with the Church of St. Mary in the Westcheping, Call'd the New-cherch, and his Stone House near the same, also the Church of St. Steven Walebroch, in London. King Henry II. released the Tax of Danegeld, etc., in the Lands of these Monks.

SNAPES in Essex. A Cell to Colchester.

William Martell, being Seised of the Mannour of Snapes enjoy'd Wreck of the Sea from Thorp to Hereford Nesse, and gave this Mannour to the Abby of Colchester for the founding of a Priory here, which Priory was founded accordingly and made a Cell to that Abby, Anno 1155. This Priory paid half a mark yearly to Colchester as a Pension of acknowledgment. Twice a year the Abbot of Colchester was to Visit here, with twelve Horses, and abide here four days.

St. HELENS in Bishopsgatestreet, London.

ALardus Dean of St. Pauls London, and the Chapter of that Church, granted License to William Son of William the Goldsmith, Patron of the Church of St. Helen, to constitute Nuns in the said Church, and erect a College there, endowing them with the Advowson of the said Church; The Prioress to be, upon election, presented to the Dean and Chapter of Pauls, and to swear fealty to them, and to pay them a Pension of half a mark yearly at Easter, etc. In the year 1439. Raynold Kentwode Dean of Pauls made other Constitutions for the Government of this Nunnery; some of which were, That Divine Service be by them duly perform'd night and day; That no secular person be locked within the Bounds of the Cloyster,

238 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II.

nor come within it after the Complin Bell, except Women Servants, and maid Children; that none of the Sisters receive Letters from, or speak with any secular Person without License of the Prioress, and some other Nun to be present; That they grant no Coredy or Pension without License of the said Dean and Chapter, that no Dancing or Reveling be used in the House except at Christmass, and then among thrmselves and in the absence of Secular persons; That there be a Door made to the Nuns Quire that no Strangers may look on them, nor they on the Strangers when They be at Divine service; That no Nun have any Key to the Postern Door that goes out of the Cloyster into the Churchyard, but the Prioress, etc. These Orders were to be Read publickly in their Chappel four times a year, and kept and observed under the pain of Excomunication.

[Valued at 314 l. 2s. 6d. per Annum.]

CATESBY, in Northamptonshire.

King Henry III. in the fifty seventh year of his Reign, recited and confirm'd to the Nuns of Kateby, the Church of the blessed Mary of Kateby with the Chappel of Helidene, with the Church and divers Lands in great Esseby, and several other Revenues given them by divers Benefactors. Confirm'd also by the Bull of Pope Gregory the VIII.

[Valued at 132 l. 1s. 11d. per Annum.]

St. MARY, de Pratis, adjoyning to Derby.

King Henry II. granted and confirm'd to the Nuns of St. Mary de Pratis near Darby among other things, twenty seven acres of Land in his Forrest of the Peak, with large Commons in the said Forrest; King Henry III. granted them 100s. per Annum, to be received from the Baylies of the Town of Nottingham out of the Farm of the said Town.

[Valued at 18 l. 6s. 2d. per Annum.]

GRIMSBY, in Lincolnshire.

THe Church, and all the Monastery of Nuns here, being of the Kings Foundation and Patronage, together with all their goods and Movables and all their Writings and Evidences concerning their Lands and Estate in Lincolnshire and Yorkshire, being burnt and consumed by a casual fire, King Henry IV. in the seventh year of his Reign, confirm'd to this Prioress and Convent all their Grants, etc., made as well by his Progenitors as others.

NEWTON, in Yorkshire.

KIng Edward II. in the fifteen year of his Reign granted his Licence To his well beloved Cousin Thomas Wake to give one Messuage with the appurtenances in the Town of Neutone for the erection of a Religious

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 259

House of what order he pleased, and to endow it with Lands in Neuton and Cottingham, etc. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 88.

BROMHALE

HEnry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln and Margaret his Wife, did release and quit claim to the Nuns of Bromhale one hundred acres of Land in their Wast of Asserige with the Appurtenances.

Page 551. LEUESHAM, in Kent.

KIng Alured, and his Son King Edward the Elder, gave, and King William the Confessor confirm'd, to the Abby of St. Peters at Gant, the Mannour of Luesham, with all its appurtenences, viz. Greenwic, Wullewic, Medingham, and Cumbe, with other Lands and great Liberties and Franchises, as large as the King himself had in the said Lands, etc. Dated Anno Dom. 1044.

Page 551. St. MICHAELS MOUNT, in Cornwall.

RIchard King of the Romans, Edmund Earl of Cornwall and Conan Duke of Britany, were Benefactors to this House. Pope Adrian in the year 1155. confirm'd to the Abbot and Monks of this House, by the name of the Monastery of St. Michael de periculo maris, all their Lands and Revenues, lying most in Normandy, and also in England.

Page 558. BERGAVENNY.

HEnry de Bellocampo confirm'd to the Monks of Bergavenny all those Possessions which his Ancestors, Hamelinus de Balon, and others, Lords of Bergavenny, had given them, and further gave and confirm'd to the said Monks divers other Revenues.

Page 595. GOLDCLIVE.

RObert de Candos founded the Priory at Goldclive in Wales, being then Lord of Karlyon; The Patronage of which House came afterwards to William Earl of Gloucester, and after that to Richard Duke of York.

CARESBROKE in the Isle of Wight.

WIlliam Fitz Osbern was Mareshal to William the I. and Conquer'd the Ile of Wight at such time as the other Conquer'd England; King William made him Earl of Hereford. The Estate of this William descended to Baldwin Earl of Exeter who granted all the Churches and

240 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II.

Tithes of this Iland to the Abby of St. Mary of Lira. King Henry II. recited and confirm'd the several Possessions given to those Monks as well in France, as England, and Wales.

Page 614. WENDLOCK.

WIlliam de Boterell and Isabella de Say his Wife, gave the Church of St. George of Clune to the Monks of St. Milburge at Wendloke.

Page 614. DUDLEY.

THe Church and Monastery of St. James at Dudley was founded and endow'd by Gervaise Paganel, or Painel, who granted that in whatsoever Pastures his own Cattle fed, there also the Cattel of the Monks of Dudley, might freely feed, except in his Parks; with tithe of his Bread, hunting,and fishing, while he remains at Dudley. Anno 1290. Roger Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield granted a Remission of forty days penance to those who being truly contrite and confest, should say the Lords Prayer and Salutation of the Blessed Virgin, for the Soul of Roger de Somery buried in the Conventual Church of Dudley, and for the Souls of all the Faithful deceas'd.

Page 619. LEWIS.

TO this House did belong divers Lands, Churches and Tithes in Devonshire, Sussex, Surrey, Kent, and Norfolk, the several Names of which, and of the Benefactors who gave them may be seen in the Book at large.

Page 636. BROMHOLME.

KIng Edward II. granted to the Monks here the Mannour of Blaketen to hold in fee farm at the yearly Rent of twenty pound, which Mannour did formerly belong to Edmund Earl of Kent.

Page 668. MONTEACUTE.

THis Monastery was founded by William Earl of Moriton, near the Castle of Monteacute for Monks of Cluny; and to it he gave the Burgh and Castle of Montacute, and the Chappel in the Castle, together with many other Mannours, Lands, Churches, Tiths, Fairs and Hundreds.

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 241

Page 687. TICKFORD.

GErvasus Paganell gave and confirm'd to the Monks of the Church of the blessed Mary at Newport, divers Lands and Revenues given them by his Ancestors, and by other men which held of his Fee, Anno 1187. These Monks of Newport (the same with Tickford) were here as a Cell to St. Martins call'd Majus Monasterium, or Marmonstier, in France.

Page 704. WAVERLEY.

POpe Eugenius the III. by his Bull dated at Paris. 1147. granted to the Monks of this House and their Successors, inter alia, that no Tithes should be by any exacted of them for their Lands or Cattel in their own hands or occupation.

Page 768. CUMBERMERE.

BAldwin and Hubert successive Archbishops of Canterbury confirm'd to these Monks and their Successors several Churches and Chappels to them given, among the rest, that of Namptwiche.

Page 782. BILDWAS.

FOunded by Roger Bishop of Coventry. Hugh Bishop of Coventry gave these Monks an Inn in Litchfield for their Reception when they came thither. William Fitz-Alan gave them the Town of Little Bildewas, with other Lands. Henry Abbot of this House granted to Hamon de Benthale, in consideration that his Mother was burden'd with many Children, and at her instance, a certain Allowance and stipen'd in this Monastery for Term of his Life, which afterwards, 11. E. 2. in consideration of a Sum of Money in hand paid to him, by John then Abbot, the said Hamon did Release and Quit-claim. Anno 1287. Henry de Lacy Earl of Lincoln and Constable of Chester confirm'd an exchange made between the Monks of this House, an those of Crokesden, viz., of Caldon-Grange in Com. Stafford (being of his Fee) for certain Lands in Edwyneye in Com. Salop.

Page 801. NEWMINSTER.

THE first and principal Founder of this Abby was the Lord Ralph de Merley, from whom descended two Sisters who became Co-heirs to the Barony of Merley; Mary, married to William Baron of Graystok, and Isabella, married to the Lord Robert de Somervill; all whose descendants were great Benefactors to this House, so also were the Bertrams Barons de Mitford, with divers others. Ralph Baron of Graystok who died, Anno 1483. was also Baron of Wemme. George Dacre Lord of Gillesland and Graystok died young and untimely, by the accidental fall of a Wooden Vaulting-Horse, Anno 1569. he being then in Wardship with the Duke of Norfolk.

242 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II

Page 866. DORE.

ROger de Clifford gave his Body to God and the blessed Mary, and the Monks of Dore, to be buried in the Church of Dore, and with his body he gave them certain Land, nomine Dotis.

Page 285. BLANCLAND.

PAganus de Cadurcis Son and Heir of the Lady Hawisia de London, gave to the Cistercian Monks of Albaland nineteen Acres of arable Land, that every Priest of the said House should daily in the Canon of the Mass make special commemoration for the Souls of such and such of his Family, pro vivis inter Vivos & pro defunctis inter mortuos. Whose Deed bears date Anno 1270.

Page 892. DEULACRES.

ROger de Menilwarin gave to the Monks of this House, for the Health of the Soul of Ranulph Earl of Chester and Lincoln, his Mothers Brother, in pure and perpetual Alms, free Common in his Wood of Pevere, Hause-bote and Hay-bote, with Paunage for fifty Hogs.

Page 893. CLUNOCK-VAUR.

FOunded and endow'd by one Gwithno. King Cadwalader, and divers Welch Lords gave large Possessions to this Abby, dedicated to God and St. Beyno.

Page 916. ROBERTSBRIG.

ALice Countess of Eu, Daughter of William Earl of Arundell and of Qeeen Alizia, gave Lands to this Abby in pure and perpetual Alms, ad hospitalitatem sustentandam, for the maintenance of Hospitality. Which Lands were confirm'd to them by William the third Earl of Sussex her Brothers Son, and by John de Augo her Son.

Page 926. BEAULIEU.

KING John gave out of his Treasury one hundred Mark for the building this Abby in Newforest, and directed his Letters to all Abbots of the Cistercian Order, to be helpful to the re-edifying of the same out of their several Stocks.

VOL. II. Additions to the First Volume. 243

Page 936. VALE-ROYAL.

PRince Edward Son of King Henry the III. being in great danger of drowning at Sea, as he return'd from the Holy Land, vow'd in case he and his came safe to Land, to erect a new Monastery in honour of God's blessed Mother Mary, in some proper place in England, and endow the same with sufficient maintenance for one hundred Cistercian Monks. Which Monastery being afterwards built and by him named Vale Royal, a Convent was translated thither from the Abby of Dore. In the year 1277 the said Edward being then King of England, laid the first Stone of a new Building in the place design'd for the great Altar, and after his example, all the prime Nobility of the Land did the like in honour of our Lord Christ, the Virgin Mary, and the Holy Confessors St. Nicholas, and Nichasius. Their first Habitation was but small, yet there they remain'd for the time of four Abbots, till in the year 1330. the Convent was translated to a new Monastery, on the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin. The place where this Monastery was situated was before call'd Munechene wro, in Latin Monachorum silua, Munchene in old English signifying a Monk or Nun, and Wro a Wood. 'Tis said that many years before this Monastery was founded, in that place, Shepherds and Country People did usually on the Solemn Feasts of the Virgin, about Midnight hear Celestial Musick, and see such wonderful brightness as seem'd to turn the night into day. The Royal Founder brought with him from the Holy Land a piece of our Saviour's Cross, which he gave to this Monastery. Queen Elianor his Wife was a bountiful Benefactress, so that not only at all Masses here, but at all Canonical hours the Monks of this House did use a special Collect for this King and Queen, and at Grace after-meat, the President did use to say, Anime Regis Edwardi, Reginae Alianorae, & omnium fidelium defunctorum per misericordiam dei requiescant in pace, to which they all answer'd, Amen. At the Solemn Consecration, and Benediction of this House by the Patriarch of Jerusalem, Anthony Beck Bishop of Durham, with several other Bishops, a Sentence of the greater Excommunication was solemnly denounced against anyone who should enter into this Monastery any other ways than by the Gates of the same. The first Abbot of Vale-Royal was John Chaumpneys, 2. Walter de Hereford, 3. John de Oo, or Hoo, this man was so highly favour'd by the King, that he often bid him ask what he would and he would grant it, who thereupon desired the King to give him leave to resign his Office, which tho' the King was by no means willing to grant, yet at last he obtain'd after much importunity. He was a very meek and companionate man; always considering and bearing in mind this Distich,

Peccantes dampmre cave, nam labimur omnes;
Aut fumus, aut fuimus, aut possumus esse quod hic est.

The fourth Abbot was Richard de Ewesham, a holy Man, reported to have done Miracles. Great Sums of Mony were allow'd by the King for the Building of the new Work of this Abby,and in the Parliament at Acton-Burnel (11. E. 1.) the Abbot of Vale-Royal was ordered to receive yearly for the carrying on the said Work one thousand pound, partly out of the Wardrobe and partly out of the Profits of the County of Chester. It appear'd

244 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. II.

by the Accounts of the Kings Treasurer that he paid for the new Work of the Vale-Royal, in all, thirty two thouaand pounds aterling.

MARHAM, in Norfolk.

ISabella de Albany Countess of Arundel, Daughter of William Earl of Warren, and Widow of Hugh Earl of Arundel, founded and endow'd this House for Cistercian Nuns. This Nunnery was incorporated Anno 1252.

Page 966. KINGSTON upon Hull.

KING Edward the III. in the one and fiftieth year of his Reign, reciting that he had granted License to William de la Pole Sen. to found and endow an Hospital of Chaplains and poor People at Kingston upon Hull, and that the said William was afterwards minded to change the said Hospital into a Nunnery, granted his License to Michael de la Pole Son and Heir of the said William, to establish there instead of the said Nuns, thirteen Carthusian Monks, thirteen poor Men, and thirteen poor Women, and to endow them with twenty Acres, and 20 l. Rent held of the King, and with other Revenues not held of the King to the value of two hundred Marks per Annum.

The Abby de Loco Dei.

WIlliam Longspee Earl of Salisbury, by his Will dated, Anno 1255. gave to the building and establishing of this House for Carthusians, besides Land, and Church Utinsils, one thousand Ewes, three hundred Muttons, forty nine Oxen, and twenty Bulls, etc.

VOL. II Additions to the Second Volume. 245

Page 49. HAGHMON.

KING Henry the II. at the desire of Alured Abbot of Haghmon, granted the Custody of that Abby, in times of Vacation, to William Fitz-Alan and his heirs. Anno 3. H. 5. Ralph then Abbot of this House and his Convent, at the instance of Thomas Earl of Arundel and Surrey, granted to Robert Lee one Corrody for his Life, he being with the said Abbot as his Squire with a Boy and two Horses, to have Meat and Drink for himself, Boy, and Horses, as others of the Abbots Squires for the times past used to have, during such time as the said Robert shall please to abide in the said Monastery, so also for Apparel. In the Reign of Henry the VI. Thomas Holden Esq., granted to the Prior of the holy Trinity at London and his Successors, in behalf of the whole Order of Canons Regular, one Messuage and Garden, in the Parish of St. Peter, and St. Michael, near the North Gate in Oxford for a Colledge for those of that Order to study in. Richard Bishop of Coventry granted to this Monastery of Haghmon that the Sacristan under the Abbot, might baptize as well Jews, as Children, in the Monastery, and might use parochial Rights within the same. Nicholas Abbot of this House, in the year 1332. allotted certain Revenues for the maintenance of the Kitchin, and for twenty Hogs yearly for the Bacon of the House, etc. Richard Burnell Abbot, in the year 1459. made certain Ordinances relating to the Offices of the Prior and Sub-prior, whereby he settled their Precedencies, etc. Pope Alexander the III. granted to the Canons of this House divers Priviledges; as not to pay Tithes of the Lands and Cattel of their own Possession; to have a free Buryal place, (libera Sepultura); to present Clerks to the Parochial Churches which they hold, who shall account to the House for the Profits; to celebrate the Divine Offices privately in the time of a general Interdict; to pay no Tithes of their Mills and Meadows, unless the usage hath been otherwise, etc. Pope Boniface IX. granted Indulgences to those who should visit this Church on certain days yearly, being truly penitent and confest.

Page 56. WYRKSOPE.

THIS House was founded on the 3d. of March, in the third year of King Henry, third Son of William the Conqueror, by Sir William Lovetot who lies buried in this Church near the High Altar, from whom descended by Heirs General the Lords Furnival, and the Talbots Earls of Shrewsbury.

246 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. II.

Page 86. St. MARY-OVERIE, in Southwark.

RIchard Bishop of Winchester confirm'd to the Canons of St. Mary of Suwerch, the several Churches and Possessions given them by their Benefactors.

Page 143. RANTON.

HUbert Archbishop of Canterbury confirm'd the Grants of Robert Noel, and Thomas Noel his Son, to the Canons of this House. By Composition between the Abbot of Haghmon, and the Prior of Ronton, it was agreed, that the Prior and Canons of Ronton should be call'd to the Election of the Abbot of Haghmon when it should happen; that the Abbot of H. should visit at Ronton once a year, or oftener if occasion be; that the Prior of Ronton may admit a Canon or Brother into his House at R. without the consent of the Abbot of H. first askt, so long as he makes his profession to the Abbot of H. and lastly that upon the Election of a Prior of Ranton, the Canons of R. shall elect one of the Canons of Haghmon, and one of their own House out of which two the Abbot of H. shall make choice of one to be the Prior at R. The Priory of Ronton paid to the Abby of Haghmon a yearly Pension of 100s. Vid. Vol. 3. p. 53.

Page 144. LILLESHULL.

THis Church dedicated to St. Alcmund was in old time of high Veneration. AEdelfleda Queen of Mercia is said to have founded it, but it was much enrich'd by King Edgar, who descended of the same Lineage with the said Alcmund. Gilbert de Cunedore indeavouring to defraud these Canons of one of their Prebends he was excommunicated, till at last he was prevaild with to restore the Prebend, and to do penance, receiving from every Canon of this Church a Publick Discipline and Correction. In the time of Roger Bishop of Coventry, and Pope Eugenius, the Secular Canons, or Prebendaries, were changed to Regular Canons, Anno Dom. 1405. the Canons of this House obtain'd of the Popes Nuntio in England, the Appropriation of the Parish-Church of Hulme; their Petition setting forth that they could make no advantage of their Rents and Possessions by reason of the Wars with Wales; and by reason of their scituation on the High-way call'd Watlingstreet, they were impoverisht by the continual conflux of Guests and Travellers, who eat up their Provision, etc.

VOL. II. Additions to the Second Volume. 247

Page 564. KNIGHTS TEMPLERS.

ANno Dom. 1319. Walter Archbishop of Canterbury, having received the Popes Bull directed to all Archbishops, and Bishops, setting forth that since the Suppression of this Order divers of the Knights had lived like Lay men, and married Wives contrary to their Vow, which was not discharg'd by the Council of Vienna at such time when it supprest the Order, he commanded therefore that the Brethren of that Order should be admonished that within the space of three Months they should enter themselves into some Religious House, there to live in God's service during their Lives, under pain of losing the Stipends which had been assign'd them at the Suppression of their Houses; in pursuance of this Bull the said Walter Archbishop of Canterbury directed his Letters to the Prior of Christ-Church, London, for the Reception of Roger Stowe a Priest of the Templers, into that Priory, which was accordingly perform'd. In the following year the same Pope sent his Bull to the said Archbishop of Canterbury whereby he order'd Excommunication against all those who should withhold any Lands, Houses, Churches, Revenues, or Goods moveable or immoveable formerly belonging to the Templers, from the Master and Brethren of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, on whom the said Possessions had been conferr'd, and united for ever, by Pope Clement the V. in the Council of Vienna.

248 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

French Monasteries.

RObert Abbot of Molesme in Burgundy was the first Institutor of the Cistercians (a Reform of the Benedictines) to whom Odo Son of Henry Duke of Burgundy gave the place call'd Cistertius which gave name to the Order. This order encreased so fast that from the year 1098. to the year 1151. almost 500. Abbies were erected for them. Much about the same time that this Order of Cistercians began in the Diocess of Chalons in Burgundy, the Carthusians began their order in the Diocess of Grenoble: They observe their offices both by night and day according to the Rules of St. Benedict.

St. GEORGE of Bauquerville, in Normandy.

RAlf de Tancerville gave divers Lands to this Abby, both in Normandy and England, confirm'd to them by William his Son, Chamberlain to King Henry II. among whose Lands in England, was Edyweston lying within the Bounds of the Forrest of Rutland; which Lands, King Henry II. granted License to these Monks to convert into tillage, and conferr'd divers Liberties on them.

BEC, in Normandy.

FIrst founded in a Place call'd Burneville, by Gilbert Earl of Brionne, a great Souldier, and Nephew of Richard the first, Duke of Normandy, who at the age of forty years became a Monk here, Priest, and then Abbot of this Monastery. The habitation of these Monks was afterwards removed into a vally near a River call'd Bec. King Henry II. confirm'd their Lands and Possessions, several of which lay in England, at Athelstone in Warwickshire, Islip in Oxfordshire with divers others places in other Countries.

BELBEC, in Normandy.

THe Lands and Possessions of this House were confirm'd by King John, and after him by King Henry V. who also confirm'd to the Abbot and Convent of this House the grant formerly made to them by Blanch Queen of France of forty pound Parisian mony, per Annum, for the maintenance of one Mass there daily, and supporting some other Charges, for ever.

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 249

St. EVENS at Caen, in Normandy.

FOunded by King William (the Conqueror) King of England, and Prince of Normandy and Main, and by him largely endow'd with Lands both in Normandy and England. Several others of the Nobility of Normandy were Benefactors to this House, all whose gifts were confirm'd by King Henry I.

The HOLY TRINITY, at Caen in Normandy.

KIng William II. and King Henry I. gave to the Nuns of this Abby divers Lands and Liberties in England. Confirm'd by King Edward II. in his seventeenth year.

St. VIGOR at Cerify, in Normandy.

FOunded in a Place then call'd Ciriciac, Anno Dom. 1032. by Robert Earl of the Normans, who also endow'd this Abby with Possessions adjoyning round about it. William Duke of the Normans, Son of the Said Robert, gave many other Lands; The Like did others of Principal quality. Confirm'd by King Henry I. Anno Dom. 1120.

CORMEL, in Normandy.

POpe Alexander III. by his Bull dated 1168. confirm'd the Possessions of this House, granting them a free Sepulture of their own, to pay no Tithes of their proper Cattle, to celebrate privately in time of a general Interdict, etc. King Henry II. confirm'd divers Lands given them in England.

St. DENNIS, near Paris.

ANno Dom. 792. Bertoaldus, a Duke among the English Saxons, being afflicted with a Distemper which the Phisitians could not cure, travail'd into France to the Abby of St. Dennis, and there found, through the mercy of God, a perfect Recovery. Hereupon he gave to that Abby his Town of Ridrefeld in Sussex, with other profits; Confirm'd to these Monks by King Offa, then Reigning. King Edward the Confessor gave them other Lands in Oxfordshire, Anno Dom. 1059. William Earl of Ferrers granted them yearly one wax Candle or Torch, price thirteen pence, one fat Buck, and one fat Boar, to be sent them by proper Messengers on the Feast of St. Dennis, in perpetual Almes, whose Deed of grant bears date Anno Dom. 1189.

250 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

St. EBRULF at Utica, in Normandy.

TO this Abby, built by St. Ebrulf a Confessor, in a Desert and Solitary place, King William the Conqueror gave Lands in several Counties of England, Anno Dom. 1081. Also Robert Earl of Leicester, and Robert his Son were Benefactors.

LESSAY, in Normandy.

KIng Henry II. and after him King Henry V. confirm'd to this Abby (lying in the Town of St. Oportune) their Lands as well in England, as Normandy, given by divers Benefactors, among whom Robert de Haia, Roger Foliot, etc.

FISCAMPE, in Normandy.

WIlliam, Patron of the Normans, and King of the English, confirm'd to this Abby all its Possessions in England and Normandy with the grant of Liberties, in like manner as his Predecessor Richard Earl of the Normans had given them.

St. FLORENCE at Saumers in Anjou.

KIng Henry II. confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby their Possessions, among others their Cell of Sele in Suffolk.

FONTANE, in Normandy.

FOunded by Ralf Taxo, and by him endow'd with large Lands and Possessions, with the good will of William Prince of the Normans (qui Regnum Angliae armis subjugavit, & strenue gubernavit) which King William the Conqueror confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby four Churches with all their Tithes and Customes in England, among which Toucester in Northamptonshire.

FONTEBRALD, in Normandy.

KIng Henry II. granted to the Nuns of this Abby the Mannour of Lecton in Bedfordshire, with other Lands amounting to 60 l. per Anno with the Confirmation of a yearly Alms out of the Exchequer of 24 l. per Annum, granted by his Grandfather King Henry I. King Henry III. confirm'd to these Nuns all their Lands, etc. in England.

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 251

FULCARDIMONT.

Alice Countes of EU (Augum) confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby the several Lands given them in England by John Earl of Eu, her Grand-father.

JUMIEGES, in Normandy.

KING Henry the II. confirm'd the Lands given to these Monks by William Son of Rollo, Robert Archbishop of Rhoan, King William, etc.

GOISLAFONTAN.

FOunded and endow'd for Nuns by Hugo de Gornaio, and others.

GRANDIMONT, in Normandy.

KING Henry the V. Anno suo 8. confirm'd to the Prior and Convent of this place all the Lands granted by his Progenitors Kings of France and England. Robert Earl of Mellent was the Founder, and many the Benefactors. King Henry the II. granted them an annual Rent of 200 l. in free Alms, confirm'd by King John.

GRESTAIN, in Normandy.

KING Richard the I. confirm'd to the Monks of this House, their Lands given by King William the Conqueror and others. The like did King Edward the II.

LIRA, in Normandy.

KING Henry the II. confirm'd to the Monks their Lands and Cells in England. The Earls of Leicester were great Benefactors to this House, so were divers others of prime quality in England.

LONLEY, in le Maine.

FOunded in the Chatellery of Danfront, and Diocess of Mans, by William de Belefino, and endowed with Revenues in and about Dumfront in Normandy.

252 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

St. MARTIN of the Major-Monastery (Marmonstier), in Tourain.

KING Henry the II. granted to the Monks of this place divers Lands and Tithes in England.

St. JOHN's in Poictou.

KING John confirm'd to the Monks here the Church of St. Nicholas.

MONTISBURG, in Normandy.

THE Estate of these Monks in England, given by Richard de Rivers and others, was confirm'd by King Hen. II. and King Edw. 3.

NOA, in Normandy.

FOunded by Maud the Empress, Daughter of King Henry the I. for Monks.

St. MARTIN S, in the Suburbs of Paris.

STeven Earl of Albamarl, and Havisia his Wife Daughter of Ralph de Mortuomari, were Benefactors to the Monks here.

St. REMIGIUS, in the City of Reims.

KING Edward the III. Anno suo 6. confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby divers Lands in England.

DE PRATO, at Rhoan.

FOunded by King Henry the I. and by him and Maud the Empress endow'd with Lands both in Normandy and England.

St. AMAND, at Rhoan.

THE Abby of Nuns here was founded by Goscelinus the Viscount and Emmelina his Wife. Endowed by them and several others, among the rest King William the Conqueror, and Queen Maud,

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 253

SAVIGNY, in Normandy.

KIng Edward III. confirm'd to the Monks of this Abby their Lands in England, among which their Cell of Benyngton in Lincolnshire.

St. MARTINS, at Alcey in Normandy.

FOunded and endow'd by Steven Earl of Albamarl and his Ancestors, without the Walls of the Castle of Albemarl.

St. Nicholas at Angiers.

FIrst founded by Fulk Earl of Anjou, Anno Dom. 1020. whose Son Jeffrey married Maud the Empress, daughter of King Henry I. She granted to the Monks of this Abby, divers Lands and Churches in England, as Spalding in Lincolnshire, etc. See more in Spalding, Vol. I. p. 306.

St. SAVIOURS, at Constantine.

THeir Possessions in England were confirm'd to these Monks by King Henry II. with the grant of great Liberties and Priviledges in his Forrests.

St. MARTINS of Troarne.

THe Possessions of these Monks were confirm'd by Henry Duke of Normandy, and Aquitain, and Earl of Anjou.

St. VICTORS at Calere, in Normandy.

KIng Henry II. Confirm'd the Estate of the Monks of this place, which they had both here and beyond Seas, with the grant of Liberties etc.

St. WALERIC, in Picardy.

KIng Henry II. Confirm'd to the Monks here Takley in Essex, etc., with divers Liberties and great Immunities.

St. WANDRAGISILUS, in the Dioc. of Roan.

FOunded and endow'd at Fontanell by Richard II., Duke or Prince of the Normans, Anno Dom. 1024.

254 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

XANTON, in Aquitain.

KIng John confirmd the Liberties granted to the Nuns of this Abby.

CLUNY, in the Dutchy of Burgundy.

ROger Earl of Salop and Adelina his Wife gave the Mannor of Chelton to this Abby.

AULNAY.

ANno Dom. 1199. William de Similleio, and his Ancestors founded and endow'd this Abby, in the Diocess of Bajeux; for Cistercians. They demised certain Tithes in Oxfordshire for the Rent of 40s. per Annum, Anno 1304.

de BONOPORTU.

FOunded for Cistertian Monks by Richard I. King of England, and endow'd among other things, with one hundred marks yearly issuing out of his Rents in the Town of Dieppe.

St. MARY de Voto, at Cherburg, in Normandy

FOunded and endow'd by King Henry II. and his Mother Maud the Empress, Confirm'd by King Richard I. and King Henry III. for Cistertians.

St. MARTIN, and St. Barbara, in Normandy.

KIng Henry II. confirm'd the Lands given to the Canons of this Abby both in Normandy and England.

BELENCUMBRIS.

WIlliam de Waren and Isabel his Wife gave divers Lands and Rents to this Priory of All Saints, Anno Dom. 1135.

St. WLUAR, at Bologne in Picardy.

King Henry I. at the Solicitation of Ida Countess of Bologne, gave and confirm'd to the Canons of this Priory, Notfeld in Surrey.

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 255

FOUGERES, in Britany.

COnan Duke of Britan gave the Canons of this place the Church of Cestrehunt, in the Diocess of London. Ranulph Earl of Chester writ to the Bishop of London on behalf of these Canons, and because he had not his own Seal by him at that time he sent his Letters under the Seal of the Lady his Mother, yet the Said Letters conclude Teste meipse apud Martillum.

The Hospital of St. Mary Magdalen, at Bologne.

KIng Henry I. confirm'd to this Hospital 10 l. per Annum, arising out of Kent.

The Hospital of Lepers of Kenilli, near Roan.

KIng Henry II. founded this Hospital for Leperous Women, and gave it 200 l. per Annum. King Richard I. gave them 40 l. per Annum. But this was Anjou pounds. The Hospital of Vernon, in Normandy.

FOunded and largely endow'd by St. Lewis King of France, Anno Dom. 1260.

The Hospital of the Holy Ghost at Rome.

FOund by Inquisition 20 Edward III. that King John gave the Church of Wrytele in Essex for the maintenance of the Poor in this Hospital call'd the English Hospital at Rome.

BLANCLAND, in Normandy.

FOunded for Canons, and endow'd with Lands in England by Richard de Hay and his Wife.

De BELLOPORTU, in Normandy.

ANno Dom. 1202. Alen Son of Earl Henry gave divers Lands in England to the Canons Regular of this Abby, Premonstratenses.

256 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

Dominican Nuns, near Roan.

FOunded by St. Lewis King of France, beyond the Bridge at Roan, and by him endowed with 500 l. Turnois, per Annum, and divers Liberties, Anno Dom. 1269.

The Cathedral Church at Roan.

DIvers Lands in England were formerly given to the Canons of this Church and their Successors, by King Henry, Earl Otho, and more especially by King John, viz., The Mannor of Clere in Hampshire, Oteri in Devonshire, Kilburn in Yorkshire, etc.

Irish Monasteries.

St. ANDREWS, in the Territory of Ardes, (Ardee).

FOunded by John de Curceio. At first a Cell to the Abby of Lonley in Normandy, and by them granted to the Archbishop of Armach.

The Nuns, at Corke.

FOund by Inquisition 29. E. 1. that it was not to the Kings damage for William Barry and others, to settle certain Lands there mention'd on Agnes de Hareford and other Nuns and their Successors in the House of St. John Baptist in St. John Street in Cork.

St. PATRICKS at Downe.

FOunded Anno Dom. 1183. for Monks and a Prior from St. Werburgs at Chester, but without any Subjection to the Church of Chester. Tte Bishop of Down was Custos and Abbot of this Monastery, in like manner as the Bishops were in the Churches of Winchester and Coventry. John de Curci the Founder of this Monastery endowed it with divers Revenues, and Tithes, among other things of all his hunting.

The Nuns, at GRANE, in the County Kildare.

POpe Innocent the III. Anno Dom. 1207. coafirm'd the Lands given to this House by Walter de Rideleford and others; the like confirmation was made by King John in the ninth year of his Reign.

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 257

KILCUMYN.

FOunded by Philip de Wigornia, Constable of Ireland, and furnished with Monks from Glastonbury.

NEDDRUM, a Cell to St. Bege, in Yorkshire.

ANno Dom. 1177. (23. H. 2.) the Lord John de Curci subdued Ulster. Anno 1178. he gave Neddrum to the Monks of St. Bege, with great Priviledges. Divers Benefactors gave Lands to this Priory, all which was confirm'd, Anno Dom. 1202. by John Cardinal of St. Steven in Mont Caelius Apostolick Legat.

OCYMILD.

FOunded by William de Burgo, and given to Richard a Monk of Glastonbury.

ARKEL, a Cell to Furnes, in Lancashire.

FOunded by Theobald Walteri, Butler of Ireland, and by him given to the Monks of the Cistlercian Order at Furnes, with divers Liberties.

BELLO BECCO, another Cell to Furnes.

FOunded and endow'd by Walter de Lascy for Cistercian Monks, who afterwards by License of King Edward the III., transferr'd their Estate here to the Abbot and Convent of Furneys.

DUNBROTHY, in the County of Wexford.

HArvey de Monte Marisco, the Kings Marshal of Ireland, gave this place with divers other Lands for a Cell to the Abby of Bildwas in England, William Marshal Earl of Pembroke was a great Benefactor to this House, whose Gifts were confirm'd by King Edward the III. among which things they had a grant of Pasture for eighty Cows, and one thousand five huudred Sheep yearly.

JEREPONT.

FOunded by Dumwald King of Offery, and endow'd by him with Balcochellam in which the Monastery was founded, and other Lands; all confirm'd by John Lord of Ireland and Earl of Morton.

258 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

KYLLECONIL.

FOunded by Donald O Bryan. Confirm'd by King Henry the III. Anno suo, 4.

MELLIFONT.

KING John confirm'd to the Monks of the Church of St. Mary at Drogheda divers Land which they enjoy'd before the coming of the French into Ireland. The like confirmations were made by King Henry the III. and King Edward the III.

NEWRY, in the County of Down.

FOunded and endowed for Cistercian Monks by Mauritius mag Lochlain King of all Ireland, by the unanimous consent of the Great men and Petty Kings of Ulster.

ROSGLAS.

FOunded and endow'd by Dermitius Demesy, King of Osalia.

St. SAVIOURS.

FOunded by William Marischal Earl of Pembroke, confirm'd by King Henry the III. with the grant of great Liberties. To this Abby was afterwards united the Abby of Kilkenny.

TYNTERNE.

FOunded according to the last Will of William Marischal Earl of Pembroke, and ratified by King John.

DE VALLE SALUTIS.

FOundedby Dermitius an Irish King, and by him and his Subjects endow'd with divers Lands. Confirm'd by King John.

WONEY, in the County of Limerick.

FOunded Anno Dow. 1205. and endowed with Lands and Liberties by Theobald Walteri, Butler of Ireland.

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 259

St. CROSSE in the County of Tiperary.

FOunded and endowed by Donald King of Lumney (Lumnecensis).

BALLINTOBBER, in the County of Maio. Canons Regular.

FOunded by Cutholus O Conogher King of Connaught, Anno Dom. 1216.

CONNAL, a Cell to Lanthony, in England.

FOunded Anno 1202. by Maylerus Son of Henry, for Canons Regular. Confirm'd by King John.

The Hospital of St. Mary's near Drogheda.

FOunded and endowed by Ursus de Swemele, for the maintenance of poor and infirm People and such as are in Want; The Custos of which Hospital to be chosen by the Good men (Proborum hominum) of Drogheda.

ALL-SAINTS, in the East-part of Dublin.

FOunded and endowed for Canons by Dermont King of Leimster, confirm'd by King Henry the II.

St. THOMAS the Martyr, in Dublin.

FOunded and endowed by William Son of Audelinus, Sewer to King Henry the II. by Authourity of that King, and for him.

FERNE, in the County of Wexford.

FOunded and endowed by Dernatius King of Leimster, Anno 1158. He also granted them free choice of their own Abbots, according to the Rule of St. Augustine.

KENLIS, and Inistiock, in the County of Kilkenny.

Jeffrey Son of Robert came into Ireland with William Earl Marischal, and obtain'd the Barony of Kenlis in Offorey, at which place he afterwards built a Monastery for Canons Regular, which he brought over from Bodmin in Cormvall. One of whom was Hugh de Rous, who after that became the first

260 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

English Bishop of Offery. About Anno 1206. Thomas Son of Anthony founded a Priory at Inistiock, which became as a Cell to Kenlis. Hugh de Lacy and Walter de Lacy were Benefactors.

The Hospital of St. John Evangelist at Kilkenny.

FOunded and endowed Anno 1220. by William Mareschal Earl of Pembroke.

KILVAYNARD, a Priory of Augustin Nuns.

POpe Celestin the III. Anno 1195 confirmed their Lands and Possessions with the grant of divers Liberties.

St. JONN BAPTIST at Nenath, in the County of Tiperary.

FOunded about the year 1200. by Theobald Walter Burler of Ireland, and by him endow'd with Lands for the Maintenance of Canons, and thirteen poor and infirm People.

FERMOY.

FOunded and endowed for Canons Regular of St. Augustin. by Alexander Son of Hugh. Confirm'd by King Edward the I. Anno suo, 18.

TOBERGLORIE, in the County of Down.

FOunded and endowed by John de Curcey, and by him given as a Cell to the Prior and Canons of St. Mary at Carlile.

TRISTERNAGH, in the County of Neath.

FOunded and endowed about the year 1200. by Jeffrey de Constantine, for Canons Regular.

The Cathedral Church of the Trinity, at Dublin.

STitrius King of Dublin gave the Ground where this Church now stands to Donatus the first Bishop of Dublin, for the erecting of a Church to the Holy Trinity, with Revenues. Which Donatus in his time built the Nave and side Isles. Many years after, Laurence the second Archbishop of Dublin, and Richard Strigul, and the Earl Marshal, etc., added the Quire, Bells, and two Chappels. After Laurence; Henry, and Luke, two other Archbishops, carried on the Building, and after them, John de S. Paul finisht all. King John was a Benefactor to this Church, while Earl of Morton, and after he was King.

VOL. II. FOREIGN MONASTERIES. 261

Scotch Monasteries.

COLDINGHAM, a Cell to Durham.

SAint Ebba Sister of Oswy King of Northumberland was the first Institutor of a Religious Life in this Place, here she had a Monastery consisting of both Sexes, under her Government. King Edward the III. in the first year of his Reign granted his Letters of Protection for this Priory.

LINDORS.

FOunded by David Earl of Huntington, Brother of the King of Scotland, and by him endowed with divers Churches.

ABERBROTHE.

FOunded by William King of Scotland in honour of God and St. Thomas the Archbishop and Martyr, and by him endowed with Lands and Liberties.

DRYBRUGHE.

FOunded and endowed by David King of Scotland, for Canons; with the grant of divers Liberties and Immunities.

DUMFERMLINGE.

FOunded by Malcolm King of Scotland (in monte Infirmorum) and by him and others endowed with large Possessions. Confirm'd by King David the first, youngest Son of King Malcolm and Margaret his Wife.

BELMERINACH, in Fife.

FOunded and endowed by Alexander King of Scotland, in honour of God, St. Mary, and the holy King Edward for Cistercian Monks.

262 FOREIGN MONASTERIES. VOL. II.

Of the Cistercian Monasteries in Scotland.

SAint David Son of Malcolm and Margaret founded Six of this Order. Henry Prince of Scotland Son of the said David founded Hadington. St. Malcolm Son of the said Henry founded three. Willium King of Scotland founded one. Others of the Nobility founded many others, viz., Patrick Dunbar Earl of March, and Agatha his Wife founded Coldstream in the Marshes. The Earl of Fife founded Northberwick where a peice of our Lord's Cross was preserved with great Veneration. John Lord of Kirconell founded Sacrum-Boscum, commonly call'd Holywood; of this House, it is said, was the famous John de Sacro bosco, who writ of the Sphere and other Astronomical matters, etc.

The End of the Second Volume.

MONASTICON
ANGLICANUM,
ABRIDGED.

VOL III.

OF THE
CATHEDRAL and
COLLEGIATE
CHURCHES.

VOL. III. 265

MONASTICON ANGLICANUM,

Abridged.

VOL. III. and last.

Additions to the First Volume.

Page 31. ROCHESTER.

GUnaulphus Bishop of Rochester, by authority, will, and command of King William, and by the advice, help, and assent of Lanfranc Atchbishop of Canterbury, did institute sixty Monks in the Room of five Clerks (all that then were) in the Church of St. Andrew the Apostle; and transferr'd the possessions formerly given by divers Benefactors to that Church, to the mamtenance of those Monks, with other endowments of his own guift, for the maintenance of them. Strangers that should come there, and poor people, and for Serjeants to serve them. He also made Provision for a Festival on St. Andrews day, for himself and Successors, if they should be present at the Celebration of the same. Whose Charter bears date the twentieth day of September 1089.

Boniface Archbishop of Canterbury, recited the Grant of Anselm his Predecessor by which he granted and confirm'd divers Lands given to this Church by Bishop Gundalf and others, in Kent, Surrey, Suffolk, Buckinghamshire, and Gloucestershire, dated at London in a Council of Bishops A.D. 1101. And the said Anselms Confirmation of Archbishop Lanfranc's Grant to the said Church, dated 1087. and confirm'd all the said recited Grants by his Deed of Confirmation dated 1254.

King Henry II. confirm'd all their Lands and Possessions, with large Priviledges and immunities such as the Church of Canterbury enjoys, whose Charter bears date at Nottingham.

Anno Dom. 1197, An Exchange was made by consent of King Richard I. between Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury and the Prior and Convent of Rochester, the said Prior and Convent granting to the said Archbishop and Successors their Mannour of Lambeth with the Church there, and the Liberties and appurtenances thereunto belonging as well in Southwark as in the Soke of London, except a Mill which the Monks have upon the Thames over against the Tower of London, etc. And the said Archbishop gave in Exchange to the said Monks the Mannour of Darent, etc., with mutual Warranty on both sides, and a restriction that it shall not be lawful for the said Archbishop or his Successors ever to alienate the Said Mannour of Lambeth from the Archbishoprick, or for the said Monks to alienate the Mannour of Darent, etc.

266 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. III.

Page 413. NORWICH.

John Archbishop of Canterbury at the request of the Prior and Convent of the Cathedral Church of Norwich, exemplified the Charter of Herbert Bishop of Norwich, by which he gave to the Monks, whom he had estabisht in the said Cathedral Church, divers Lands, Tithes, and other Revenues; and of Anselm Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of the Greater Britain and Ireland, and Vicar of Pope Pascal, by which he confirm'd the Establishment of the Monks which the said Herbert had made in the said Church of the Holy Trinity at Norwich, which Church King William, and King Henry his Brother and Successor had constituted to be the head and Mother of all the Churches of Norfolk and Suffolk The foresaid Deed of Exemplification bears date at Lambeth, Anno Dom. 1281.

Radulphus Fitz Godric gave to this Church the Mannour of Neuton confirm'd to the Monks by King Henry I.

Page 120. GLOCESTER.

ANno Dom. 1138. King Steven in the third year of his Reign confirm'd to the Church St. Peter of Gloucester, all the Lands, Churches, Tithes, and other donations given by Divers Benefactors.

Page 395. St. MARYS at York.

IVo de Taleboyse, from whom descended the Noble families of the Rosses Lords of Werke, Faucumberge, Twenge, and Belewe, etc., gave to the Church of St. Mary in York and to the Abbot and Monks there, divers Lands and Churches. This Ivo de Tailbois held of the King in Capite the Barony of Hephall, which Barony was held by his Ancestors in Thenagio, paying to the King 50s. yearly, but King William the Conqueror changed the Tenure into the Service of one Knights Fee.

Page 258. WHERWELL.

POpe Gregory the IXth. recited and confirm'd to the Abbess and Nuns of Wherwell all their Lands, Tithes and Churches, that they then had, or for the future should obtain, and exempted them from Tithes for their own Cattel, with priviledge to receive and retain in their Monastery such secular Women as are free and at their own disposal, to celebrate Divine Service privately in the time of general Interdict, to have a free Sepulture, and a free Election of their Abbess etc. Whose Bull bears date, Anno Dom. 1228.

Page 327. WALLINGFORD.

NIgellus de Albeney and Alan Fitz-Amfrid give divers Lands to the Monks of St. Albans in the Church of the Holy Trinity of Wallingford,

VOL. III. Additions to the First Volume. 267

Confirmed to them by Joceline Bishop of Salisbury, and after him by Robert Bishop of Salisbury, and by the Dean and Chapter of that Church, Anno Dom. 1243.

Page 525. WILBERFOSS.

GEorge Duke of Clarence and Lord of Richmond, as Patron of the Nunnery of Wilberfoss, exemplified and confirm'd to Elizabeth then Prioress, and to the Nuns there, the several Deeds of Endowments and Grants made to them by Jordanus Fitz Gilbert, William de Percy, etc. Whose Deed of Confirmation bears date at Stamford 10th. of August, 4. Edward IV.

Page 487. STODELEY.

THis Nunnery was first founded by Thomas de Sancto Walerico, but his Estate, and consequently the Patronage of this House, coming to the Crown, King Richard II. in the first year of his Reign, on the death or Margery the last Prioress, confirm'd the Election of Elizabeth Fremantell then Subprioress into the Office of Prioress, and signified the same to the Bishop of Lincoln.

Page 481. SANFORD alias LITTLEMORE.

ROger de Thoeni, Roger de Sanford, and Thomas Buscel (whose Deed bears date 1254, 8. Henry III.) gave Lands to the Church of St. Nicholas and Priory of Nuns here. Robert Abbot of Abington and Benjamin Rector of the Church of St. Nicholas granted and confirm'd to them certain Tithes. Roger de Quency Earl of Winton, and Constable of Scotland released to them their Suit to his Court. Pope Innocent IV. in the second year of his Pontificate Released ten days of enjoyn'd Pennance to all such of the Diocesses of Lincoln, Ely, and Salisbury, who being penitent and confest, should contribute and assist to the reedifying of the Church of this Priory.

Page 597. GROSMUNT, in Yorkshire.

JOan Wife of Robert de Torneham, and daughter of William Fossart, gave divers Lands, Profits, and Priviledges in Yorkshire, to the Prior and Monks of Grandmont in France, confirm'd by her said Husband Robert de Torneham, who also gave other Lands of his own.

Page 505. CRESWELL in Herefordshire.

THis was another Cell of the Monks of Grandemont, to which Walter de Lacy gave Lands in pure and perpetual Alms, with warranty. Peter Bishop of Hereford having bought Lands of the Prior of Creswell, for 550. marks granted by his Deed dated 1256, that in case he or his Successors

268 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. III.

should happen to be impleaded for the said Lands, the said Prior nor this Successors should not be obliged to defend and Warrant the same beyond the Sum of 550 marks.

Page 542. MISSENDEN.

JOan de Pedinton widow of Guy de Ryhal, with Thomas Son and heir of the said Guy, confirm'd to the Canons of Missendin, the Hermitage of Muswell, which Ralf the Hermit built and inhabited by permission of the foresaid Guy, with a Chappel built in honour of the Holy Cross. Confirm'd also by Albricus Earl of Damarun, and Simon de Gerardmulin.

The Priory of EWENNY, a Cell of the Abby of Gloucester.

THe Turbervilles gave to the Church of St. Michael and the Monks there, divers Lands and Possessions, with Liberty of fishing in the River of Ewenny as far as their Lands extend, and to retain a moiety of the fish so caught, the other moiety to be the Turbervilles.

The Priory of Blithe, in Nottinghamshire.

POpe Honorius confirm'd the Possessions of this House to the Monks here, and exempted them from paying of Tithes of their Cattel. It was founded by William de Crescy.

William Gifford Archbishop of York, Anno Dom. 1277, made certain orders for their Government, viz., That Almes and Hospitality should be used as of old time. That all and singular do humbly and devoutly obey the Prior as their head, etc. Vid. Vol. 1. p. 553.

BUSTLESHAM Abby, in Barkshire.

King Henry VIII. by Patent dated in the 29th. year of his Reign, recites that out of the sincere and intire devotion which he bears to God and the Blessed Virgin Mary, and to the Increase of the Divine Worship, etc. He does erect, found, and establish to indure for all future times, a Monastery or Conventual House of one Abbot and thirteen Monks of the order of St. Benedict, in the place of the late disolved Priory or Monastery of Bisham alias Bustlesham in Barkshire, which on the fifth day of July in the 28th. year of his Reign was surrender'd to him by William Bishop of St. Davids, then Prior of that Priory and the Convent there, and this he did for the good estate of himself while living, and for the good of his Soul after death, and for the good of the Soul of his most dear Wife Jane late Queen of England deceased, and for the Souls of his Children, and Progenitors. And gave all the Lands, Houses, Church, Bells, and all utensils then in his hands and formerly belonging to the late dissolved Monastery, to John Cordrey, whom he made Abbot of this new Monastery and to the Monks of the same. Which John Cordrey was lately Abbot of the

VOL. III. Additions to the First Volume. 269

Monastery of St. Peter at Chertsey in Surrey. He did also incorporate this new Monastery by the name of the Abbot and Convent of the new Monastery or the Holy Trinity of King Henry VIII. at Bustlesham, with power to purchase Lands, and by that name to sue and be sued. etc., and for the Abbot and his Successors to use an Episcopil Miter. He also endow'd the said New Monastery with all the Lands and Revenues belonging to the late Monastery here, and also to that of Chertsey, in divers Counties of England and Wales, and in the City of London, also with the dissolved Priories of Cardigan in Southwales, and Bethelkellard in Carnarvanshire, with all the Lands and Revenues of the same, and with divers Rents issuing out of the Lands and Revenues of several other Monasteries, then in Lease for twenty one years, and the Reversion of the said Lands, etc. With view of Frank pledge and all other Franchises and Liberties which have been formerly enjoy'd in the several Lands etc. To hold by the Service of one Knights fee, and the yearly Rent of 72 l. and 17d. in the name of a Tenth, to be paid into the Court of augmentations at Michaelmas. This new Monastery to be exempt from the ordinary Jurisdiction, and to be visited only by the King his heirs and Successors, and the present Abbot John Cordrey to be excused from the payment of first Fruits and Tenths given by Statute, made in the twenty sixth year of this King, provided notwithstanding that his Successors shall pay first Fruits which are valued at 661 l. 14s. 9d. ob. But no tenths, which amount to 66 l. 3s. 5d. ob. q. non obstante the said Stat. or any other Law. Which Patent bears teste at Westminster 18th. December in the foresaid twenty ninth year of Henry VIII.

Page 648. LENTON.

KIng Steven granted the Church of the Holy Trinity at Lenton, which William Peverell and others had endow'd, to the order of Cluniac Monks to be enjoy'd with all its possessions, inviolably.

The Priory of HORKESLEY.

RObert Fitz Godebold give divers Lands, Churches, and Tithes to the Cluniac Monks of Tefford, with intention that the Convent of that House should transmit some of their Monks to the Church of St. Peter at Horchesley there to reside in the Service of God and St. Peter. Their Possessions so given was confirm'd to them by Gilbert Bishop of London, and Hubert Archbishop of Canterbury.

Page 867. SIBETON.

With King William the Conqueror, who came into England in the year 1066. came Walter de Cadamo, who after the Conquest held the Barony of Horsford. He had issue Robert who built the Church of St. Peter at Sibton, who had issue John call'd the Vicount, and William. John being very infirm in his health vow'd to erect an Abby of Cistercian

270 Additions to the First Volume. VOL. III.

Monks; but himself dying, left his vow to be perform'd by William his Brother and heir, who enjoy'd after his death his Barony and Vicounty. This William founded the Monastery of St. Mary at Sibton in the Reign of King Steven, Anno Dom. 1149. And endow'd the same with Lands and Revenues. He had issue Margaret married to Hugh de Cressy who confirm'd her Fathers Guift.

Anno 28. Henry VIII., William then Abbot at Sibton Com. Suffolk, and the Convent there, of their free will and unanimous Consent, gave, granted, and confirm'd to Thomas Duke of Norfolk, Anthony Rouse Esquire, and Nicholas Hare, Gent, their heirs and assigns to the use of the said Duke his heirs and assigns for ever, all the said Monastery, and Estate thereunto belonging, and Constituted Thomas Heydon, and Robert Whinwery their lawful Attorneys to deliver Seizin accordingly. This was under their Convent Seal, and Sign'd by the Abbot, and seven Monks of the House.

Page 887. HOLMCOLTRAM.

DAvid King of Scotland confirm'd the Donations of his Son Henry, to this Abby; the like did afterwards Malcolm King of Scotland Son of the said Henry.

John King of England in the 16th. year of his Reign, granted to the Monks here the Hermitage of St. Hilda in the Forrest of Englewode, with all the Land which Roger Croky late Hermit held, and a Vaccary there for forty Cows, etc. John Bishop of Carlile licensed the Monks of Holmcoltram to build a Church or Chappel in their territory of Arlosk for their Tenants and the Inhabitants of those parts, which Church or Chappel he did appropriate and annex to the said Monastery, and exempt the same from the Visitation of the Ordinary; The said Church to be served by a secular Priest of their election, but to be presented to the said Bishop or his Successors, and by them admitted to the said Cure. The said Priest so admitted to receive for his support 4 l. to be pay'd him yearly out of the profits of the said Church, and a House and Curtilage to be assigned him. The said Priest to pay to the Bishop in the name of a Cathedratic, half a mark, and to the Archdeacon when he Visits 40d. for procurations. Which Deed of Appropriation bears date at Linstock, Anno 1304. Hugh Morville, Cecily Countess of Albemarl, Lambert de Multon, and others, were Benefactors to these Monks. William Earl of Albemarl gave them a Forge and Iron Mine at Egremond; Robert King of Scots (whose Father lies buried in their Church at Holmcotram) gave them a yearly farm of 10 l. Pope Lucius III. confirm'd to them their Lands and Revenues, and granted them divers Liberties, as to be free from the payment of Tithes for their Cattel, and Fishing, etc. Whose Bull bears date Anno 1185.

Page 914. CROKESDEN.

THe Abby of the Vally of St. Mary of Crokesdene was founded by Bertram de Verdon, and by him endow'd with divers Revenues in Crokesdene, Stanfort, Castretone, etc., and a Salt work in Midlewich.

VOL. III. 271

Additions to the Second Volume.

Page 461. NORWICH. 45,

John Bishop of Norwich exemplified the Deeds belonging to the Hospital of St. Paul in Norwich, viz., the Charter of the Convent of the Holy Trinity of Norwich (who founded and endow'd the said Hospital to the support of poor people, for the Soul of Bishop Herbert, etc.), of Adam de Bellosago, Morellus de Morley, some Bishops of Norwich his Predicessors, and King Henry I. who were all Benefactors. Which Deed of Exemplification bears date in the year 1301.

Page 181. TWINEHAM.

IN the Reign of King Steven, Anno Dom. 1150. Henry Bishop of Winchester, and Hillary then Dean of Christ Church, at the Petition of Earl Baldwin, introduced Canons Regular into the said Church, in place of the Canons secular that then were there, the secular Canons to enjoy their Prebends while they lived; But all the Lands and Revenues belonging and possest by the said Church in the time of the Deans to be for the future to the only use of the Prior and Canons Regular.

Page 152. GISBURNE.

WAldenus Son of Earl Cospatric gave the Town of Apleton to the Church of St. Bridget, commonly call'd Brydekirk, in the County of Cumberland. The Lady Alice de Rumeley gave this Church of Brydekirk, with Apleton, and all other Lands thereunto belonging to the Canons of Gisburne.

Page 172. WORSPRING.

WIlliam de Curtenai founded a Convent for Canons Regular of St. Augustin, at the Chappcl of St. Thomas the Martyr in Worspring, and notifying so much to John then Bishop of Bath, desired that by his authority the Church of Worle, at that time vacant, might be appropriated to the said Convent.

Page 263. WORMLEY.

JOhn de Baskerville gave to God and the Church of St. Leonard of Pyonia, and to the Prior and Canons there, in Frankalmoine, all his Land of Stanley

272 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. III.

which he held of the Mannour of Wormley; and Nicholas de Wormley Lord of the said Mannour, reciting the said Grant, confirm'd' the same to the said Prior and Canons, and also released and quit claimed to them, one pair of spurs or sixpence of yearly Rent, by which the foresaid John held that Land.

Robert de Staunton, Gilbert Talebot, Robert Boter, and others, were Benefactors to the said Canons, confirm'd by Roger de Montuomari Lord of Winfretone Anno Dom. 1304. Gerald de Eylesford gave them the Advowson of the Church of Pyona Regis, or Kings Perrne; Peter Bishop of Hereford appropriated the Church of Wormesley, of which these Canons were Patrons to this Convent, for the said Canons to enjoy the Fruits thereof to their proper use, but so as not to defraud the said Church of due Service. Whose Deed bears date, Anno 1262. Here was a Chantry founded by the Lady Basilia de Bourhull.

Page 941. RANTON.

RObert Fitz-Noel, or Son of Noel, founded and endow'd the Priory of Ranton, for Canons under the Rule and obedience of the Church of Haman (Hamanensis Ecclesiae) Whose Donation was confirm'd by Thomas Noel his Son. Noel who came into England with King William the Conqueror, had issue Robert, and he Thomas. Thomas had issue Alice and Joan, his Co-heirs. Alice was married to William de Harecourt, and had in partition the Mannour of Elinhale, from whom descended Sir Robert Harecourt Knight, who married Anne the daughter of Thomas Lymerik.

Page 276. COLD NORTON, in Oxfordshire.

WIlliam Fitz-Alan founded this Priory for Canons in his Mannour House at Coldnorton, to God, St. Mary, St. John, and St. Giles, and endow'd it with divers Lands. Reginald Earl of Bolon, and Ida his Wife confirm'd the Donations of their Ancestors, Anno 1201. Ralf Earl of Stafford, gave to this Priory his Mannour of Rowlandright in Oxfordshire, for the maintenance of two Canons to celebrate for his Soul, etc., for ever, whose Charter indented bears date at his Mannour of Tyshe in Warwickshire, 44. Edward III. Hugh Croft Esquire released and convey'd over to King Henry VII. all his right, title, and Claim, to the said Priory, and Patronage of the same, and all the Lands and Revenues thereunto belonging, formerly enjoy'd by John Wotton late Prior of the said Priory, whose Deed bears date 21. Feb. 22. Henry VII.

It was found by Inquisition taken at Dorchester in Oxfordshire 24. of Apr, 22. Henry VII. before William Young Escheater of that County, that John Wotton late Prior of this Priory, was seized of the said Priory, the Mannour of Coldnorton, and divers Lands, etc., in the said Inquisition exprest, in right of the said Priory, and being so seized dyed on the eve of Palm Sunday in the 11th. year of that King without having any Convent of Canons, or any profest Canon in the said Priory at that time, and that the succession of

Vol. III. Additions to the Second Volume. 273

the said Priory did thereupon wholly finish, dissolve, extinguish and determine by which means the said Priory and all the Eslate thereunto belonging did Escheat to the King whose Ancestors were Founders and Patrons of the same, and that the Revenue of the said Priory is of the value of 50 l. per Annum, over and above all Reprises.

Page 232. DERLEY.

ANno 1271. Robert Saucheverel paid a fine before John de Reygate, the Kings Judiciary, of the Church of Bolton, to the Abbot of Derley, saving the Presentation of a fit Chaplain to the same by the said Robert, and that such Chaplain shall receive the small Tithes of Bolton, for serving the Cure.

Robert Fitz-Steven the Kings Chamberlain, Henry de Luy, Hubert Fitz-Ralf, William Peverel of Nottingham, Robert Earl of Ferrars, etc., were Benefactors. Walter Bishop of Coventry confirm'd the Lands given to the Canons of this House, gave them the Care of the Nunnery of Virgins, which the Abbot of Darby erected at a mile distance, and exempted the said Abbot and his Successors from paying Tithes of their proper fields, and granted that the said Abbot and his Successors shall be Dean of all their Churches in Derbyshire, especially of all the Churches in Derby.

Page 41. BREDON.

William de Ferrariis Earl of Derby gave to the Canons Regular of Bredon, divers Churches, Lands, and Commons of Pasture in the Peke and elsewhere.

Page 564. TEMPLERS.

THomas de Santford gave all his Land of Saunjord, etc., to the Knights of the Temple, in pure and perpetual Alms, for the releif of the holy Land, and for the maintenance of one Chaplain to celebrate Mass for ever, at the House of the Templers at Bustlisham. King Steven and Queen Matilda his Wife, and William Marescal Earl of Pembroke were Benefactors. William de Vernon granted Lands at Eremne for the founding of an Hospital, to William Maskerel, which foundation was confirmd by Baldwin, Archbishop of Canterbury, and Godfrey Bishop of Winchester, and was afterwards granted by the said Maskerel to the Knights of the Temple of Salomon.

STANLEY Priory, in Gloucestershire.

THeobald Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of the English, and Apostolick Legate, confirm'd the Lands and Revenues given by Several Benefactors to the Church of St. Leonard and Canons of Stanley.

274 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. III.

SHELFORD Priory, in Nottinghamshire.

IT was found in a Plea of Assize taken before Hugh Bigod Justiciary of England, Anno 42. Henry III. Between William Bardolf, and Adam Everingham, who both pretended to the Patronage of this Priory, that Ralf Haunselyn Ancestor of the said William Bardolf was the founder of the said Priory, and that William Bardolf was the true Patron of the same, who thereupon had Judgment against the said Adam, and the said Adam in misericordia. And the Archbishop of York was commanded to admit a fit Person to be Prior there at the Presentation of the said William.

[Valued at 116 l. per Annum.]

SANDELFORD Priory, in Barkshire.

STeven Archbishop of Canterbury, Primate of all England, and Cardinal of the holy Roman Church, confirm'd to the Canons of Sandelford divers Lands and Rents granted to those Canons by Jeffrey Earl of Le Perche (Pertici) in France.

ASSERUGG, in Buckinghamshire.

EDmund Earl of Cornwal, Son and heir of Richard King of the Romans, gave and confirm'd to the Rector of the Good men Brothers of the Church founded in honour of the precious blood of Jesus Christ at Esserugg, the Mannour of Esserugg and other Lands, etc., for the support of twenty Brothers, Clerks, of which 13 at the least to be Priests, and with those Lands he granted divers Liberties, and Franchises extream large, and that neither he nor his heirs should meddle nor interpose in the concerns of the House at such times as it shall happen to be void of a Rector, etc.

[Valued at 416 l. 16s. 4d. per Annum.]

Page 145. BRADSOLE.

KIng John confirm'd to God and the Church of St. Radegund at Bradsole, and the Canons there of the Order of Premonstratenses, divers Lands given by his Brother King Richard and others; With other Lands of his own guift. He also granted them the Church of St. Peter of Rivery and his House there, for the building a new Monastery for their use, and to translate the old Abby thither. There was formerly in this neighbourhood a small House of Religion call'd Blakewose, which was subject to a Monastery of this order call'd Lavendene, but the Canons of that place being poor and distant, it occasion'd scandal, whereupon the Canons of Blakewose were discharged of their obedience to the Abbot of Lavendene and Subjected to the Abbot of St. Randegund. Hugo de Burgh, Justiciary of England, and Hamon de Crevequer were Benefactors to this Abby.

VOL. III. Additions to the Second Volume. 275

Page 622. STANLEY.

HUbert Fitz-Ralf, and Serlo de Grendon, confirm'd to the Canons of Stanley Park, the Estate formerly given by William de Grendon. Maud de Salicosa Mara, daughter of William Fitz-Ralf late Steward of Normandy was also a Benefactress to this House.

The Abbots of Stanley Park.

1. Walter de Senteney, ruled 31 years. 2. William. Ruled here 2. years. 3. John Grauncorth, govern'd 19. years. 4. Hugh de Lincoln, govern'd 14 years. 5. Simon, 5. years. 6. Laurence, 16. years. 7. Richard de Normanton, ruled the first time 8. years. 8. John de Lincoln, 6. years. 9. Richard de Normanton, the second time. Ruled 1. year. 10. John Horsley, 26. years. 11. John Wodhouse, 15. weeks. 12. William Horsley, 21. years. 13. Roger de Kyrkton, 3. years. 14. William de Boney, 42. years. 15. Henry Monyasche, 39. years. 16. John Spondone, 33. years. 17. John Stanley, 22. years. 18. Richard de Nottingham, 19. years.

Page 605. CROXTON.

AVicia de Romely Lady of Bescaudeby was married to William Paynel who came into England with William the Conqueror, and of whose guift he had divers Towns in Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, and Leicestershire, which William and Avice, had issue a daughter named Alice (or Avice) whom King H. II. gave in Marriage to Robert de Gant, who had issue by her another Alice (or Avice) whom the same King Henry gave in Marriage to Robert Fitz-Harding of Bristol, who had issue Maurice, who dying without issue, his Mothers Inheritance came to Andrew Lutterel, as next of the Bloud of the Pajnells.

Page 607. LEYSTONE.

RAnulfus de Glanville founded the Abby of St. Mary at Leestune and endow'd it with the Mannour of Leestune, which he had of the guift of King Henry II. and with certain Churches, which he had formerly given to the Canons of Buttele, and now by them resign'd to the Canons of this place. King Richard I. confirm'd the Estate so given to these Canons of Leystone with a Grant of divers Franchises, confirm'd also by Richard Archbishop of Canterbury, and by Roger Bygot Earl of Norfolk. Pope Lucius granted these Canons divers Priviledges as not to pay Tithes of their proper Goods and Cattel, to celebrate privately in time of a General Interdict, with absolute freedom in the Election of their Abbot, with Liberty of Burial for any (not Excommunicate) who desire to be buried with them, saving the Rights of those Churches from whence the Bodies come, etc.

276 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. III.

Page 643. BEGEHAM.

William de Burgelle granted certain Marish Lands to the Canons of Otteham (afterwards translated to Begeham) saving to the Lord of the Soil, the Service of half a pound of Pepper, to be paid yearly on the Vigil of Christmass for all Custom and exaction.

DURFORD Abby, in Sussex.

FOunded and endow'd with Lands, etc., by Henry Hosatus Lord of Herting in the County of Sussex; confirmed by King Henry the II. who also granted them a Fair for three days yearly at Herting, viz., on the Nativity of St. John Baptist, and two days next before. Confirm'd also by Hillary, and Seffrid Bishops of Chichester, and by William de Percy, etc.

[Valued at 98 l. 4s. 5d. per Annum.]

STIXWOLD Abby, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry VIII. in the 29th. year of his Reign, out of the sincere Devotion which he had to the Virgin Mary, and for the increase of Virtue, and the Divine Worship, etc., founded a new Monastery of Nuns of the Order of Praemonstratenses, in the place Scite and Precinct of the Old Monastery of Stixwold in Com. Lincoln, lately supprest by Authority of Parliament, to consist of a Prioress and Nuns, there to officiate in the Divine Offices for the good Estate of him and of his most dear Consort Jane Queen of England while they lived, and after their deaths for their Souls, and the Souls of their Children and Progenitors. And made and constituted Mary Missenden Prioress of the said new Monastery, and incorporated the said Prioress and Nuns by the name of the Prioress and Convent of the New Monastery of King Henry the VIII. of Stixwold, with capacity to receive Lands by that name, to sue and be sued, and to have a Common-Seal. He further gave and settled on them, all the Lands, and Estate real and personal belonging to the old Monastery of Stixwold, in as full and ample manner as Helena Key late Prioress of the said Monastery enjoy'd the same on the 4th. of Feb. in the seven and twentieth year of his Reign, or any time before, at which time it came to his hands by reason of an Act of Parliament then past for the dissolving of certain Monasteries. Which said Revenue was then rated at the clear yearly value of 152 l. 10s. 7d. and was granted to the said new Monastery, to hold in Capite by the twentieth part of a Knights Fee, and by the yearly Rent of 15 l. 5s. 1d. to be paid into the Court of Augmentations at Michaelmas, and Lady-day; the Statute of Mortmain, or any other Statute non obstante. Whose Grant bears date on the 9th. of July in the said nine and twentieth year, and is witnessed by Thomas Archbishop of Canterbury, and divers others, among whom Sir Thomas Crumwell Knt. Lord Crumwell Keeper of the Privy-Seal, etc. Vid. I. Vol. 486.

VOL. III. Additions to the Second Volume. 277

Page 376. BRACKLEY.

RObert Earl of Leicester gave to Salomon the Clerk and his Successors one Acre of Land in Brahole (Brackley) in the love of God, and honour of St. John the Apostle and Evangelist, to build a House thereon for the Receipt and Entertainment of poor People. This was confirm'd afterwards by Robert his Son and Heir, which Father and Son endow'd the said Hospital with divers Lands to hold in Frankalmoine. Hugh Bishop of Lincoln confirm'd the Foundation of this Hospital, with all the Lands and Liberties given and conferr'd upon it. The like did King Henry III. in the twelfth year of his Reign.

Page 423. DOVER.

KING Henry the III. in the twelfth year of his Reign, confirm'd to the Hospital of St. Mary at Dover, divers Lands and Rents given by Simon de Wardune; he also confirm'd the Mannor of Rivere to the said Hospital at the Petition of Hubert de Burgo who founded the same for the sustentation of poor People and Travellers who should come thether. He also ordained that upon the death or removal of the Master, the Brothers of the said Hospital shall freely choose another, and present him to the King or his Chief Justice, who shall without difficulty give assent, and then he shall be presented to the Archbishop of Canterbury to be by him instituted. He also granted to the said Hospital the tenth part of the Profits of the Passage in the Port of Dover, besides 10 l. and 50s. which by two Deeds he had formerly granted them. With other Revenues elsewhere.

Page 899. NEWTON.

THomas Archbishop of York made a Decree between Edmund Litchfield, who pretended to the Office of Custos or Master of the Hospital of St. Mary Magdalen at Newton in Holdernesse, and Edmund Percy then in Possession of the said Hospital, containing that the said Percy (whose title the Bishop confirms) and his Successors shall pay to the said Litchfield during his Life a yearly Pension of 100s. on the day of the Annuciation of the Blessed Virgin, in the Collegiate Church of St. Thomas of Acon in London, under pain of incuring the Sentence of Excommunication, if upon request he does not within thirty days perform this Decree, and besides it shall and may be lawful for the said Litchfield on the Possessions of the said Hospital to enter and distrain, and the distress to detain till his said Annuity and the Arrearages and his Expences be fully satisfied. This Decree was made by consent and approbation of both Parties, and bears date in the Archbishops Inn at Westminster (now Whitehall) Anno Dom. 1485. Approved, ratified, and confirm'd by the Dean and Chapter of York, and by the Master, Brothers, and Sisters of the said Hospital, in the same year.

278 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. III.

Page 381. RIPPON.

IT was found by Inquisition taken at Rippon, 10. E. 2. that in the Hospital of St Mary Magdalen there, according to the Foundation, there ought to be two Chaplains daily celebrating; that Strangers, poor Clerks, or other indigent People, coming to the said Hospital in their travells, ought to be lodged there one night, and entertain'd with Victuals, and Bed, and in the Morning depart; and that on St. Mary Magdalen's day yearly ought to be distributed in Alms to every poor Body that comes, one Loaf of the value of a half-penny, the quarter of Wheat being prized at 5s. But they find that the then Custos of this Hospital had perverted the Founders Charity in several particulars.

Page 461. WELLE.

RAlph de Neville, Knt. Lord of Midleham, by Indenture dated Anno 1342. Founded the Hospital at Welle in the Archdeaconry of Richmond, for the Augmentation of Divine Worship, and for the sustentation of poor and miserable People, and other Works of Piety, and endow'd the same with Lands and Revenues, and establisht therein one Master, two Priests, and four and twenty poor and infirm People. And appointed that the Master and two Priests should constantly observe and keep the Canonical hours, and celebrate three Masses daily.

KYPIER Hospital, in the County Palatine of Durham.

FOunded by Ranulphus, Bishop of Durham, Anno 1112. to the honour of God and St. Giles, for the Relief of the Clergy there serving, and for the sustentation of poor People, who also endowed, it with divers Lands and Revenues; confirm'd and augmented by Hugh Bishop of Durham, and other Benefactors. The said Bishop Hugh granted to this Hospital Common of Pasture in his Forrest with certain Priviledges, viz., that the feet of their Dogs should not be cut or clipt, but that the Shepherds might lead them in slips (ligatos) for the safety of their Cattle from wild Beasts and Wolves. Anno 1297. A Composition was made between the Prior and Convent of Durham, and the Hospital of St. Giles, whereby the said Prior and Convent did quit-claim to the Brothers of that Hospital their Tithes of Corn at Clifton, which till that time they had used to pay to the Church of St. Oswald, in recompence whereof the Brothers of the said Hospital were to pay yearly upon the Altar of St. Oswald on the day of that Saint, one Bisantium or 2s. etc. The Men of Bedelyngtonshire being obliged by their Lords the Bishops of Durham, to give to the Hospital of St. Giles without Durham, one Thrave of Corn out of every Plowland which they held, they granted under their Seals, in lieu thereof 9s. in mony, to be paid to the said Hospital at the Feast of St. Michael, with a Nomine paenae.

[Valued at 167 l. 2s. 11d. per Annum.]

VOL. III. Additions to the Second Volume. 279

STOKE Hospital, near Newarke, in Nottinghamshire.

JOhn Chauson, Master of the Hospital of St. Leonard's at Stoke, and others, Confraters of the same, settled, by their Deed dated in the year 1332. forty Acres of Land, and thirty shillings of Rent, which they had obtain'd of Friends, for the profit of the said Hospital, and provided that the Master of the same should cause sixty Masses to be celebrated yearly forever, for the said Benefactors, etc. To this every Master is to be sworn at his admission. This Deed was ratified and confirm'd the same year by William Archbishop of York.

St. GILES Hospital, near Maldon, in Essex.

IT was found by Inquisition taken before Helming Leget, Escheator in the County of Essex, that the Kings of England were Founders of this Hospital, for the support of Leprous Burgesses of Maldon; that they had the Forfeitures of all Bread, Ale, Flesh, and Fish, that was not good and wholesome in the said Town; and that when the Master of that Hospital should cease to take the same for the support as aforesaid, then the said Hospital should come and revert to the King as forfeited; that Robert Manfeild, Clerk, late Provost of Beverley, being made Custos of this Hospital, for above three years part has maintained neither Chaplain nor any Leprous Person in the same, and that the said Hospital was therefore seized into the King's hands. But King Henry the IV. being advised by his Justices and Serjeants at Law that this was no sufficient cause of seizure, directed his writ to the said Escheator to amove his hand, etc., and meddle no further.

GINGES Hospital, in Essex.

MIchael de Capra, and Rose his Wife, and William his Son and Heir, gave to God and the Church of St. Mary and St. Leonard in their Wood of Ginges, and to Toby Prior of the said Place and the Brothers of the same, one Hide of Land, Paunage for forty Hogs, and divers other advantages.

BURGESTRE Hospital, in Oxfordshire.

KING Edward the III. in the nine and twentieth year of his Reign, licensed Nicholas Jordan Hermit, Custos of the Chappel of St. John Baptist of Burcestre, to found an Hospital at Burcestre to the honour of God, the glorious Virgin Mary and St. John Baptist.

[Valued at 147 l. 2s. 10d. per Annum.]

CALC Priory, in Derbyshire.

MAtilda Countess of Chester gave to the Canons of this place, an Estate at Rependone near Trent, conditionally that they should

280 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. III.

make it the head Seat of their Convent to which Calc should be subject as a Member. Hugh Earl of Chester confirm'd their Revenues.

ARUNDELL Hospital, in Sussex.

KING Richard the II. Anno 18. Licensed Richard Earl of Arundel to give four Messuages and two Tofts to the Master and Chaplains of the holy Trinity at Arundell, for the founding of an Hospital call'd Meysondewe in honour of the holy Trinity, etc.

[Valued at 42 l. 3s. 8d. per Annum.]

FOSS-GATE Hospital, at York.

JOhn Archbishop of York, Primate of England, and Legate of tbe Apostolick See, ordain'd and establisht in the Foss-gate-street at York an Hospital in honour of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the blessed Virgin Mary, That there be one Chaplain to have the Government of the same, and to be named Master or Custos, the right of presenting to the Office of Custos to belong to Mr. John de Roucliff and his Heirs, in their default to the Mayor of York for the time being, in his default to the Official of York Court, and in his default that the Archbishop or Dean and Chapter may for that time confer the place without presentation, the Custos on his admission to be sworn to a just and true Administration, etc. That there be constantly resident in the said Hospital thirteen poor and weak Persons, and two poor Clerks teaching Schools, to be chosen by the Custos, every of which to receive from the Custos weekly 4d. of Silver, the Custos to have ten Marks of yearly Revenue, which is judged sufficicnt for his support, that it shall not be lawful for him to convert to his own use more than that Sum of the Goods of the said Hospital, etc. Which Orders are dated at Thorpe near York, Anno Dom. 1373.

[Valued at 6 l. 13s. 4d. per Annum.]

WHITINGTON'S Hospital, at London.

JOhn Coventry, John Carpenter, and William Grove, Executors, of Richard Whitington late Citizen and Mercer of London, and several times Mayor of that City, according to the desire and appointment of the said Richard, founded in the Church of St. Michael Royal at London, where the said Richard and Alice his Consort lye buried, a Colledge of certain Priests and Clerks to celebrate daily for the said Richard and Alice; also an Almshouse for 13 poor People in the Parish of St. Michael aforesaid and adjoyning to the Church, And establisht divers Orders by Licence of King Henry VI. and Henry Archbishop of Canterbury, etc. touching the same; as, that there shall be always inhabiting in the said Hospital 13 poor People of one or both Sexes, of which one to be Cheif, and called Tutor, the first of which Office they placed themselves, by name Robert Chesterton, to whom they gave the said Hospital with all the Appurtenances for a perpetual habitation for him and the poor People and their Successors, by the name of the House of God, or the Almshouse, or the Hospital of Richard Whityngton;

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that the Mayor of London, and his Successors, shall be Supervisers, and the Wardens and Communalty of Mercers, Conservators of the said House; that the Tutor and poor People have Lodgings or Cells apart and several; that within 20 days after the Death of a Tutor the Wardens of the Mercers shall elect or depute another fit person to succeed in the said Office and upon their neglect for 10 days, the Power of so doing shall for that time, be in the Mayor of London; that as the poor People dye, the Master of the foresaid Colledge shall place one in the first Vacancy, and the Wardens of the Mercers in the Six next Vacancies, then again the Master in the next one, and then the Wardens for the six next, etc., yet it shall not be lawful for the said Wardens to put one that is of the Livery of their own Company, or any other Company of the said City, into the said places, yet poor Citizens of London, and especially the poor of the Mercers, who are not, nor have been of the Livery (qui de liberata minime fuerint), and whom the Company are not bound to maintain, and poor Clerks and inferiour Officers of the Colledge aforesaid, are to be preferr'd to the said places before others; that the Tutor and poor People be daily present at Mattins, Masses, Vespers, and Complin, in the Colledge or Church abovemention'd, and at the prayers to be there made for the Souls of Richard Whitington and Alice their Founders, Sir William Whittington Knight, the Lord Ivo Fitz-Waryn, and the Lady Maud his Wife, Parents of the said Richard and Alice, King Richard II. and Thomas late Duke of Gloucester, etc. That they shall say for the said Souls as often as they can conveniently, three, or at least two Psalters, i.e., fifty Aves, and fifteen Paters, and three Creeds, that they should all go daily to the Tomb of the said Richard and Alice, and there say the Psalm de Profundis, after which the Tutor to say aloud in English God have mercy on our Founders Souls, and all Christen, and the rest answer, Amen; that the Tutor shall not be absent from the said House above ten nights in a year, nor any poor Man, above one whole day without License, or great necessity; That they have a Common Chest, and a Common Seal, the Chest to have three different Keys, etc. That the Tutor have and receive every week for his Pension 16d. and every poor person 4d. that no Leprous, or mad Man be admitted into the House, etc., if any Estate falls to any poor Man of the clear yearly value of five marks, that he be removed, and another poor Person put in his place, but if it be under five marks per Annum, let him give half to the Common Chest and keep the other half; Vicious persons after the third fault to be expell'd the Hospital as incorrigible; That these Orders and Statutes be read, and intelligibly expounded, before the Tutor and poor People once every quarter of a year; With power reserved to the said Executors while they or any of them live, to add, correct, or alter any of these Orders. Dated 21. December Anno Dom. 1424. (3. H. 6.)

RUTHYN Hospital in Denbighshire.

QUeen Elizabeth, at the Petition of Gabriel Goodman Doctor of Divinity, and Dean of the Collegiate Church of Westminster, erected, created, founded, and establisht, an Hospital in Ruthyn in the County of Denbigh, to be call'd Christ's Hospital in Ruthin, to consist of one Preacher and twelve poor People for ever; and ordain'd that there should be one President, and one Warden of the same, and nominated the then Bishop of

282 Additions to the Second Volume. VOL. III.

Bangor and his Successors, for the time being, to be President, and Eubolus Theloall Master in Arts, to be the first Warden of the said Hospital, and all the Possessions, Lands and Goods thereunto belonging; that the said President and Warden be a Body corporate for ever, by the name of the President and Warden of Christ's Hospital in Ruthin, by the said name to purchase and receive Lands, etc., as well of the said Gabriel Goodman, as any other person, for the support and maintenance of the said Hospital; that they have a Common Seal; that they may sue and be sued by the said name in all Courts; with power to the said Gabriel Goodman during his Life to elect, nominate, and appoint the Wardens and poor People of the said Hospital as often as there shall be occasion, and to make and appoint Statutes and Orders for Government of the same; with license to the said President, and Warden, and their Successors to purchase Lands not exceeding the clear yearly value of 100 1. etc. the Statute of Mortmain or any other Stat. non obstante. Letters Patents to be past of all this under the Great Seal of England without any manner of Fine or Fee to be paid etc.

DROHEDA Hospital, in Ireland.

FOunded by Ursus de Swemele, without the West-Gate of Droheda, for the relief of poor and helpless People, and by him endow'd with all the Lands and Rents that he had in Ireland, and gave the Election of the Custos (after his death) to the Honest men, or Free-men (probos homines) of Drohida.

Page 792. SEMPRINGHAM.

THE Master and Canons of Sempringham declared by their Deed, that they and theirs in the place call'd Mirmaude, the Gift of Ralph de Hanvill, are subject to the Jurisdiction of the Bishop of Ely as their Diocesan, notwithstanding their Priviledges.

Page 825. ELLERTON.

GIlbert the II. Master of the Order of Sempringham, and John Prior and the Convent of Ellerton, obliged themselves to the maintenance of thirteen poor People in the Hospital of the Church of Ellerton, founded by William Fitz-Peter.

Page 514. St. John of Jerusalem, in the Suburbs of London.

KING Philip and Queen Mary by their Letters Patents, and Cardinal Pole Legate a Latere, restored and establisht the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, to its Pristine Estate, and the Priory and Hospital of St. John of Clerkenwell lately dissolved, and constituted Sir Thomas Tresham Knt. Prior of the same, Richard Shelley, Peter Felices, Cuthbert Laithen, Edward Brown, Thomas Thornell, Henry Gerard, George Aylmer, James Shelley and Oliver Starkey, Commendators or Preceptors of the said

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Hospital, whom the said King and Queen incorporated by the name of Prior and Confraters of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem in England, to have perpetual Succession, and by that name to sue and be sued, to purchase and take Lands, etc., and to have a Common Seal; and gave them all that Capital House and Scite of the said Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, situate and being near Clerkenwell, in Middlesex, with the Church and all Houses and Buildings, Gardens and Orchards, etc., thereunto belonging, also all that Wood and Wood-ground call'd Grete St. John's Wood, lying near Maribone-Park in Middlesex, and all other Lands and Tenements whatsoever that were in the Possession of the Prior and Confraters of the said Hospital at the time of the Dissolution of the same, and all Goods and Furniture belonging to the said House, etc. Which Letters Pattents bear date at Grenewiche, April the 2d. in the fourth and fifth year of their Reign.

Page 247. BUTLEY.

KING Henry the VII. in the four and twentieth year of his Reign granted to Robert Brommer Prior of the Monastery of Butley, and the Convent of the same, the Priory of the blessed Mary of Snape in Suffolk, with all Lands and Revenues thereunto belonging, or which Thomas Neyland late Prior of the said Priory enjoy'd in right of the same, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms without Account or any Rent, and to be annext to the said Priory of Butley.

NEWINTON-LONGVILLE, an alian Priory in Buckinghamshire.

THIS was a Cell to the Abby of St. Faith at Longville in Normandy, to which Walter Gifford Earl of Buckingham, gave and confirm'd divers Lands and Revenues with great Priviledges in his Forrest of Waddon, free and discharged of all Exactions, etc.

284 VOL. III.

CATHEDRAL CHURCHES Of Canons Secular.

CHICHISTER Cathedral, in Sussex.

ANno Dom. 673. Ceadwalla King of the South-Saxons, at the Request of Bishop Wilfrid, gave divers Lands for the Building and Endowment of a Monastery at Selesey. Bruny Duke of Sussex, Northelmus King of Sussex, Anno 692. Numa King of Sussex, Anno 714. Oslac Duke of Sussex, Anno 780. were Benefactors to this Religious House of Selsey. Abbot Pleghaard having transferr'd certain Revenues in Deaton to the Episcopal Church at Selesey, which Revenues he had of the Gift of King Offa, they were fixt and establisht to the said Church, in a Synod held at Clobeham, Anno 825. King Athelstan gave Lands to the said Church, Anno 930. the like did King Edmund, King Eadwyn, King Ethelred, and Ethelbert. King William gave Lands and Liberties to the Church of Chichester (the See being then translated thither) the like did King Henry the I. and King Steven, which last gave and confirm'd to the Church of the holy Trinity at Chichester, and to Hillary Bishop of the same, divers Lands and Franchises, some of which Lands the said Bishop and his Successors were to hold by being Chaplains to Maud his Queen and her Successors. William Earl of Chichester gave to this Church among other things, the fourth part of the City; King John confirm'd to this Church all the Lands, etc., and Liberties which they then had or should have; The like did King Henry the III. to Ralph the II. Bishop of Chichester, his Chancellor. The Prior and Convent of St. Bartholmew's at London granted to the Bishops of this See, certain Houses in the Parish of St. Sepulchers, without Newgate, to hold by the yearly Rent of one pound of frankincense, or six-pence, at the Feast of St. Michael. Ranulphus Bishop of Chichester (who writes him self the humble Minister of the Church of Chichester), caused to be provided for the Mannors of that Bishoprick, a stock or store of Cattel, viz., two hundred and fifty two Oxen, one hundred Crows, ten Bulls, three thousand one hundred and fifty Seep (Bidentia) one hundred and twenty she Goats, and six he Goats, and ten Plow-horses, which Stock he ordered to be continued by all his Successors under censure of Excommunication, and to be Anathema Maranatha; Confirmed and ratified by King Henry the III. John Earl of Eu, restored to this Church, by Deed dated Anno 1248. the Mannor of Bixle, which his Grandfather and Father had unjustly taken, and a long time detain'd from it.

St. PETERS Cathedral, at York.

ON Easter day, Anno 627. Edwyn King of the Northumbers was baptized by Paulinus at York, in a small Church built on purpose, of Wood. This Church dedicated to St. Peter, was made the Archiepiscopal Seat of the said Paulinus, who had converted all that Province to the Christian

VOL. III. Cathedral Churches. 285

Faith. Afterwards in the year 1067. Thomas a Canon of Bayeux, being made Archbishop, built the Church of Stone, after a larger manner. Anno 958. King Eadway gave Suthwell to Oseytell Archbishop of York. King Athelstan, King Canute the Dane, King Edward the Confessor, were Benefactors to this Church. King William Rufus, who stiles himself Son of King William, who succeeded King Edward by hereditary Right, gave to Thomas Archbishop of York and his successors the Abby of St. German of Seleby, and the Church of St. Oswald at Gloucester, in lieu of the Jurisdiction which the said Archbishop claim'd over Lincoln, and Linsey, which the said Archbishop thereupon quitted, for ever. The said King confirmed all the Liberties of this Church, as did also Pope Honorius, who exempted this Archbishop from Subjection to that of Canterbury. Pope Alexander granted to Thomas Archbishop of York the Pallium, to be by him worn on Solemn Occasions. King Hen. I. and II. and Maud the Empress, granted Lands, Churches, and Liberties, to the Canons of this Cathedral. Roger Archbishop of York, built anew the Quire and Vaults under it at St. Peter's, and the Archiepiscopal Pallace thereunto adjoyning; he also built the Chappel of the holy Sepulcher adjoyning to the Gate of the said Pallace, and dedicated it in honour of the Virgin Mary and the holy Angels, endowed it with eleven Churches and settled therein thirteen Ministers, four Priests, four Deacons, four Sub-deacons, and one Sacristan to be chief, each Priest to have ten Marks per Annum, each Deacon 100s. and each Sub-deacon six Marks, the rest to the Sacristan; Sewallus who was consecrated Archbishop of York in the year 1256. perceiving the Revenue of the said eleven Churches to be very much increased, caused Vicars to be establisht in the said Churches, presentable by the foresaid Sacristan; and made Orders for the Government of the said Ministers or Canons of the Chappel aforesaid; The names of which eleven Churches are these, Thorp-Arches, Colingham, Berdeseye, Otteleye, Calverley, Hoton-Paynel, Sutton, Everton, Hayton, Clareburgh, and Retford, the Vicars of all which he caused to be endow'd, some with the whole Altarage, others with part, etc. King Henry the VI. in the three and thirtieth year of his Reign granted his License to William then Archbishop of York and others to purchase a House to be a Colledge, wherein the Chantry Priests of the Cathedral Church might inhabit together, which said Priests be incorporated, with License to purchase Lands to the value of ten Marks per Annum. The like Letters Pattents were granted by King Edward. IV. in his first year, for erecting a Colledge of the said Chantry Priests, (Persones in Kyrk of York) with license to the said Colledge to purchase Lands, etc., to the value of 100 l. per Annum. Pope Innocent confirm'd the Lands, etc., of this Church, and the use of the Pall to the Archbishop. Pope Paschalis, and Calixtus, exempted this Archbishop from Subjection to Canterbury.

William King of Scotland certified to Pope Alexander that the Church of Scotland was of old times subject to the Church of York,and desired that by his Authority it may be made so again. Pope Honorius writ to the King of Norway to restore to Ralf Bishop of the Orcades consecrated by, and Subject to the Jurisdiction of the Archbishop of York, the Possessions belonging to the said Bishoprick. Olaus King of the Isles writ to the Archbishop of York at the recommendation of the Abbot of Furnes, to obtain from him the Consecration of a Bishop to propagate the Christian Religion in the Isles. Pope Calixtus writ to the Bishop of Glascow, commanding him to submit himself to the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of

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York within thirty days after the receit of his Letters. Pope Honorius writ to the Bishop elect of Galleway (Candida cafa) to repair to the Archbishop of York as his proper Metropolitan, for Consecration, etc. Pope Paschal writ to all the Bishops of Scotland to submit to York as their Metropolitan; the like did Calixtus and Innocent, which last writ to the Archbishop of Canterbury, his Legate, to denounce the Bishop of Glascow excommunicate unless he submits himself to the Archbishop of York within three Months, after admonition. Pope Honorius writ to the Archbishop at Canterbury and all the Bishops of England, and to King Henry I. that the Archbishop of York may, according to antient Custome, be permitted to have his Cross born before him, in all parts of England and to Crown the King, in such manner as has been used. The Bishop of Galleway made a tormal Act of Subjection and Canonical Obedience to this Archbishop, in like manner as did Durham, and Carlile.

Roger de Mowbray, Peter de Ros, William Paynell, the Lord William de Percy, who gave the Church of Topcliffe, to the Fabrick of this Church (in return for which the Dean and Chapter promised to find a fit Chaplain for ever to celebrate in the Chappel of the Blessed Mary at Topcliffe, and to allow him 100s. yearly), Jeffry Fitz-Peter Earl of Essex, the Abbot and Convent of Albemarl, who gave Preston, and other Churches in Holderness Anno 1228. Nicholas de Stutville who gave Michael de Hamelscia his Native or Villain, and all his progeny; Henry Fitz Thomas, and others, were Benefactors to this Church. An Inquisition was taken Anno Dom. 1275 (4. Edward I.), in which all the Lands and Liberties of the Church of St. Peter, in the City and Suburbs of York, were set forth and exprest, some of which the Jury then found to have belong'd to that Church time out of memory. Walter Gray Archbishop of York granted to the Chapter of York by Deed dated, Anno 1241. All his Mansion House, and all his Lands, etc., in Thorp St. Andrew, or Bishops Thorp, with Provision that the said Chapter reconvey the Premisses to his Successors to hold by the Rent of 20 marks per Annum at the feast of St. Martin, which twenty marks to be distributed to poor People on the day of his Anniversary, etc. The said Walter in the 33 year of his consecration caused certain Vicarages to be endow'd in the Churches of Tickhill etc., which Churches were appropriated to the Prior and Convent of St. Oswald of Nostel; in particular to the support of the Vicar of Tickhill, and one associate Priest, a Deacon, and Subdeacon there, he appointed the whole Altarage, in which name he specifies all Oblations, Tithes and profits of the Church of Tickhill, except Tithes of Corn, pulse, and hay, and the Lands belonging to the said Church, saving a Competent Mansion to be assign'd to the Vicar, which Tithes of Garbs, and Hay, and the said Lands, shall remain to the said Convent of Nostell, etc. Herbert the Chamberlain, Brother of King Steven, and Steven and Reginald his Sons were Benefactors to this Church of St. Peter. King Henry II. granted to Archbishop Walter, and his Successors Free Warren, in their Mannours of Shirburn, and Cawood. Aufridus de Chanci, Paganus de Vilers, John Constable of Chester, Robert de Vavasour, and others, were also Benefactors. Thomas Archbishop of York, before mention'd, dyed at York on the Octaves of St. Martin, Anno Dom. 1100. in great Reputation; as appears by his Epitapth enter'd in the Register of that Church.

There were certain Customes and Orders used of old time in this Church, as, that upon the Archbishops first coming to this City after his

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Consecration, he was to be received in solemn Procession, so also when he returns at anytime from beyond Sea, etc. That the Bishop of Durham was to present him with a rich Cope after his Consecration; that every Prebendary should in his life-time give a Cope value 10 l. or after his death twenty Marks, and at his death his Palfrey; that the Dean is to be install'd by the Precentor, etc. That the Dean is bound to feed forty poor People daily, that he is the greatest in the Church, next The Archbishop, and in the Chapter the greatest of all. Anno Dom. 1200. the then Dean and Canons did order and ordain, that four Persons should be constantly resident, viz., the Dean, the Chantor, the Chancellor, and the Treasurer, the Archdeacons to reside for three months in a year, other Canons for half a year, the common Profits to be divided among those only who are resident, that no Vicar shall be admitted for favour, but only such as are worthy and proper for the Service of the Church, that none be promoted but by the Dean and Chapter, and that no Vicar or interior Minister be admitted into the Quire unless he have a good Voice. King Henry the VIII. made and establisht new Statutes by Letters Patents, in the time of Edward Archbishop of York, whereby reciting that they had in this Church an evil Custom, long used, that every Canon Prebendary was bound to spend in feasting the first year of his Residency one thousand Marks, or else he could not partake of the Emoluments of the Place, he abolishes the said Custom, and all Statutes relating thereunto, and Orders that the Statutes relating to the great Residency be observed, and that they have their Distributions and Emoluments on the account of Residency duly paid from the day of their first entry on the same; if there be none residing then all the common Profits of the Church to go wholly to the Treafury of St. Peter, That all Canons then being in the City of York, as well not resident as resident, be called to assist at all Chapters, that to the Chest wherein the Common-Seal is kept, be three different Locks and Keys, one to be kept by the Dean, the other two by the two Senior Residents, or if there be not at that time two Residentiaries then by the Precentor, and Chancellor, etc., that all Custom incouraging Pomp and Prodigality be abolisht, that a division of the Profits be made at the Feast of St Martin according to the Days, Weeks, or Months of the Residentiaries residing; which Canons in the time of their Residency are to be present at Vespers, Mattins, and high Mass at least, without just excuse, under pain of losing that days distribution when absent, etc. Every Canon Residentiary to live at a House within the Close of the Cathedral, and to have in Benefices at least 100 l. per Annum, That the Vicars Choral shall when every Canon begins his greater Residence, receive 5 l. and afterwards 6 l. 13s. 4d. per Annum. That every Canon having a Prebend worth 8 l. per Annum, shall yearly at the Feast of St. Martin contribute and pay into the hands of the Chancellor of this Church 6s. 8d. for the providing of Preachers in the said Church, which Preachers are to be provided on the Rogation-days, Sundays, and other days at discretion, this not to excuse the Dean, and Chancellor, or any others to preach themselves as they are obliged by Statute or Custom, etc. Which Letters Pattens bear date 3 June 33. H. 2.

To this Cathedral Church did belong abundance of jewels, Vessels of Gold and Silver, and other Ornaments, rich Vestments and Books, viz., ten Miters of great value, among which one small Miter with Stones for the Bishop of the Boys, or Children (pro Episcopo puerorum) one Silver

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and gilt Pastoral Staff, many Pastoral Rings, among which one for the Bishop of the Boys; Chalices, Vials, Pots, Batons, Candlesticks, Thuribules, Holy Water-Pots, Crosses of Silver, one of which weighed eight pound six ounces, Images of Silver and Gold, Relicks in Cases extreamly rich, great Bouls of Silver, a Unicorns-Horn, a Table of Silver and gilt with the Image of the blessed Virgin enamiled thereon, weighing nine pounds eight ounces and a half, several Gospellaries and Epistollaries, richly adorn'd with Silver, Gold, and precious Stones; Jewells affixt to Shrines and Tombs, of almost inestimable value, Altar Cloaths, and hangings very rich, Copes of Tissue, Damask, and Velvet, white, red, blew, green, purple, and black, with other Vestments of the same Colours. Besides this there was a great Treasure in the Common Chest, in Gold Chains, collors of S.S. etc., with Sums of old Gold, and Silver deposited in the years 1517, 1518, 1519, and 1520.

HEREFORD Cathedral

MIlefrid King of the Mercians built and endowed this Church, and constituted a Bishop here; this he did as a kind of expiation for the death of Ethelbert (King of the East-Angels, murdered by Offa King of Mercia), and reputed a Saint and Martyr. King Edward the Confessor granted Liberties to the Priests of this Church. In the time of the said King Edward, Walter then Bishop of this Church had one hundred Masuras wanting two (each Masura contains about four Oxgangs of Land) Robert Bishop here (who succeeded the other) found forty Hides of Land belonging to this See, but all wasted. The Canons of Hereford held many Mannors and Lands, etc., in right of their Church at the time of the Conquest, as appears by Domesday-Book, a true Copy whereof expressing the particulars in the several Hundreds where they lay, is transcribed and printed p. 182, 183, 184, the whole in the said Bishoprick amounting to 300 Hides of Land. Ralph Bishop of Hereford granted to the Dean and Chapter of that Church, all his Land of Hamme, then valued at 15 l. per Annum, which he had lately purchased of Simon de Clifford, to hold by the service of one Knights Fee and a half, and the said Dean and Chapter granted to him to celebrate the Divine Offices on the day of his Obit, yearly. The Mannor of Hamme, in which the said Land lay, was given to the Prior and Convent of Crassewell by Walter de Lascy, and by the Prior and Convent of Crassewell sold and convey'd to Peter de Aquablanca Bishop of Hereford and his Heirs, for the Sum of five hundred Marks; which Peter gave the said Mannor and several other good Gifts to the Church of Hereford. King William the Conqueror restored to this Church divers Mannors unjustly taken from it by Earl Herald. Ralph Murdac confirmed to the Church of St. Mary and St. Ethelbert, and to the Canons of the same, the Church of Putley, given them by William D'evereus his Predecessor.

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LANDAFF Cathedral.

ANno Dom. 156. Lucius King of the Britains, having applied himself to Pope Elutherius, He and the Chief of his Kingdom were baptized into the Christian Religion; the sincere Doctrines of which they preserved uncorrupted till the Pelagian Heresie arose; to reform and confute which, St. Germanus, and Lupus, being sent for out of France, they before they went back consecrated Bishops in several parts of this Isle, in particular they consecrated Dubricius a holy and great Doctor, an Archbishop; and appointed for him an Episcopal Seat, which was by the grant of King Mouric, founded at a place called Poduni Lantani in honour of St. Peter, and by that King endow'd with all between Taf, and Elei, and by Apostolick Authority with great Ecclesiastical Priviledges. This Dubricius founded divers Churches, and settled Bishops in the Right side of Britain (per dextralem Britanniam) in particular he consecrated Daniel Bishop in the City of Bangor. Guorduc offered up (immolavit) his Virgin Daughter Dulon to Dubricius Archbishop of Landaff, whom he consecrated a Nun, forever; her Father gave with her divers Lands. Anno Dom. 612. St. Dubricius Bishop of Landaff departed this life, and in the year 1120. was with great Solemnity translated from the Isle of Enli, to his Church of Landaff, at which time and action, some miraculous Events are said to happen. Urban Bishop of Landaff complained to Pope Calixtus that whereas this Church was at its first erection, the Misstress of all the Churches of Wales, and had once four and twenty Canons, of which there remained at that time but two, and the Revenues almost desolate, by the Invasion of Laymen and Monks, and also of his own Brothers, the Bishop of Hereford, and the Bishop of St. Davids, he therefore prays the said Pope to succour him and his Church.

Idon a British King was a great Benefactor to this Church, in the time of St. Telian, Successor to the foresaid Dubricius. Also King Murgetud, and King Aircol, and one Tutuc, gave to the same Archbishop Telian, divers Lands and Possessions, as an expiatory penance for certain Murders. King Mouric before mentioned was the Son of King Teudiric, who having settled his Kingdom in Peace, resigned the Government to his Son, and himself became a Hermit; but his Kingdom being afterwards invaded by the Saxons, and his Son in great danger of losing it, he was admonisht by an Angel that he should leave his Retirement and head the Army, that they would fly at his fight, and that he should, however, receive a wound and die in peace after three days; all which happened as foretold, and he dying in an Isle call'd in Welch Cchni, his said Son built there an Oratory and Cimitery, and gave all the Territory about it to the Church of Landaff, this was in the time of Oudoctus the third Bishop of this See. The said Mouric having by treachery killed Cynvetu, after he had sworn to a firm peace with him, before the Relicks of the Saints, was Excommunicated, for redemption of which, and as part of his pennance, he gave to this Church four Towns with their Liberties. King Morcant, and Augustus King of Brecknoc, and King Judhail, were Benefactors, so was Gurvodius upon his having obtained a great Victory over the Saxons. In the time of Bishop Gurvan, Teudor and Elgift Kings of Brecknock, swore a firm and mutual Peace with each other, before the Relicks of the Saints, after which King Teudor took occasion to Kill Elgift; for which Homicide and Perjury being

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excommunicate, and upon his Absolution being Enjoyn'd for Penance, Almes, Prayer, and Fasting, he gave in Almes to this Church of Landaff divers Lands and Revenues. Briteon hail Son of Devon sacrificed (immolavit) to God, and St. Dubricius, six Churches with all their Liberties and Profits, in one day. King Clotri and King Judgvalaun, having sworn a firm Peace before the holy Gospells and Reliques upon the Altar, in Presence of Bishop Berthguin and the Clergy, after which Clotri killing Judgvalaun, he was for his homicide and perjury, excomunicated with all his Progeny and Kingdom, by the said Bishop and Clergy in a full Synod. Afterwards being absolved and enjoyn'd Penance, as part of the same he gave divers Lands to this Church of Landaff. Guidnerth having slain his Brother, was for his homicide and Fratricide, excommunicated by Bishop Oudocus in a full Synod, and after three years, having perform'd an enjoyn'd Pennance into Cornwal (the Brittons and those of Cornwal being of the same language and Nation tho' divided in territory) he was upon his great sorrow and tears absolved, after which he gave divers Lands to this Church. Gurcan who succeeded Guinan, having lived incestuously with his Mother in Law, was therefore in full Synod excommunicated by Bishop Erthguin, and after upon his reformation being absolved, gave divers Lands to this Church. King Clitauc Son of Clitguin, was a Prince who governed his Kingdom in Peace and exact Justice, and became afterwards a Martyr on this account: A young Virgin of quality was in love with him so far as to declare she would never marry unless to Clitauc, whereupon a Nobleman of the Court, whose Sute she had refused, for the Kings sake, in revenge murder'd the innocent King in hunting. After whose Murder the Bishop of Landaff caused to be built, and consecrated, a Church to his memory, in the place where he was buried near the River Myngui, etc. Which with divers Lands given to the same, was afterwards granted to the Bishops of Landaff, by King Judhail Son of Morcant. A Noble man of the same name, Judhail Son of Edelvirth, going with his Wife on a Sunday to hear divine Service at St. Clitauc's, was so far prevail'd upon by the Devils instigation and his own lust, as to lie with his Wife in a Meadow on the Bank of Mingui, and having perform'd the Act, and about to withdraw, he found himself not able to disjoyn, but was forced to remain in that Posture inseperable from his Wife, whereupon he call'd out to his Attendants, and order'd them to repair to the Monument of the Martyr Clitauc, and there offer in his name that Meadow which he had unjustly taken from that Church, this being done, with promise of amendment of Life, he was again separated from that vexatious Conjunction. Convar bought certain Lands of King Fernvail, Son of Judhail, for an excellent horse of the price 12 Cows, a Dog that had kill'd Birds, with a Hawk (cum Ancipitre) of the Price of 3 Cows, and another Horse of the Price of 3 Cows, which Lands so purchased he gave to the Bishops of this Church of Landaff. Fernuhail, Convelin, King Ris Son of Judhail, and abundance of other Kings and great Men in Wales, were Benefactors to this Church. King Hovel being excomunicated by the Bishop and Synod at Landaff for killing Galcun, after a peace sworn, upon his Absolution gave divers Lands to this Church; the like did Ili Son of Conblus, who was excommunicated for killing Camauc after a Peace sworn between them. Agvod Son of Jovaf having an angry Contest betwixt his family and the Bishops, came up to the Church Door, and threw stones into the Church, and then fled, under an

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Anathema; for which he afterwards beg'd pardon and gave divers Lands to Corenhiro then Bishop and his Successors. King Nongui gave Lands for violating the Liberties of this Church and committing Sacriledge. Anno Dom. 955. Pater being then Bishop of this Church, six men of the Family of Nongui, broke into a Church in this Diocess, and there kill'd a Deacon before the Altar, who had fled thither for Sanctuary, for which they were delivered up to the Bishop, and remain'd imprison'd six months in Chains, and they were further sentenccd by a Synod that they should forfeit all their Lands and Substance to the Church which they had prophaned. Asser Son of Marchvid, having kill'd Gulagguin by treachery, gave to this Church the Town of Segan, etc. Brochmail Son of Mouric, gave to this Church certain Lands which he had before given to his Daughter whom he made a Nun, but she being seduced from her Vow by Etgar Son of Levi had a Son, incestuously. Teudur King of Brecknock, King Grifud, etc., were also Benefactors.

Anno Dom. 982. Gucaun Bishop of Landaff was consecrated by the Metropolitan Dunstan Archbishop of Canterbury, and had his Pastoral Staff given him by Edgar the Supream King of the English. At the same time, lived Edgar King of all Britain, Huwel da, and Morgan hen, which two last were subject to King Edgar.

Etguin King of Guenti having a great contest with Bledri Bishop of Landaff, it went so far that the Bishop himself was wounded, whereupon he summon'd and assembled all the Clergy from Taratir in Gui, to Tigui, who in full Synod Anathematized the King, with his whole Family, and put his Country under interdict; but the King seeking absolution, obtain'd it, and thereupon give divers Lands to this Church. Mouric Son of Hivil, after he had solemnly sworn to a Peace and Friendship with Etguin a Neighbouring King, before Joseph Bishop of Landaff, seized upon the said Etguin, cast him in Prison, and put out his eyes, which occasion'd his death, for which being curst in a Synod, he afterwards obtain'd absolution, and gave several Towns to this Church. King Mouric, and Caratanc one of his Lords, being under censure for violating the Sanctuary of this Church, obtain'd remission and gave divers Lands, The like happened in the Cafes of Catguallaun, Ringuallaun, Gistinus, and others, who being guilty of like Crimes, made the like Compensations.

When King William conquer'd England, Hergualdus was Bishop of Landaff, Catguacaun Son of Mouric King of Glatmorcant, Caratoc, and Riderch Kings of other parts of Wales, all which Kings served King William, and died in his time.

LITCHFELD Cathedral.

THIS was formerly call'd the Mercian Church, and first founded in the year 657. upon the Conversion of this Province to the Christian Religion, it was then made a Cathedral, and Duina the first Bishop of the Mercians or middle English, who govern'd here but two years and died. To him succeeded Cellach, a Scot. After him Trumhere, and after him Jarman, both Englishmen, but ordain'd Bishops in Scotland. To these succceded St. Cedda, Anno Dom. 667. who had been before that Bishop of York. After whose death succceded Winfrid, and after him Sexwolf who founded the Abby of Peterborough, after whose death the Province of

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Mercia was divided into two Diocesses (Parichias) Litchfield and Leicester, tho' after a while they were both united again under Hedda Bishop of Litchfield, who died. Anno 721. In the time of Ethelred King of Mercia, the Bishoprick of Litchfield was divided into five Diocesses, viz. Hereford, Worcester, Litchfield, Leicester, and Lindisey. After this division Litchfield had five successive Bishops till the time of Adulphus who was made Archbishop of Litchfield by Pope Hadrian, Anno 764. and a Jurisdiction given him over all Mercia and the East-Angles, but after him there was no more Archbishops. From his time to the Norman Conquest were fifteen Bishops of Litchfield, soon after which the Episcopal Seat was translated from Litchfield to Chester, Anno 1075. The second Bishop of Chester was Robert de Lymest, who Anno 1095. removed his Seat again, from Chester to the rich Monastery at Coventry, not long before built, and magnificently endow'd by Earl Leofrick and Godeva his Wife. To him succeeded Robert Peche, Roger de Clinton, Walter Durdent, Richard Peche, and Gerard de Puella, all of them successively Bishops of Coventry, and most buried there. The following Bishops were called Bishops of Coventry and Litchfield, whose names are Hugo de Novant, who in the year 1190. displaced the Monks from the Monastery at Coventry and introduced Secular Canons in their stead (but the Monks were restored again after seven years) Jeffrey de Muschampe, Anno 1199. William de Cornhill, Anno 1215. Alexander de Savensby, Anno 1224. in whose time Pope Honorious ordered that one time the Election of the Bishop should be made in the Church of Coventry by the Convent of Monks there and the Chapter of Litchfield, and the next time in the Church of Litchfield by the said Convent and Chapter. Hugo de Pateshull, Anno 1240. Roger de Wescham, Anno 1245. Roger de Meyland, Anno 1256. Walter de Langton, Anno 1296. he was a great Benefactor to the Church of Litchfield. Roger de Norburgh, Anno 1322.

Penda King of the Mercians, a Man phanatical and impious (fanaticus & impius) after he had reign'd thirty years was overcome by Oswy King of the Northumbers, Anno 656. Which Oswy becoming King of Mercia, was the occasion of the Conversion of that Province to the Christian Faith, and founded the Mercian Church, now call'd Litchfield, and died, Anno 670. In the City of Litchfield were two Monasteries, one in the East-part where St. Cedda used to make his Prayers, and preach to the People, which place is since called Stow, the other was in the West-part, and dedicated to the blessed Virgin Mary; here the Bishop made his Seat, his Habitation contained six and thirty foot in length, and twenty eight in breadth; the Deans Apartment adjoyn'd to that of the Bishop, and contained half the Dimensions, the Mansions of the Canons contain'd each half the Dimensions of the Deans. Roger de Clinton the third Bishop of Coventry was the first Erector of a Colledge of Canons at Litchfield, there being before that time only five Priests in that Church serving at five Altars. These Canons of Litchfield did sometimes refuse to admit the Bishop when chosen and enthonizated at Coventry, the Prior of which place had of right the first Voice in his Election. The Prior of Coventry and his Convent pretended to have the sole and free choice of the Bishop, but King John after a long contest with them, over-aw'd them at Nottingham to chose William de Gray his Chancellor their Bishop, and not only so, but to joyn with the Canons of Litchfield in the Election. But that Election being set aside as forced, the Prior and Monks only, chose William de Cornhiill, Archdeacon of Huntington; all this was done in the time of a general Interdictt.

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The Episcopal Seat was translated from Litchfield to Chester in the time of William the Conqueror, and from Chester to Coventry in the Reign of King Henry the I. Boniface Archbishop of Canterbury recited and confirm'd the Grant of Roger Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, whereby, with the Consent of the Prior and Convent of Coventry he granted and confirm'd to the Dean, and Chapter, and Church of Litchfield, divers Lands and Rents, and alotted the same to such and such Offices and Duties, and ratified the Constitutions of Hugh his Predecessor, and granted and establisht by his Pontifical Authority, that the Churches of Coventry and Litchfield should have equal Power in the Election of the Bishop. Which Confirmation by the Archbishop of Canterbury bears date, Anno Dom. 1259. King Richard the I. granted divers Lands and Franchises to this Church, confirm'd by Pope Honorius. John Archbishop of Canterbury made and provided several good Orders and Constitutions to be observed by the Dean and Chapter of this Church in relation to the reparing the Parish Churches and Chappels to them belonging, for the Augmentation of the Vicars and other Clergymens Profits therein, and for providing Books and Ornaments for the same, also that they be moderate in receiving their Mortuaries and Tithes, he having heard great complaints of their rigorous exactions that way, etc. Dated, Anno Dom. 1280. King John, while Earl of Moreton, was a Benefactor to this Church whose grant was confirm'd by his Son King Henry the III. Anno 50. Roqer call'd the Amnener gave and confirm'd to Roger de Mulent Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, a parcel of Land and Buildings lying in the Parish of St. Mary le Stronde without London towards Westminster, between the High-way that leads from London to Westminster and the Thames to hold to the said Roger and his Successors, by the yearly Rent of 3s. payable at Easter, for the purchase of which the said Bishop gave twenty Marks of Silver. Pope Eugenius confirm'd the Lands and Possessions given to this Church, and establisht the Episcopal Seat at Coventry, Anno 1151. William Bishop of Coventry gave and confirm'd to the Canons of Litchfield the Church of Hope, and Chappel of Tideswell for their common Provision in Bread and Beer. King Steven granted to the Church of St. Cedd at Litchfield, and Walter Bishop of Coventry and his Succcessors for ever, a Mint for the Coyning of Mony at Litchfield. King Edward the I. granted to Roger Meulund Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, and his Successors, the Forrest or free Chase of Canok in Staffordshire, with the usual Liberties, to hold in Frankalmoine, etc.

Anno Dom. 1397. Thomas de Stretton Dean of Litchfield and the Chapter of that Church, deposited two hundred Marks in a Chest called the Chest of Grace, to be kept under four several Locks and Keys, to be opened and used, when the Steward has not sufficient of the usual Income to supply the Commons of the Canons Residentiary and Vicars, for so much only as shall be wanting, the same to be paid again by the Steward to the Common Chest before he passes his Accounts, etc. All which was confirm'd and ratified by Richard Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield. Anno Dom. 1411. John Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, granted and demised to the Chantry Priests in the Church of Litchfield a common Lodging or Habitation within the Close at Litchfield, to have and to hold to them and their Successors for the term of ninety eight years at the Rent of 12d. per Annum payable to the Bishop and his Successors. There were formerly in this Church seventeen Chantries founded by several Persons.

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Jeffrey Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield. James Denton Dean, and the Chapter of the said Church, made a Collection of all Statutes and Orders that had been made in the times of former Bishops, altering some, and adding others as there was occasion, and having out of that Collection compiled a body of Statutes, presented it to Cardinal Wolsey Archbishop of York and Legat de Latere, to be confirmed by his Legantine Authority; In which Statutes are contain'd directions for saying the Divine Offices and the several Canonical hours; The Offices and Duties of the four Principal Persons in the Church of Litchfeild, viz. The Dean, Precentor, Treasurer, and Chancellor, also of the Sacristan, and after what manner the several Bells are to be toll'd or Rung at the several hours and Offices. Also of the Archdeacons, and Succentor; That the Dean is the Head of the Chapter, that when he enters or passes by, all the Clergy ought to stand up, etc. The Office and duty of the Vicars, and secular Clerks commonly call'd Clerk Vicars; The manner of installing the Canons, all whose stalls and proper Seats are set out in a Scheme; That all Clerks entring into the Quire, bow first to the Altar, then to the Bishop, or in his Absence to the Dean, with directions when to stand up, and kneel, etc., and what habits and collours are to be used upon such and such days; That the Dean be continually Resident, that he Celebrates Mass on all double Feasts, that he preach on Ash Wednesday and Advent Sunday, etc. That every Canon have a Vicar continually serving in the Church; That or two of the Canons be Chosen at Michaelmas yearly, to receive and distribute the Common Goods of the Church, and to account for the same; The manner of calling and holding the Chapters; That on the Festivals of St. Cedde, and the assumption of the Virgin Mary, the Dean feast all the Quire, the Canons to be singly invited eight days before the time; That from Trinity Sunday to Christmas Mattins be immediately said after Complin, and the several Masses at such and such hours, etc. That Mattins and Vespers, and all the hours be perform'd according to the Salisbury use ; That in case any difference shall happen among the Canons it shall be composed among themselves, if it may be, if not, by the Dean and Chapter within two Months, if not by them, then by the Bishop within two Months more, if that cannot be, the party injured may be at Liberty to seek redress in Law elswhereas he sees convenient; That the Statutes of this Church be writ fair in a Book of Parchment, and that to be chain'd in such place where the Canons, but not others, have access to it. That no Minister of this Church lie a night in the Town, without reasonable Cause to be approved by the Dean and Chapter; that no Vicar or Quirister receive or admit any Woman into his Garden, unlest in company of other honest Women, etc. All which Statutes and Ordinances with many more, filling twenty one Folio's and a half, were declared and establisht by the foresaid Dean and Chapter, and confirm'd by the Bishop in the year 1526. The Bishop of Litchfeld is sworn to defend the Rights and Liberties of this Church to his ability, to observe the Statutes and approved antient Customes of the same, and not to alienate the Episcopal Possessions. The Dean is sworn to make continual Residency as is accustomed, to be faithful to the Church, not to reveal the secrets of the Chapter, to observe and defend the Statutes, and approved and antient Customes, to behave himself with humility and Patience, and to excite all those who are Subject to his Government to do the like. Every Canon is sworn to be obedient to the Dean and Chapter in Canonical Commands,

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to defend the Rights and Liberties of this Church, to observe the Statutes and antient and approved Customes, to be faithtul to the Church and not to reveal the Secrets of the Chapter. Every Vicar is sworn to be obedient to the Dean and Chapter, to be faithful, to perform the Day and Night Service according to his reasonable ability. The Sergeant is sworn to be true to the Church of Litchfeild, to keep Council, truly to do his Office of Sergeantship, and when he is sent on Errands to give a true Report, etc.

LINCOLN Cathedral.

PAulinus Archbishop of York, who converted a great part of the North among the rest converted to the Christian Religion the Prefect of the City of Lincoln call'd Bletta, and caused a Church to be erected, and therein consecrated Honorius Archbishop of Canterbury.

Anno 1092. Bishop Remigius removed his Episcopal Seat from Dorchester by Licence of King William the Conqueror to Lincoln, and began to build there a sumptuous Church, on the Hill near the Castle, but Thomas then Archbishop of York pretending that Lincoln and all the Province of Lindsey was within his Diocess, gave some obstruction for a while. But it was afterwards finisht by King William II. who caused it to be dedicated by two Cardinal Legates, in the presence of eight Archbishops and sixteen Bishops, and secular Canons to be establisht therein. This King William Rufus Confirm'd all the Lands and Revenues which his Father had given to this Church, and was himself a great Benefactor, he quieted the Dispute between the Archbishop of York and the Bishop of Lincoln, about Jurisdiction, giving Thomas Archbishop of York such satisfaction to quit his Claim for ever, as has been already mention'd, page 131. King Henry I. gave to this Church among other Lands the Mannour of Bicheleswade with great Liberties, also a Fair to be held at their Castle of Newark, on St. Mary Magdalens day and four days before; he also granted to Robert Bishop of Lincoln Liberty to make a Passage through his Castle Wall, he also granted to the said Bishop and the Canons of this Church his Vineyard at Lincoln and all that belongs to it. He also granted them several Churches, as Hempingham, Derby, Wercheford, to be Prebends, with all the Churches of Lincoln within and without the Borough, and Freewarren in all their Lands in Lincolnshire and Notttinghamshire. King Henry II. granted and confirm'd to Robert Bishop of Lincoln and his Successors the Houses that were the Knights Templers in the Parish of St. Andrew Holburn, at London, which the said Bishop had purchased of those Knights for one hundred marks, and the yearly Rent of three pieces of Gold (tres aureos). The same King gave to this Church and Bishop all the ground from the Bale Westward to the City Wall Eastward, at Lincoln, to build on; he also confirm'd the Donations of their other Benefactors, he also composed a difference between the Bishop of Lincoln, and Robert Abbot of St. Albans about the Jurisdiction over fifteen Churches to the said Abby belonging. Pope Honorius Anno 1125. confirm'd the Revenues given to this Church; the like did Pope Innocent, who also granted that no Bishop should be imposed on this Church of Lincoln without the free election of the Clergy and People, Anno 1138. King Henry III. in the fortieth year of his Reign upon the Petition of the Dean and Canons of Lincoln for his Licence

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to remove some part of the City Wall, that so they might enlarge their Church Eastward, issued out a Writ of Quod damnum, in order to the same.

The names of the Deans of Lincoln.

Ralf Ramerus.
Simon Bloet, Anno Dom. 1100.
Adelmus, 1162.
Hamo.
Jeffry Killing.
Roher de Rolveston, 1198.
William de Tornaco, 1227.
Roger de Wescham, 1237. after Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield.
Henry de Lenington, 1243. after Bishop of Lincoln.
Richard de Gravesend, 1254. after Bishop of Lincoln.
Robert de Mariscis, 1260.
William de Lenington, 1262.
Richard de Mepham, 1273.
John de Maydenston, 1275.
Olive Sutton, 1276. after Bishop of Lincoln.
Nicholas de Hecham, 1280.
Philip de Willughhy, 1289.
Gotzefinus de Kyrington, 1305.
Raymundas, a Cardinal, 1307.
Roger de Martival, 1310. after Bishop of Sarum.
Henry de Mansfeild, 1315.
Anthony Beak, 1328, after Bishop of Norwich.
John de Nottingham, 1340.
William de Norwich, 1345. after Bishop of Norwich.
John de Offord, 1345.
Simon Bresley, 1348.
John de Stretley, 1364.
John de Shepy, 1388.
John Mackworth, 1412.
Robert Fleming, 1451.
George Fitzhugh, 1483.
Jeffry Simion, 1505.
Thomas Wulcy, 1509. afterwards Bishop of Lincoln, and York, and Cardinal.
John Constable, 1514.
George Heneage, 1528.
John Tayler, 1539. after Bishop of Lincoln.
Mathew Parlur, (or Parker ) 1552. after ArchBishop of Canterbury.
Francis Mallet, 1554.
John Whitgift, 1571. after Bishop of Worcester, and Archbishop of Canterbury.
William Wicham, 1577. after Bishop of Lincoln and Winchester.
Ralf Griffin, 1585.
John Rainold, 1598.
William Cole, 1599.
Laurence Staunton, 1601.
Roger Parlur, 1613.
Anthony Topham, 1629.
Michael Honywood, 1660.

Anno 1536. (28. Henry VIII.) An Inventory was made of all the Jewels, Vestments, and other Ornaments belonging to the Revestry of of this Church, consisting in Chalices, in number six, one of which was all Gold enricht with Pearls and divers precious stones in the foot, weighing thirty two Ounces, Several rich Feretrums, one of Silver and gilt for the Sacrament, weighing 341. ounces, several rich Philatories, Ampuls, and Tabernacles with Relicks in them, Rich Images Silver and gilt, Divers Rich Chests for Relicks, Pixes, Crosses and Crucifixes some of Gold some of Christial, and some of Silver and gilt, one of which weighed 128 Ounces besides the Baes, etc. Divers Rich Candlesticks, among which one Pair of extraordinary size and Workmanship was all Gold, and weigh'd 450 Ounces, the gift of John Duke of Lancaster Son of King Edw. III. Five Pair of Censors Silver and gilt. Several rich Basons Silver and gilt, etc. Pastoral Staves, Texts of the Gospells with Rich Covers,

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Chrismatories and Ampuls for Oyl Silver and gilt, eight Myters, Chesables and Copes of Cloath of Gold, Sattin, Velvet, imbroidered, red, white, some of Damask, some set with Pearls, of purple and blew, some of which had the Donors names imbroidered thereon, with Orate pro anima, etc., of green, of black, rich Morses of Silver and gilt, Garlands of Silver and gilt, set about with precious Stones and Pearls, rich Altarcloaths of Cloth of Gold and images imbroidered, etc. King Henry VIII. directed his Letter dated the 6th of June in his two and thirtieth year, to Dr. George Heneage then Archdeacon of Taunton, and others, to take down a Shrine, and the superstitious Jewels, Plate, Copes, etc., in this Cathedral Church of Lincoln, and to see the same safely and surely to be convey'd to his Jewel-house in the Tower. Which Commission was executed on the 11th of June 1540. And by force thereof there was taken out of the said Cathedral in Gold two thousand six hundred and twenty one ounces, in silver four thousand two hundred and eighty five ounces, besides a great number of Pearls, Diamonds, Saphires, Rubies, Turky, Carbuncles, etc. The Bishop of Lincoln had a Miter wonderfully thick set with precious Stones. Here were then two Shrines, one of St. Hugh all of Gold, the other of St. John of Dalderby all of Silver.

In the seventh year of King Edward the VI. another Inventory was taken of what then remain'd in this Church, which contain'd only three Chalices, one Pix, one Ampul, and that was all the Plate, the rest of the Treasure was in Copes of red, green, blew, black and white, some old and decayed, with divers Chesables, Tunicles, and Albes, etc. Altar Cloaths of Diaper meetly good, and five other Cloths of Diaper fore worne.

In the fourth and fifth Ph. Ma. Anno Dom. 1557. another Inventory was made, and there was then in this Church seven Chalices Silver and gilt, one of which weighed four and thirty ounces, four Pixes with some few Phials, Crosses, Censers, Ampulls, but most poor, with divers Chesables and Copes, red, purple, white, blew, green and black, and divers Altar-Clothes, some of Cloath of Gold, and of Damask imbroidered with Gold, etc.

St. PAUL's Cathedral, in London.

ANno Dom. 185. Lucius King of the greater Britain, now call'd England, obtain'd from Pope Eleutherius, two Doctors to be sent hither to instruct the King and Kingdom in the Christian Faith; then were the Temples of Idols dedicated to the Service of the true God, and three Metropolitan Seats placed in the three chief Cities, viz., London, to which all the Southern part of England was subject; York, under whose jurisdiction was all the North of Humber, and Scotland; and Cehster, whose Jurisdiction extended over Wales. London continued the chief Episcopal Seat and Primacy, till the coming of St. Augustin, who in the year 604. transerr'd the Metropolitan Dignity to Canterbury; and made Mellitus Bishop of London. To which Mellitus, King Ethelbert gave the Land then called Tillingham, for the Support and Maintenance of his Monastery of St. Paul. Pope Agatho granted to Erkenwald Bishop of the Monastery of St. Paul in London, that the Election of the Bishop should belong solely to

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the Congregation of that Monastery. Which Erkenwald was a Scholler to Bishop Mellitis, and built two Monasteries, one for himself at Cheetsey in Sussex, the other for his Sister Edleburga at Barking in Essex. He was a man of most exemplary Piety, and after the death of Bishop Cedde, became Bishop of London. He died at Barking; after whose death his Body was much contested for, by the Nuns of Barking, the Monks of Chertsey, and the Citizens of London, but the latter prevailed, and he was buried at London, with the Reputation of a Saint. King Athelstan renew'd and restored the Liberties of the Monastery of St. Paul the Doctor of the Gentiles, in London. King Edgar granted to the same, divers Lands and Immunities, in the year 867. Other Benefactors to this Church were King Ethelred, Cnute King of Denmark and England, King Edward the Confessor, King William the Conqueror, who confirm'd all their Lands and Liberties to be as free as he desired his own Soul to be in the day of Judgment; he also granted and confirm'd the four and twenty Hides of Land adjoyning to the City of London, which King Ethelbert gave to this Church when he founded it. It appears by Domesday-Book that at the time of the Conquest, the Church of St Paul's held Lands in the Counties of Middlesex, Essex in divers Hundreds there, Hertford, and Surrey. Anno 1070. A Provincial Council was assembled in the Church of St. Paul at London under Lanfranc Archbishop of Canterbury, where among other things it was decreed that none should marry in his own Kindred till the seventh Degree; That none should buy or sell holy Orders, or an Ecclesiastical Office with cure of Souls, which crime St. Peter first condemn'd in Simon Magus; and that no Bishop or any of the Clergy should judge in loss of Life or Limb. In those times it was proved, and declared, that the Church of York ought to be subject to that of Canterbury. The foresaid King William granted to Maurice Bishop of London the Castle of Stortford and other Lands with Soc and Sac.

In the year 1295. A Visitation was made in the Treasury of this Church, by Ralph de Baudak, then Dean, and an Inventory taken containing divers rich and curious Morses, some all of Gold, Silver Candlesticks, Silver Censers, rich Crosses of Silver, and Silver and gilt, twelve rich Chalices, some of which were all Gold, whereof one weighed five and thirty ounces 10d. weight, divers rich Feretrums, divers rich Miters adorned with Pearls and precious Stones, Sandals of Silk imbroider'd, Pastoral Staves, abundance of Copes, imbroider'd with Images, and enricht with Gold and Silver, Amicts some of Cloath of Gold, divers Vestments, Tunicks and Dalmaticks, etc. Church Books as Psalters, Antiphonaries, Homelies, Martyrolgies, Processionals, Missals, Manuals, Graduals, etc. Epistolaries, and Gospellaries, etc. Also a Chronicle composed by Ralph de Diceto, etc. Baudekins, and other sorts of Cloaths; there was also an Inventory taken of such things as belong'd to the Chappel of the Charnel-house in St. Paul's Church-yard; in the Chappel of St. Radegund; at our Ladies Altar in the Nave of the Church; at the Altar of St. Steven, at that of St. Thomas the Martyr, of St. Silvester, of St. Cedde, of the Apostles, of St. James, of St. John Baptist, of the blessed Virgin in the new Work, of St. Michael, of St. John the Evangelist, of St. Catherine, of St. Andrew, of St. Laurence over against the Sacristy; and in the year 1298. a like Inventory was taken of all the Plate, Vestments, and Books belonging to the Church of St. Faith in the Vaults under St. Pauls. Ralph de Diceto once Dean of St. Paul's gave to this

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Church divers Relicks, beside which there were divers others, among the rest the Cheek-bone of St. Ethelbert the Confessor, Founder of this Church, and an Arm of St. Mellitus, etc.

The Bishop of London is, at his first coming to St. Paul's Cathedral, and at his coming from beyond Seas, to be received by the Dean and Choire at the West-Door, in solemn Procession and ringing of Bells, at other times with ringing of Bells only. He ought to administer in Person on Christmas, Easter, Ascention, and Whitsundays, and on the Feasts of St. Paul and St. Erknewald, Ashwenesday, and Corpus Christi: He is to dispose of all the Thirty Prebends and Dignities of this Church, when void, except the Deanery, but they are to be admitted into Possession and inducted by the Dean and Chapter. The Principal Persons in this Church next the Bishop are the Dean, the Archdeacons of London, Essex, Middlesex, and Colchester, the Treasurer, Precentor, and Chancellor. The Dean is chosen by the Chapter, and then presented to, and confirm'd by the Bishop, and by him also, or his Deputy, install'd; his Office is to reside, to govern over all the Canons, Priests, and other Ministers of this Church, to asemble a Chapter every Saturday; he is to invest the Canons, the rest of the Canons Residentiary being present; and ought to visit within the Jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter every third year. The Sub-dean is chosen from among the petty Canons, his Office is to govern the Quire in the absence of the Dean. Two others of the petty Canons are to be chosen who are call'd Cardinals of the Quire, their Office is to observe the defaults of all that belong to the Quire, and to present the same, etc. The Treasurer's Office is to keep the Plate, Vestments, Relicks, etc., of the Church, under him is the Sacristan, who is his Coadjutor; under the Sacristan are three Virgers, who ought to serve in Person all three daily; their Office is to open and shut the Church-Doors; to ring the Bells at accustomed hours; to see that no one be cover'd; to keep out of the Church infamous Persons, especially publick Whores, Porters carrying burdens through the Church, importunate Beggars; to be single and not married, etc. The Office of the Chantor is to take care of the Song and Singers, to begin the Antiphons, etc. His Deputy is call'd the Succentor; the Chancellor is the Scribe of the Church and Chapter, he has the custody of the Seal, he Presides over the reading part, as the Chantor does over the singing part of the Choire, and he appoints the Master of the Grammar- School as the Chantor does of the Song School; and the Chancellor hath under him a Subscribe or Register. The Almoner of this Church ought to educate eight Boys of honest Parentage, and cause them to be instructed in Song and Learning, so as to be useful to God's Service in the Choire. Under the Dean are thirty Canons in the Church of St. Paul instituted by Pope Lucius the III. these were of old time Regulars according to the Rule of St. Augustin, and all constantly resided, but in process of time they became Seculars, and neglected their Residence, to reform which several Orders were provided by several Bishops and Deans, out of which Dean Collet collected the Sum, viz., that every Canon at the time of his Installation shall swear on the Evangelists to be obedient to the Dean and Chapter, to be faithful to the Church of St. Paul, to defend her Rights and Liberties, to observe her laudable Customs, etc. Every Canon shall diligently observe the Canonical Hours, and humbly and devoutly perform the Divine Office, etc. A Canon Residentiary is so call'd from his

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duty to be continually residing, which he ought solemnly to promise in the Chapter before all the Brethren; if after which promise he resides in any other Church, he shall lose the profit and advantage of this. To reaside in the Church of Pauls is to be present at the Canonical hours, on great Feasts at every Office, on other days at some one; the Vicars of this Church were formerly thirty in number, every Canon had his Vicar, but in Dean Collets time there were but six, some of which were married, they ought to officiate constantly in the Quire day and night, they ought not to be Proctors or Attorneys, etc. The Petty, or Minor Canons, were to be Priests who daily attended the Service of the Quire, and said Masses at the high Altar instead of the Canons, etc. Here were also divers other Priests who had Chantries and celebrated at particular Altars; but these used to assist in the Quire, especially on the greater Feasts, at Mattins, Prime, Mass, and Vespers; and they could not be otherways Beneficed, etc. King Richard II. in the two and twentieth year of his Reign, direcred his Letters to the Bishop of London, and Dean and Residentaries (or Stagiaries) of this Church, commanding that the Residency in this Church be for the future observed according to the form and manner of the Church of Salisbury. The Thirty Canons belonging to this Church, had each his several Prebend, and peculiar Seat in the Quire, and to each belonged certain Psalms to be by him said daily for the living and dead Benefactors to this Church, which Psalms were writ over his Stall.

Anno Dom. 1518. John Collet Dean of St. Paul's exhibited certain matters to the Cardinal of York, Legate a Latere, for the Reformation of the State of the Residentaries, consisting of several Heads, relating to the Dean and his authority, the four Residentiaries, and their Behaviour in the Quire, etc. Of the Chapters. That the Residentaries live near the Church, and that they admit no Women into their Houses, of the distributions among the Residentaries, and that the Dean have a double Proportion in all things without fraud; of divers other Officers belonging to this Church, relating to the Temporalties, as the Receiver General, Chamberlain, Steward of the Courts, Auditor of Accounts, etc. Thomas Archbishop of York and Chancellour of England decreed by consent of the Dean and Chapter, that the number of Residentiaries should not exceed four with their Dean, at one time. The State of the Lands of this Church, amounted to the Sum of 1196 l. 11s. 2d. q. per Annum besides Casualties, as Fines, etc. Out of which Sum went yearly in Charges and payments 791 l. 3s. 9d. So that there remain'd 405 l. 7s. 3d. q. and out of that they Set off for Reparations 200 l. and for Casualties 26 l. 14s. 4d. Remaineth 178 l. 13s. 11d. q.

The Names of the Thirty Prebendaries of St. Paul's are; Totehal, Wesden, Holburn, Wildeland, Sneating, Kentistown, Ruculnesland, Wilesdon, Wenlakesbyri, Kadington, Portepole, Cudington, Cheswicke, Twiford, Brandeswood, St. Pancrace, Ealdeland, Herlestone, Chaumberlengeswood, Ealdstreet, Oxgate, Consumpta, Brunnesbury, Neweton, Hoxton, Rugemere, Iseldon, Mapelsbyri, More, Halywell.

To the Patronage of the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, belong twenty one Churches in the City of London.

In the seventh of Edward VI. an Inventory of the Plate and Ornaments etc., of this Church was delivered into the Kings Commissioners at Guildhall, out of which at the request of the Dean and Chapter, they left only three Chalices, two pair of Basins, a Silver Pot, a Canopy for the King

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when he cometh to Paul's, two Palls for Funerals, twenty four old Cushions, etc., as things of necessary use.

In the year 1430. (9. Henry VI.) John Carpentor, Citizen and Clerk of the Communalty of London, Executor of Richard Whytington, late Citizen and Mercer, and often Mayor of the said City, founded a perpetual Chantry of one Chaplain to celebrate daily in the Chappel of the Blessed Mary formerly built over the Charnel House in St. Paul's Churchyard, by Roger Beyvene and other Citizens of London, and endow'd the same with eight Marks of yearly Rent, etc. Anno Dom. 1458. An Inventory or Catalogue, Indented, was made by William Say Dean and the Chapter of St. Paul's of all the Books given by Walter Shirington a Canon Residentiary of this Church, and placed in a new Library by him erected over the Cloyster about the Church-yard call'd Pardon Chirche-hawre. Which Library consisted of many Volumes, among which, Chronica Radulphi de Diceto; Postilla Radulphi di Dicetosuper Ecclesiasticum, & librum Sapientiae; The Works of St. Augustin; and of St. Thomas; Visio Sancti Edwardi Consessoris; Una Magna Biblia; Tractatus Magistri Roberti Grostest in gallico, di lapsu & reparatione generis humani; Tractatus de decimis per Dominum Stephanum quondam Archiepiscopum Cantuar, etc. There were also divers other Books remaining in the Treasury, Anno 1486. relating chiefly to the Church Service, among which Vetus Missale secundum usum St. Paul's; Unum Ordinale secundum primariam ordinationem, & antiquam, Ecclesiae S. Pauli Londoniensis, etc.

The Names of the Bishops of London.

Mellitus consecrated by Augustin Archbishop of Canterbury, Anno 605.
Ceddus, 611.
Wyne.
Erkenwald, 680.
Walter.
Inguald.
Egulf
Wychet.
Filbrith.
Edgar.
Kenwald.
Ebald
Herbert.
Osmund.
Ethenod.
Celbert.
Cenulph
Stributulph.
Erstan.
Wulfius.
Edelward.
Elstan.
Wlstan.
Bisun, 1000.
Arwyn, 1044.
Elphword.
Robert, 1050.
William, 1051.
Hugh de Aurevalls.
Mauricius, 1077.
Richard, 1108.
Gilbert.
Robert de Sigillo, 1139.
Richard Beumies, 1151.
Gilbert Foliot, 1163.
Richard, 1190.
William, 1199.
Eustachius de Faukenbergh, 1221.
Roger le Veir, 1229.
Fulc Basset, 1244.
Henry de Wengham, 1259.
Richard Taleboth, 1262.
Henry de Sandwic, 1262.
John de Chishull, 1274.
Richard de Gravesend, 1290.
Ralph de Baldok, 1306.
Gilbert de Seagrave, 1313.
Richard de Newport, 1317.
Steven de Gravesend, 1319.
Richard de Binteworth, 1338.
Ralph de Stratford, 1339.

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Michael Northburgh.
Simon de Sudbury, 1362.
Robert Braybroke, 1381.
Roger Walden, 1404.
Nicholas Bubwith, 1406.
Richard Clifford, 1407.
John Kemp, 1422.
William Gray, 1426.
Robert Fitz-Hugh, 1431.
Robert Gilbert.
Thomas Kemp, 1449.
Richard Hill, 1489.
Thomas Savage, 1496.
William Warham, 1503.
William Barnes, 1505.
Richard Fitz-James, 1506.
Cuthbert Tunstal, 1522.
John Stokesly, 1530.
Edmund Boner, 1540.
Nicholas Ridley, 1549.
Edmund Grindal, 1559.
Edwin Sandes, 1570.
John Elmer, 1576.
Richard Fletcher, 1594.
Richard Bancroft, 1597.
Richard Vaughan, 1604.
Thomas Ravis, 1607.
George Abbot, 1609.
John King, 1611.
George Mountaine, 1621.
William Laud, 1628.
William Juckson, 1635.

The Names of the Deans of St. Pauls since the Conquest.

Ulfstan.
William.
Elfwin.
Luired.
Ralph, 1150.
Alard de Burnham.
Robert de Watford.
Hugh de Marinis.
Ralph de Diceto, 1183.
Martin de Pateshull.
Walter de Langford.
Jeffrey de Lucy, 1237.
William de S. Mariae Ecclesia, 1237.
Henry de Cornhill, 1245.
Walter de Salern.
Robert de Barthone.
Peter de Neuport.
Richard Taleboth.
Jeffrey de Feringes, 1263.
John de Chishulle.
Hervicus de Borham, 1276.
Thomas de Ingelesthorpe, 1279. after Bishop of Rochester.
Roger dela Leye, 1287.
William de Montfort, 1292.
Ralph de Baldok, 1297.
Arnold de Cantilupo, 1308. after a Cardinal.
John de Sandale.
Richard de Neuport.
Vitalis Basco.
John de Everton, 1328.
Gilbert de Bruera, 1339.
Richard de Kilmington.
Thomas Trillek.
John de Apelby.
Thomas Evere.
Thomas Stowe.
Thomas More.
Reginald Kentwode.
Thomas Lyseus, 1441.
Laurance Bothe, 1456.
William Say, 1457.
Roger Ratclyff, 1468.
Thomas Wynterburne, 1471.
William Worsley.
Robert Shirburne.
John Collet.
Richard Pace.
Richard Sampson.
John Incent.
William May.
John Fecknam.
Henry Cole.
Alexander Nowell.
John Overall.
Valentine Cary.

The Dance of Death (formerly painted about the Cloyster of St. Pauls) was writ in French by one Machabree, and translated into old English Verse by Dan John of Lydgate, Monk of Bury. In this Dance Death leads all sorts of People, and first takes out, and speaks to the Pope, then the

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Emperor, then the Cardinal, the King, Patriarch, Constable, Archbishop, Baron, Princess, Bishop, Esquire, Abbot, Abbess, Bayly, Astronomer, Burgess, Canon Secular, Marchant, Chartreux, Sergeant, Monk, Udurer, Physician, the amorous Esquire, the Gentlewoman, the Man of Law, Mr. John Rikil, the Parson, Juror, Minstral, Laborer, Frier Minor, the young Child, the young Clerk, the Hermite, to all which Death makes a short address and they as short an answer, with the Author's Moral Reflection.

The Cathedral Church of Salisbury.

OSmund Bishop of Salisbury, who succeeded on the death of Bishop Hermon in the year 1076, built the new Church at Salisbury, and composed the Book of the Ecclesiastical Office call'd Consuetudinarium, which was used, in a manner, throughout all England, Wales, and Ireland. Bishop Osmund's Deed of Foundation and Endowment of this Church bears date. Anno Dom. 1091. (4. William 2.) King Henry the I. King Henry the II. and King John were Benefactors to this Church of St. Mary of Sarum. King Henry the III. in the eleventh year of his Reign confirm'd the translation of this Church from the Castle to a lower Scituation, and made New Saresburie a free City, and granted to it all the Liberties which the City of Winchester enjoys, and granted to the Bishops here a yearly Fair at New Saresbury from the Vigil of the Assumption to the morrow after the Octaves of the said Feast, and every Week a Mercate on the Tuesday, etc.

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COLLEGIATE CHURCHES

Of Canons Secular.

A Second Part of the Third Volume.

BEVERLEY, in Yorkshire.

[Provosts of Beverley. Vol. I. p. 171.]

1. Thomas, Nephew of Thomas Archbishop of York.
2. Thurstinus, afterwards Archbishop of York.
3. Thomas Normanus.
4. Robertus.
5. Thomas Beket.
6. Robertus.
7. Galfridus, Temp. H. 2.
8. Simon.
9. Fulco Basset.
10. Johannes Cheshub.
11. Gulielmus Eborisensis, Temp H. 3.
12. Johannes Maunsel.
13. Alanus.
14. Morganus.
15. Petrus de Chester.
16. Haymo de Charto.
17. Robert de Alburwik.
18. Walterus.
19. Gulielmus de Melton.
20. Nicholaus Hugate.
21. Gulielmus de la Mar. Temp. E. 3.
22. Richard de Ravensar.
23. Adam Limbergh.
24. Johannes Thoresby.
25. Johannes Manseld.
26. Gulielmus Kinwolmarsh.
27. Robertus Nevile, Temp. H. 6.
28. Robertus Rolleston.
29. John Gerningham.
30. Laurence Bouthe, afterwards Bishop of Durham.
31. John Bouth, afterwards Bishop of Exeter.
32. Henry Webber.
33. Petrus Tastar.
34. William Potman,
35. Hugh Trotter.
36. ...
37. Thomas Dalby.
38. Thomas Winter.

IN the year 1664. certain Relicks were found in a Leaden Chest in this Church, with an Inscription which spoke them to be the Bones of St. John of Beverley therein deposited in the year 1197.

King Adelstan in his march against Constantine King of Scotland, visited the blessed John at Beverley, and promised, in case he obtain'd Victory, to augment the Revenues of this Church, which he did in his return. Being in Scotland, he besought God that at the Prayer of St. John of Beverley, he would shew some sign whereby the Scots maybe known to be of right subject to England, hereupon the King struck a Stone with his Sword, near the Castle of Dunbar, and made therein a gash of an Ell long. King Richard the II. in the twelfth year of his Reign, confirm'd to this Church, certain Revenues given by King Athelstan, in the

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 305

East-Riding of Yorkshire; the like had been done before by King Henry the II. Thomas Archbishop of York, by advice and consent of the Chapter of this Church, made divers Statutes and Orders for Government of the same; namely, that there be always nine Canons, a Precentor, a Chancellor, and a Sacristan, nine Vicars, etc., belonging to this Church, in the number of which Canons, the Archbishop himself is included for one, and hath the chief and first Stall in the Choire; that the Provostship (which Office is only temporary) when void, if not supplied in forty days, shall be collated by the Archbishop and his Successors, etc. That all beside the Canons be obliged to continual Residence; That the Provost for the time being pay to each of the nine Canons the Sum of 10 l. per Annum, by quarterly Payments; to the Precentor 10 l. to the Chancellor, and Sacristan, as formerly; to the Clerks and Virgers 6s. 8d. each, and to the Parsons 6 l. 13s. 4d. each, and further to each of the nine Canons and three Officers above-mentioned, two and forty quarters of Oats yearly; to each Vicar 8 l. per Annum, etc. That the Provost makes due and punctual Payment of the Sums due to the Ministers of this Church at the proper times or within fifteen days after, under pain of five Marks to the Fabrick of the Church of York, and as much to this, etc. Which Statutes bear date in the year 1391.

SUTHWELL, in Nottinghamshire.

AT the time of Domesday Survey, Thomas then Archbishop of York, and the Canons of this Church, held Lands in Torgartone Wapentac, valued at 40 l. 15s. and in Binghamhou Wapentac other Lands, amounting in value to 150s. Turstan Archbishop of York gave one Prebend to this Church, and the tenth of all the Increase of his Lordship of Southwell. Pope Alexander the III. granted to the Canons of St. Mary of Southwell Power to excommunicate any of their Parishoners, who should be injurious to them; and that as well the Clerks as Laity of the County of Nottingham do repair to this Church in Procession, at Whitsuntide, yearly, according to ancient Custom, etc. Whose Bull bears date, Anno Dom. 1171. King Henry the I. confirmed the Liberties of this Church, and the Lands given them by Archbishop Turstan. John Archbishop of York, and Robert Malluvell, were Benefactors to this Church. Alexander Archbishop of York and Legate, at the Petition of Richard de Chesterfeild Canon of the Collegiate Church of Suthwelle, in the year 1379. granted his License for the building of a new House for the Habitation of the Vicars in the Church yard, their old House being too remote; which House was afterwards set out and appointed by the Parishoners to be erected in the East part of the said Church-yard. King Henry the VI. in the seventeenth year of his Reign granted to this Church the Alien Priory of Ravendale in Lincolnshire, then valued at 14 l. per Annum. Which with other Lands, was also granted to this Church, by King Edward the IV. in the first year of his Reign.

This Collegiate Church being founded anew by King Henry VIII. Queen Elizabeth in the twenty seventh year of her Reign confirm'd and establisht certain Statutes and Orders for Government of the same, consisting of twenty six Chapters, in which it is provided that Divine Service be

306 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

perform'd here as in the Metropolitan Church of York, thrice every day, and Sermons by the Canons or Prebendaries every Sunday and Holyday; that there be at least six Vicars Choral, six singing Men, and six Boys; That the Canons shall duly reside, and that the Debts of the Colledge be paid; that the Receiver account yearly on the 3d. or 4th. of November; That there be a Sacristan, Virger, Bell-ringer, and Porter, a Malter, and Rector of the Choire, a Master of the Grammar-School; That to make a Chapter there must be present three Canons at the least; that there be a Warden or Clerk of the Fabrick, who is to take care of the Repairs of the Church; that the Seal be kept under three Keys remaining with three several Prebendaries; that there be Divinity Lectures thrice, or at least twice a week, and Catechising on Sundays in the Afternoon; That the Chapter constitute under them a Vicar general, for the Exercise of their Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction, and a Register; Every Canon before his Instalment to take an Oath whereby he renounces the Papistical Worlship, and engages to embrace the Doctrine establisht by the regal authority, etc., and to observe the Statutes of this Church; The Vicars and under Officers to be sworn to the same purpose.

[Valued at 16 l. 5s. 2d. per Annum.]

St. MARTINS LE GRAND, in London.

KIng William the Conqueror (consanguinitatis hereditate Anglorum Bastileus) confirm'd the Lands and Estate given to this Colledge by Ingelricus, and Girardus his Brother, the Founders, and further gave to the same all the More- Land without Criplegate, etc. And freed this Church and the Canons here from all disturbance and exaction of any Bishop, Archdeacen, or their Ministers, and from all Regal Services. And granted them Soc and Sac, Tol and theam, with all those antient Liberties, etc., in the fullest manner that any Church in England hath. Whose Charter bears date in the year 1068. the Second year of his Reign. Confirm'd by John and Peter Cardinals of Rome, and Legates of Pope Alexander.

St. MARY'S at Warwick.

HEnry Consul, or Earl, of Warwick, gave divers Lands to this Church, confirm'd and augmented by Earl Roger, his Son. The same Roger granted to the Canons of this Church of St. Mary to have a Dean and Chapter, in like manner as the Canons of London, Lincoln, Salisbury, and York. He also in the year 1123, translated the Colledge which was in the Castle of Warwick to the Church of St. Mary and All Saints, and by and with the Episcopal authority of Simon Bishop of Worcester, the Canons and Clerks were transferr'd thither. The same Simon consecrated an Altar at St. Sepulchers, and a Burial Place there for the Canons only, the same being call'd the Priory of the Holy Sepulcher. To this Collegiate Church the aforemention'd Roger Earl of Warwick gave several Churches, among others, the Church of the Holy Sepulcher at Warwick, and the Parish Church of Greetham in Rutland; Which Churches being alienated from this Colledge; the said Church of St. Sepulchers being made a Priory of Canons Regular, and Greetham appropriated to the same, those two were not in a Possibility to be restored, but the other Churches which had

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 307

been alienated, seven in number, were restored and reunited to the Collegiate Church of St. Mary at Warwick, by Decree of William Bishop of Worcester; and all the Parishoners of the several Churches in Warwick order'd to repair to the said Church of St. Mary for Sacraments and Sacramentals, and not to bury elswhere than in the Church-yard of the same. The said William Bishop of Worcester decree'd that the Dean, who is bound by this Place to reside, receive 40 l. every residing Canon, twenty marks every other Prebend who does not reside but 40s. only, and every Vicar ten marks, per Annum.

[Valued at 247 l. 13s. ob. per Annum.]

WALLINGFORD, in Barkshire.

IN the tenth year of Edward I. Edmund Son of Richard King of the Almains, and Earl of Cornwall, gave to the Chappel of St. Nicholas in his Castle of Wallingford 40 l. of yearly Rent, for the maintenance of six Chaplains, six Clerks, and four Acolyts or Taber-bearers. To the Dean and Chaplains of this Colledge, Edward the Black Prince, King Richard II. and King Henry VI. gave other Revenues in augmentation of their Endowment.

[Valued at 147 l. 8s. ob. q. per Annum.]

LANGADANC, in the Diocess of St. Davids.

ANno Dom. 1283, Thomas Bishop of St. Davids, with the Assent of King Edward, and the Chapter of St. Davids, made the Church of Langadanc Collegiate, and endow'd the same with Revenues for the maintenance of twenty one Canons under the Government of a Precentor, of which Canons seven to be Priests, seven Deacons, and seven Subdeacons, each Canon to have his Vicar, etc.

LANGECESTRE, in the County Palatine of Durham.

ANno Dom. 1283. Anthony Bishop of Durham made the Church of Langecestre, lying in his Diocess, and being of his Patronage, a Collegiate Church for one Dean and seven Prebendaries, the Dean to be continually resident and to have the Cure of Souls, and to find two Chaplains to assist him therein, and to cause three Chappels of ease to be served with competent Ministers, that the seven Prebendaries have their several Vicars, that every of them be Hebdomodarius in his turn, to order, correct, and govern the Choire. He also endow'd the Church with divers Revenues, etc. All which was by consent of this Chapter of Durham, and confirm'd by King Edward I.

308 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

AUKLAND, in the Bishoprick of Durham.

TO this Collegiate Church of St. Andrew of Aukland, the foresaid Anthony Bishop Durham had been a Benefactor, and made divers Orders for Government of the same in the year 1292. as that the Vicar of the Church be a Dean, that the Canons have all Vicars daily to officiate, the five first Canons, Priest Vicars, the four next, Deacon-Vicars, the others, Subdeacons; that the Divine Offices be sung according to the use of York, or Salisbury, etc. To which Orders Thomas Bishop of Durham, in the year 1418. made some alterations and additions, namely, that every Prebendary of this Collegiate Church do personally reside, and be present at the daily Offices, or provide a sufficient Vicar to do it for him, that the Priest-Vicars have ten marks per Annum, the Deacon-vicars seven marks per Annum, etc. That Mattins be not said at Midnight, but in the Morning, for the conveniency of the Parishioners, etc.

CESTRE, in the County Palatine of Durham.

THE before mention'd Anthony Bishop of Durham, in the year 1286. perceiving the Parish of this place to be large, and the Revenues of this Church to be sufficient to maintain many Ministers, made it Collegiate; to consist of one Dean and seven Prebends, that the Dean have the cure of Souls in the Parish and be continually resident, etc., with other Orders, as he before made in the case of Langecesire abovemention'd, mutatis mutandis. That the tenth part of the Portion of every non-Resident, be given to the Residents, and in case there be no Residents, then to the use of the Church, or of the Poor. All which was confirm'd by King Edward I.

St. ELISABETH's, near Winchester.

JOhn de Pontisaria Bishop of Winchester, founded this Chappel of St. Elizabeth daughter of the King of Hungary, before the Gate of his Castle of Wolvesay, and therein establisht seven Chaplains, of which one to be Provost, and six Clerks, three of which to be Deacons, and three Subdeacons. The Provost, Chaplains, and Clerks, to be placed and supply'd, upon all avoidences, by the Bishop of Winchester for the time being, or his Lieutenant, the Chaplains and Clerks to have their Board from the Provost; all to live and Dyet together in the same House, every Chaplain to have a little Clerk to serve him in the Church and in his Chamber, and not to be allow'd any other Servant, that constantly at day break they rise and repair to the Chappel, there say first the Mattins of the Blessed Virgin with a low voice, and then sing the Mattins of the day, etc., that in all the Divine Offices they observe the Salisbury use; that no Woman shall enter into any part of the House except the Chappel and the Hall; the Provost and every Chaplain and Clerk to be sworn, at their admission, to the observance of these Orders, and to personal Residence. Which Deed of Foundation bears date in the year 1301 (30. Edward I.), Simon de Farham, and divers others were Benefactors to this Chappel, and

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 309

gave Divers Mannors, Lands, and Rents to the same. All confirm'd by King Edward I. and II.

[Valued at 112 l. 17s. 4d. ob. per Annum.]

KIRKBY Super Wretheck, in Leicestershire.

ROger Beler founded a Chantry of one Custos and twelve Chaplains, in the Chappel of St. Peter adjoyning to his Mannour of Kirkeby, and endow'd the same with the Advowson of the Church of Kirkeby, the Mannour of Bokeminster, and other Lands and Rents, with Warrantry; and gave the power of presenting to the Custos or Wardens place, to the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln etc. Whose Deed of Foundation bears date in the year 1319 (15. Edward II.)

WENGHAM, in Kent.

POpe Gregory X. licenced John Archbishop of Canterbury to establish a Provost and a Colledge of ten secular Canons, in the Parish Church of Wengham, instead of a Rector, the said Provost to have the Parochial cure of Souls; which Colledge being accordingly founded by the said John, he appointed that six of the said Canons should be Priests, two Deacons and two Subdeacons, and set out their several Prebends, and how the Common distributions should be made, etc. Whose Deed of Foundation bears date, Anno Dom. 1286. and was confirm'd by King Edward I.

MEREWELL.

FOunded by Henry de Blois Bishop of Winchester for four Priests, and by him endow'd with 13 l. per Annum of Rent. Peter de Rupibus Bishop of Winchester made certain Orders for the Government of the said four Chaplains or Priests, as that they keep one Deacon to serve them in the Church and at home, that they choose yearly one of them to be their Prior, that what ever Chaplain be guilty of Incontinency or other foul crimes, he also shall be expell'd, and further granted them, besides their first endowment, fifty quarter of Corn, for their Common use, and four Load of Hay. Whose Deed bears date, Anno Dom. 1226.

GLASENEY, in Cornwall.

PEter Bishop of Exeter, in the year 1288. made a further Provision for the Vicars of this Church, first founded by his Predecessor Walter, for thirteen Canons, and as many Vicars.

[Valued at 205 l. 10s. 6d. per Annum.]

310 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

The Collegiate Church of Ruthin in Denbighshire.

JOhn Gray Lord of the Cantred of Dessencloyt in the Diocess of Bangor, instituted a Colledge in the Chappel of St. Peter at Ruthin, for at least seven Priests to celebrate there daily the Divine Offices, one of whom to serve in the Chappel of the Castle, and endow'd the same with two hundred and fifty acres of Land, with Tithes, and large Commons of Pasture, and Paunage in his Woods for sixty Hogs, etc., to hold in pure free, and perpetual Almes, with Warranty. Whose Deed of Foundation bears Date, Anno 1310.

OTERY, in Devonshire.

THe Dean and Chapter of Roan, in the year 1335 (9. Edward III.) granted, with Licence of the Apostolick see, and the King of England, their Mannour of Otery St. Mary, in the County of Devon, etc., to John de Grandisson Bishop of Exeter, and instead of Warranty they delivered up to the said Bishop all their Deeds and Writings concerning the same. King Edward III. in the eleventh year of his Reign granted his Licence to the said Bishop of Exeter to erect a Monastery or Collegiate Church to consist of a certain number of secular Canons at Otery St. Mary, either in the Parish Church there or in some other place, and to endow the same with the Mannour of Otery, and to appropriate the Tithes of the said Town to the same. Which Colledge was accordingly founded and endow'd by the said Bishop, Anno 1337.

[Valued at 303 l. 2s. 9d. per Annum.]

The Collegiate Church or Chappel of St. Steven, within the Royal Palace at Westminster.

THe Chappel of St. Steven in the Pallace at Westminster was nobly finisht by King Edward III, tho' begun by his Progenitors, which King founded therein a Dean and twelve Canons, with as many Vicars, and other Ministers accordingly, and gave them by his Patent, dated in the two and twentieth year of his Reign, his great House in Lombardstret, London, with some advowsons, obliging himself and Royal Heirs to make it up to them a Revenue of 500 l. per Annum. In the two and thirtieth year of his Reign he gave them a Tower in Bokelesbury in London, call'd Sewtes Tour, with the Appurtenances. In the three and fortieth year of his Reign he gave them another House in London call'd the Reole, with the appurtenances, then valued at 20 l. per Annum. In further augmentation of the said Foundation, he granted them all the ground from the said Chappel Northward to the receipt of the Exchequer, between Westminster Hall and the Thames, for making a Cloyster and other necessary Buildings, with free Entrance day and Night at the Gate adjoyning to the Kings Bridge, also a Chamber within the said Gate formerly belonging to his Clerk of the Kitchin, with the Houses formerly used for Stables of War-horses and other Horses, etc., with a Free Passage to the said Chappel by day light thro' the great Hall, and exempted the said Qean and Canons and all

VOL. III Collegiate Churches. 311

their Lands from the Payment of any Aydes, or Taxes whatsoever. King Richard II. compleated the full endowment of this Colledge, by settling on it divers Mannours and Lands in Kent, etc., according to the direction and desire of his Grandfather in his Testament.

[Valued at 1085 l. 10s. 5d. per Annum.]

The Royal Collegiate Chappel in the Castle at Windsor.

A Chappel for eight Canons secular having been begun in the Castle of Windsor, King Edward III. who was baptized there, finisht and compleated the same, in honour of Almighty God, his glorious Virgin Mother, St. George the Martyr, and St. Edward the Confessor, and establisht therein a Custos or President to the former eight Canons, and an addition of fifteen Canons more, and four and twenty poor Knights, with other Ministers of the said Chappel, and endow'd the same, in the two and twentieth year of his Reign with divers Churches, and promised for himself and Heirs, to encrease the Revenue to the Sum of 1000 l. per Annum.

Pope Clement the VI. granted power to the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the Bishop of Winchester, to establish the said Canons and Knights by Apostolick authority, and exempted the said Chappel and Colledge and all the members thereunto belonging from the Jurisdiction of the Archbishop or any other Bishop or Ecclesiastical Judg, and that the Custos of the same shall have perpetual Jurisdiction over the Members of the said Colledge, paying to the Apostolick Chamber one Mark Sterling on the feast of St. George, yearly. The foresaid King Edward III. granted to this Colledge divers Churches, and Revenues among other things, a Rent of one hundred marks per Annum payable by the Bailiffs of the Town of Northampton out of the Kings Farm of the said Town. King Henry IV. granted to the Custos and Canons here a void peice of Ground within this Castle near the great Hall, call'd Wodehawe, for Building Houses for the Vicars and Choristers. King Edward IV. granted and confirmed to them the Alien Priory of Okeburn with all the Lands and Churches thereunto belonging, which had been formerly granted to John Duke of Bedford by King Henry IV. late de facto & non de jure, King of England, and afterwards by the said Duke of Bedford given to this Collegiate Chappel, (the said Duke being desirous wholly to abdicate such spiritual Profits, and restore them to their pristine Nature) which gift was afterwards ratified and confirm'd by Henry V. de facto & pon de jure, King of England, non obstante the Statute of Mortmain and now by the said King Edward IV. in the first year of his Reign; Which King gave them also the Alien Priory of Uphavenne with all Rights thereunto belonging, and divers other Lands and Revenues, also the Alien Priory of Monkenlane in the County of Hereford, he also gave them the Custody and Advowson of the Hospital or Free Chappel of St. Anthony in London, and to enjoy the same with all the Estate thereunto belonging to their own proper use when it shall become void by death, resignation or otherways. He also gave them the Alien Priories of Brimefeld and Charleton, and divers other Lands in the seventeenth year of his Reign. The said King Edward IV. in the ninteenth year of his Reign (reciting the first Foundation of this Collegiate Chappel by King Edward III. and that Henry VI. de facto & non de jure King of England, in his Parliament held at Westminster in the eighth year of his

312 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

pretended Reign, had past an Act whereby he will'd and declared that this Colledge should bear the name of the Custos or Dean, and Canons of the free Chappel of St. George within his Castle of Wyndesore) did for the future incorporate them by the name of the Dean and Cannons of the Free Chappel of St. George within the Castle of Wyndesore, by that name to purchase, sue, and be sued, etc. And granted License to John Duke of Suffolk and Elizabeth his Wife to confer the Manour of Leighton-Buzzard and other Revenues on the same, and also his general Licence to all other Persons of this Kingdom of England, to grant Lands, Rents, or Advowsons, to the Dean and Canons of this Chappel to the yearly value of 500 l. the Statute of Mortmain, or any other Statute or Law notwithstanding.

In the eighth year of King Richard II. Walter Almaly being then Custos an Inventory or Register was made of all the Books, Vestments, Relicks, Chalices, etc., belonging to this Chappel Royal, in which is particular mention of divers Missales, and other Church Books, several Volumes of the Decretals, and Canon Law, etc. Vestments of different Colours, Qualites, and Richness, Copes, Coffers, Crosses, Tabernacles, Images and Relicks, adorn'd with Jewels and precious Stones, of extraordinary great value, Morses of Silver and gilt, eight Chalices, of which one of Gold and set with precious Stones, Candlesticks, Censors, Crosses, and Basons of Silver gilt, etc. Miters set with precious Stones, a Pastoral Staff, etc. A Silver Bell to ring before the Body of Christ in the Visitation of the Sick. Besides divers Jewels and Relicks in the Treasury, Three Crowns of Silver and gilt set with precious Stones one for the Blessed Mary, another for her Son, and the third for St. Edward.

RIPPON Collegiate Church.

ANno 1331. William Archbishop of York finding in his Visitation at this Church, the same almost destitute of Canons Residentiary, ordered, with consent of all Parties concern'd, that such Canons as are willing to reside and do actually reside, shall have the Profits in his Deed specified, that the Vicars shall be paid their Stipends out of the common Profits, that every Cannon Residentiary shall reside twelve weeks in the year, and that they be present at the Canonical hours in this Church, in like manner as in his Collegiate Churches of Suthwell, and Beverley. King Henry the V. in the second year of his Reign, granted that the six Vicars belonging to this Church (for whom Henry Archbishop of York proposed to build a Habitation within the Close of the Church, where they might eat and deep together) might choose among themselves a Superior by the name of Procurator, and that the said Procurator and Vicars, and their Successors, might have a Common Seal, be capable to purchase and receive Lands, and by that name to sue and be sued, etc.

[Valued at 35 l. 3s. 8d. per Annum.]

SIBETHORP, in Yorkshire.

THomas de Sibethorp Parson of the Church of Bekingham, by License of King Edward the III. (Anno Reg 10.) gave sixteen Messuages

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 313

one Toft, three Bovates, one hundred and seventy Acres of Land, fifty Acres of Meadow, and 30s. of Rent in Sibethorp, etc. to John Cosin Custos of the Chappel of the Blessed Mary of Sibethorp, for the maintenance of him and other Chaplains in the said Chappel, and Successors, and for the finding of thirty Wax-lights in the same, and a Lamp to burn before the Crucifix.

TUXFORD, in Nottinghamshire.

KING Edward the III. granted his License to John de Lungvilers to found a Colledge of five Chaplains, of which one to be Custos, in the Parsonage house of the Church of Tuxford, and to give the Advowson of that Church (which was held in Capite of the King) to the maintenance of the said five Chaplains there celebrating; But the said John not pursuing his Foundation in that manner, the said King, on his Petition, granted him a new License in the one and thirtieth year of his Reign, to give the said Advowson to the Prior and Canons of Newsted in Shirewode, for their finding five Chaplains, viz. three in the Church of Tuxford, and two in the Church of the Convent of Newsted, to celebrate for his Soul, etc.

SUDBURY, in Suffolk.

KING Edward the III. in the nine and fortieth year of his Reign, granted his License to Simon of Sudbury Bishop of London, and John his brother, to give and assign a Messuage call'd Lamberds hull, and three Shops in the Parish of St. Mary Magdalen Old Fish-street, London, to the Prioress and Convent of Nun-Eaton, in exchange for the Advowson of the Church of St. George of Sudbury, with Power to the said Bishop and his Brother to found in the said Church a Colledge to consist of certain Chapplains, of which one to be Custos or Warden. King Richard the II. in the third and seventh years of his Reign, granted to this Simon, then Archbishop of Canterbury, and John de Chertsey, License to endow the same with certain Mannors and Lands.

[Valued at 122 l. 18s. 3d. per Annum.]

ASTELEY, in Warwickshire.

SIR Thomas de Asteley, Knt. founded and endowed a Chantry in St. Mary's Chappel in the Church of Asteley, for one Warden and three other Priests, and afterwards supplicated Roger Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, that it might be made a Colledge to consist of a Dean and two Secular Canons, Priests; and it was accordingly so made by the said Bishop; and several Orders establisht, viz., that the Dean be sworn to a Personal Residence in the same, that he have for his Habitation the Rectory-house of Asteley, that he distribute to the poor 10s. yearly, that the Dean find and present to the Diocesan a perpetual Vicar to officiate in the said Church, and that he pay him the Sum of five Marks per Annum, quarterly; that he find also a Parish Chaplain, and a fitting Clark;

314 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

that he celebrate in Person on the greater Feasts, and provide Lights, etc., that he pay the Procurations and Sinodals of the said Church of Asyely, and bear all other Charges, except Books and Vestements; that every Canon find a Vicar, presentable, to whom he is to pay five Marks yearly, and one other Priest also, unless he be willing to reside himself, and celebrate Mass dayly in Person; that the Dean and Chapter have a common Seal, under the the Custody of the Dean and three Vicars, etc. Which Orders were ratifyed under the several Seals of the said Bishop, and Thomas the Founder, Anno Dom. 1343.

[Valued at 39 l. 10s. 6d. per Annum.]

COTHERSTOKE, in Northamptonshire.

KIng Edward III. in the twelfth year of his Reign, granted his Licence to John Giffard, Clerk, to give and assign the Mannour of Cotherstoke and divers other Revenues, to a Praeposit and twelve Chaplains, secular or Religious, for the maintenance of them and two Clerks daily celebrating in the said Church, to hold in free, pure, and perpetual Almes, discharged and quit of all secular exactions.

HEMMINGBURGH, in Yorkshire.

KIng Edward III. granted his Licence to the Prior and Convent of Durham to appropriate the Church of Hemmingburgh, of which they had the Advowson, to their own proper use for ever, under condition that they find a Monk or secular Chaplain to celebrate daily in the Church of Durham in a place there call'd the Galely, for the Soul of King Edward I. and his Ancestors, and two other Monks or secular Chaplains to celebrate daily, one at the Altar of St. Cuthbert there, and one in this Church of Hemmingburgh, with a certain number of Waxlights, and that they observe the Anniversary of K. Edw. III. in the Quire of their Church, yearly, and on that day distribute to one thousand poor People 1d. a peice. But this never taking effect by reason they could not obtain the Popes Licence and Confirmation for the said appropriation, King Henry VI. in the fifth year of his Reign, granted his Licence to the said Prior and Convent of Durham to erect in this Church of Hemmingburgh a Colledge to consist of one Praeposit, three Prebendary-Canons, six Vicars, and six Clerks, with other Ministers to celebrate, and observe the Anniversary abovemention'd, the said King in the Charter of Licence incorporating the said Colledge, by the name of the Praeposit or Custos, Prebendaries, Vicars, and Clerks of the Collegiate Church or Colledge of the Blessed Mary of Hemmingburgh.

[Valued at 36 l. 0s. 7d. per Annum.]

BRUSEYARD, in Suffolk.

FOunded by Matilda de Lancaster, late Countess of Ulster, but at that time a Nun in the Collegiate Church of Nuns of Campess, for five Chaplains; for whose Government William Bishop of Norwich made in

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the year 1354. the following Orders, viz. that the said five Priests sleep all in the same Dormitory, and eat together in the same Refectory; that one of the five be Custos or Master, that their habit be all alike and agreeable to the Canons, that they observe the Salisbury use in the Divine Offices; That they choose one of them for Treasurer, whose Office is to take care of all matters relating to the Chappel; That the Custos be chosen by majority of voices, and in case he be not chosen in four months time, then the Election to be in the Bishop, that turn; that the Custos being elected is to obtain the Prioress of Campesses Letters of Presentation to the Bishop, who is thereupon to confirm him in the Office; that there be a Chest with three different Keys in which the Common-Seal and Accounts are to be kept, etc.

ABERGWILLY, in the Diocess of St. Davids.

HEnry Bishop of St. Davids, in the year 1331. with the consent of the Chapter of this Collegiate Church of Abergwilly, made and created three Dignities in the same, viz., the Precentor, Chancellor, and Treasurer, and appointed certain Prebends to belong particularly to the said Offices, etc.

[Valued at 42 l. per Annum.]

ARUNDELL, in Sussex.

KIng Richard II. in the third year of his Reign granted his Licence to Richard Earl of Arundell and Surrey to found a Chantry or Colledge in the Parish Church of St. Nicholas at Arundell, without the Walls of the Castle there; which was at that time a Priory of Monks of the Order of St. Benedict sometimes belonging and Subject to the Abby of Sees in France, and which seldom or never had in it more then one Prior, and three or (at most) four Monks, with Licence to the said Prior and Monks to grant and alienate their Priory and all their Lands, etc., to the same belonging, to the said Earl, and he to confer the same on thirteen secular Chaplains, of which one to be cheif and call'd Master, therein, to be establisht, etc.

[Valued at 168 l. 7d. ob. per Annum.]

St. MICHAELS in Crooked Lane, London.

THere having been several particular Chantries in this Church, founded and endow'd with divers Rents by several Citizens of London, which were by course of time Impoverisht, William de Walworth Citizen and Merchant of London, supplicated King Richard II. that with the Rents belonging to the said Chantries and other Revenues of his own augmentation, he might found there a Colledge of one Master and nine Chaplains, to celebrate for ever, for that King, the said William, Margeret his Wife, and John Lovekyn his late Master, etsc. Which King did in the fourth year of his Reign, grant his Licence to the said William out of the special Affection which he had for his Person, and in consideration of

316 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

the laudible Service which he had often done him, to found the Colledge accordingly.

St. MARY'S, near Winchester.

KIng Richard II. in the sixth year of his Reign granted his Licence to William Wykeham Bishop of Winchester to found a Colledge, House or Hall, near Winchester, for the honour and glory of God, and the glorious Virgin Mary his Mother, and therein to establish a Custos or Warden, and seventy poor Scholars, Students in Grammar. Infra. 133.

[Valued at 628 l. 13s. 6d. pr Annum.]

PONTFRACT, in Yorkshire.

KIng Richard II. in the eighth year of his Reign, granted his Licence to Robert Knolls Chevalier, and Constance his Wife, to found a Colledge or Chantry, in Pontfract of seven Chaplains, whereof one to be Custos, and for thirteen poor People, two Clerks, and one or two Servants to attend the poor.

[Valued at 182 l. 14s. 7d. per Annum.]

BUNBURY, in Cheshire.

King Richard II. in the tenth year of his Reign, granted his Licence to Hugh de Calveley Chivalier to found a Chantrey or Colledge of one Master and six other Chaplains in the Church of Bunbury, with Liberty to the said Hugh to endow the same, and the said Mr. and Canons to have a Common-Seal.

IRTLYNGBURGH, in Northamptonshire.

KIng Edward III. granted Licence to the Abbot and Convent of Peterburgh, and John Pyel, to erect a Colledge of six Canons secular, of which one to be Dean, and four Clerks, in the Parish Church of St. Peter of Irtlyngburgh, the Right of Presenting to the said Canons places to be in the Abbot and Convent of Peterborough, and the said John, by Turns; But the said John dying before this Foundation was perfected, King Richard II. in the eleventh year of his Reign, for twenty marks paid by Joan his widow and Executrix, granted his Licence to compleat the same.

[Valued at 64 l. 12s. 10d. ob. per Annum.] CLOVELEY, in Devonshire.

KIng Richard II. in the eleventh year of his Reign, Licenced William Cary to convert the Parish Church of Cloveley, the Advowson whereof did belong to the said William, into a Collegiate Church, for

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 317

seven Chaplains, of which one to be Custos or Warden, to found a Colledge and Buildings for their Habitation, in the Rectory, and to appropriate the said Advowson to them.

RUSHWORTH, in Norfolk.

KING Richard the II. in the thirteenth year of his Reign granted his License to several Persons to confer the Mannor of Rushworth, etc., on the Master or Custos of the Colledge of St. John the Evangelist of Rushworth and the Brethren of the same. Anno 1360. Thomas Bishop of Norwich made several Statutes and Ordinances for the Government of this Colledge, late founded by the Lord Edmund de Gonevill, viz., That there be in the said Colledge, five Chaplains of which one to be Master or Custos, that as the Revenues increase the number be increased, and every new Fellow to have at least ten Marks, that they all sleep in one House and eat together, that the Master have the Cure of the Parishoners of the Town of Rushworth with direction for their saying of their Masses and Offices, and that they be all continually resident, etc.

[Valued at 85 l. 15s. ob. per Annum.]

The Collegiate Church of St. David's, in Pembrokeshire.

John Duke of Lancaster, and the Lady Blanch his Wife, and Adam Bishop of St. David's considering that Priests were procured out of England with great difficulty and charges to officiate in the ancient Metropolitan Church of St. David's, they therefore Founded a Chappel or Chantry of one Master and seven Priests, in the manner of a Colledge, on the North-side of the said Cathedral Church, and built there divers Buildings and a Cloyster for their Habitation, and endow'd the same with the Appropriating to it divers Churches, Anno Dom. 1365. Which Bishop made divers Statutes and Orders for Government of the same, viz., that the said Master and Priests should live together in a Collegiate way; that they should perform the Divine Offices in their Chappel according to the Salisbury use, etc. That the said Master and Chaplains shall assist on all Sundays and double Feasts, at High-mass and Vespers, in the Cathedral Church among the Vicars there; that neither the Master nor any of the Priests of the said Chantry go abroad alone, but with a Companion; That the Master receive yearly twenty Marks, and each Chaplain ten Marks; That the said Priests be daily apparrell'd in long Garments [vel Gownis, non Cotis curtis) unless they ride, or go abroad; that the said Master and every Priest may hold another Benefice with cure within the Diocess of St. David's, but is not bound to reside there; That there be always two Choristers remaining in the House under the care of the Praecentor, who is to instruct them in Grammar learning, and singing, etc. Which Orders bear date, Anno Dom. 1382.

[Valued at 106 l. 5s. 6d. per Annum.]

318 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

BRADGARE, in the Diocess of Canterbury.

KING Richard the II. in the sixteenth year of his Reign, granted his License to Robert de Bradgare Clerk, and others, to found a Colledge of one Chaplain, and two Clerks Schollers, to celebrate in the Parish-Church of Bradgare, and to endow the said Colledge with three Messuages, two hundred Acres of Land, one hundred and fifty Acres of Pasture, sixty Acres of Wood, thirteen shillings and four pence of Rent and the Rent of eight Hens, and half a pound of Pepper. Anno Dom. 1398. the said Robert made divers Orders for the Government of this Colledge, viz., that the said Chaplain and his Successors shall continually reside in the Colledge except only the space of one month, containing thirty two days; that the said Chaplain and his Successors shall maintain at their own Charge one Servant to serve them daily at Mass, and in other Offices; that the Chaplain shall not procure to himself any other Benefice or Office whereby his personal Residence here may be hinder'd; that the Chaplain and Clerks be Natives of the Diocess of Canterbury, and of the Consanguinity or affinity of the said Robert; that no Chaplain be admitted unless he can read, construe, and sing well, nor any Clerk unless he can read well, and sing indifferently; that the two Clerks Schollers remain Fellows of the Colledge till their Age of twenty five years and no longer; that the said Chaplain and Schollers and their Successors shall have a Common Lawyer in constant Fee, one of the Council of the Archbishop of Canterbury for the time being, to whom they shall pay 6s. 8d. per Annum, etc.

PLECY, in Essex.

KING Richard the II. in the seventeenth year of his Reign granted his License to his dear Uncle Thomas Duke of Glocester to found and establish in the Parish Church of Plecy a Colledge of nine Chaplains one of which to be Master and Custos, and of two Clerks, and two Choristers, non obstante, etc. And to endow the same with divers Lands, etc.

[Valued at 139 l. 3s. 10d. per Annum.]

MAYDENSTONE, in Kent

KING Richard the II. in the nineteenth year of his Reign granted his License to William de Courtney Archbishop of Canterbury and Legate, his dear Kinsman, to convert the Parish-Church of the blessed Mary of Maidenstone into a Colledge of one Master or Custos, and as many Fellows, Chaplains, and other Ministers as he should think expedient, and to endow the same with Lands and Churches, in particular with the Hospital of St. Peter and St. Paul of Maidenstone, with all the Lands thereunto belonging, etc.

[Valued at 159 l. 7s. 10d. per Annum.]

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 319

KING Richard the II. in the nineteenth year of his Reign granted further to William de Wykeham Bishop of Winchester, whereas by his license he had founded a Colledge of one Custos, and seventy Schollars learning Grammar, commonly call'd Saynt Mary Collegge of Wynchestre, and endowed the same with Possessions for the Maintenance of the said Custos and Schollars, and ten perpetual Chaplains, three other Chaplains, and three Clerks, he now also freed and acquitted the said Colledge and all their Tenents for ever, from all Toll, Geld, Scutage, etc., and from all Taxes and Exactions whatsoever, and that the said Colledge shall never be obliged to grant any Pensions, Corrodies, or any maintenance to any one, at the demand or command of the King or his Heirs. And King Edward the IV. in the first year of his Reign, ratified and confirmed to this Colledge the alien Priory of Andever in the County of Southampton, and all Lands, etc., to the same belonging, to hold in free, pure, and perpetual Alms, notwithstanding the statute of Mortmain, or that the said Priory was of the Foundation of the Kings Progenitors, or that the Lands were given by them for the support of Chantries, Hospitality, or other works of Piety, there, or that express mention is not made of the true value of the same in this present grant, or any other Statute, Act, Law, or Restriction to the contrary whatsoever.

BOLTON, in Yorkshire.

KING Richard the II. in the twentieth year of his Reign, granted his License to Richard le Scrope Chivalier, to found a Chantry of six Chaplains, of which one to be Custos, in his Castle of Bolton, and to endow the same with a yearly Rent of 45 l. 6s. 8d. Also to give to the Abbot and Convent of St. Agatha in Yorkshire, the yearly Rent of 106 l. 13s. 4d. for the support of six Chanuns-Chaplains to celebrate for him in the said Abby, and for the finding and maintenance of two and twenty poor men in the said Abby forever to pray for him, etc.

WENSLAW, in Yorkshire.

KING Richard the II. in the twenty second year of his Reign licensed the before-mentioned Richard le Scrope de Bolton, to erect the Parish Church of the Holy Trinity at Wenslaw, being of his Patronage, into a Colledge, to consist of one Master or Custos, and as many Fellow- Chaplains and other Ministers as he should think fit, and to endow the same with Lands and Revenues to the value of 150 l. which yearly Sum he had formerly granted to the Abbot and Convent of St. Agatha in Yorkshire, for the finding of ten Canons above their own number, and two Secular Chaplains, with two and twenty poor men, but they had released his Grant.

320 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

St. MARY's at Leicester.

KING Henry IV. in the first year of his Reign, reciting, that Henry Duke of Lancaster his Grandfather, had begun the Foundation of a Collegiate-Church at Leicester; in honour of the Annunciation of the blessed Mary, and certain Buildings for the Habitation of Canons, and Clerks and infirm People there dwelling, and that John Duke of Lancaster, his Father, did desire to compleat the same, he approving their pious Intentions, assigned John de Byngham, and others, to provide Masons, Carpenters, and other Workmen to the number of four and twenty, and to provide Timber and Stone for carrying on and finishing the Work, commanding all Mayors, Bayliffs, etc., to be aiding and assisting. Infra p. 140.

IN the eighteenth year of King Henry the VI. Henry Cardinal of England Bishop of Winchester, Henry Archbishop of Canterbury, and Sir Walter Hungerford Knt. Feoffees of Henry late King of England of certain Lands in the Dutchy of Lancaster, granted and settled upon the Dean and Canons of the Collegiate Church of the blessed Mary at Leicester, a Rent Charge of one hundred Marks per Annum arising out of divers Towns in Darbyshire, and payable at Michaelmas and Easter.

[Valued at 595 l. 7s. 4d. per Annum.]

LEDBURY, in Herefordshire.

KING Henry the IV. in the second year of his Reign, licensed John Bishop of Hereford to found a Colledge in the Parish Church Ledbury for nine Chaplains, of which one to be Master or Custos, and they to have a Common Seal, be capable of purchasing and receiving Lands, of suing and being sued, etc.

NORTH-YEVEL, in Bedfordshire.

KIng Henry IV. in the sixth year of his Reign, granted his License to Gerard Braybrok Chivalier, and others to purchase of John Wateryng Clerk, and others, the Advowson of the Parish Church of North-Yevell, and to erect and change the same into a Colledge to consist of one Master or Custos, and as many Fellow-Chaplains, and other Ministers, as they shall think expedient and to endow the same by appropriating thereunto the said Church of North-Yevel, and that the said Master and Chaplains, may out of the said Appropriation grant a pension of five marks yearly, to a Chaplain celebrating for the Dead in the Chappel of the Mannour of Ouye in the County of Cambridge.

[Valued at 61 l. 5s. 8d. ob. per Annum.]

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 321

ATTILBURGH, in Norfolk.

KIng Henry IV. in the 7th. year of his Reign, for 100. Marks granted his Licence to Henry Packenham Senior, and Simon Parson of the Church of Scultone to found a Chantry in the Parish Church of Attilburgh in honour of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, to consist of five Chaplains, one of which to be Custos or Master; and to endow the same, among other things, with the Church of great Elyngham to be appropriated to the said Colledg, provided that a Vicar of the said Church be sufficiently endow'd and a competent Sum of mony be appointed by the Ordinary of the Place to be distributed to the Poor of the said Parish, according to the Statute, 15. R. 2. c. 6.

[Valued at 21 l. 16s. 3d. per Annum.]

STAYNEDROPE, in the County Palatin of Durham.

THomas Bishop of Durham, in the third year of his Pontificate, granted his Licence to Ralf de Nevill Earl of Westmerland, to found a Colledge of one Master or Custos, and certain other Chaplains continually to reside, and for certain poor Gentlemen, and other poor People in the Town of Staynedrope in his Liberty of Durham; and to endow the same with the Advowson of the Church of Staynedrope, which was held of him in Capite; with Licence to the said Master or Custos, and Chaplains to receive the same, the Statute of Mortmain non obstante, and by the same Grant incorporated the said Colledge, making the said Master and Chaplains, etc., capable of purchasing and receiving Lands, to sue and be sued, and Granted them a Common-Seal. Dated at Durham in the third year of his Pontificate.

[Valued at 126 l. 5s. 10d. per Annum.]

TONGE, in Shropshire.

KIng Henry IV. in the twelfth year of his Reign, for the Sum of 40 l. paid into the Hanaper, granted his Licence to Isabel Widow of Fulk de Penbrugge Chivaler, and others, to purchase of the Abbot and Convent of the Abby of Salop, the Advowson of the Church of St. Bartholomew at Tonge, and to erect and change the same into a Colledge of five Chaplains, of which one to be Custos, and to endow the same with Lands and Churches, for the Maintenance of the said Custos and Chaplains, and thirteen poor People, more or less, whom he incorporated, etc. Settling the Patronage of the said Colledge on Richard de Penbrugge in special tail, with divers remainders over. King Henry V. in the third year of his Reign, setting forth that by an Act made in the Parliament late held at Leicester, all the alien Priories were given to him and his Heirs, granted to the Custos and Chaplains of this Colledge the Priory of Lapeley, and all the Revenues thereunto appurtaining, being heretofore part of the Possessions of the Abby of St. Remigius at Reymys in Champeyne, Provided that the Vicarage of the Church of Lappeley be sufficiently endow'd, and a competent Sum allow'd to the Poor of the Parish, according to the Statute. The foresaid Isabel and others who were Founders of this Colledge, made divers orders for Government of the same, among others, that none of the Chaplains be capable of holding any other Ecclesiastical Benefice, except only the Custos, who may; that there be two

322 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

Clerks, of the first Tonsure, to assist in the Divine Offices; that there be thirteen poor People; that the Master or Custos be chosen out of the number of the Chaplains, by the rest; if they do not choose in fifteen days, then he is to be appointed, for that turn, by the Patron, if he neglects for four Months, then by the Bishop of the Diocess, and if he neglects for one Month, then by the Chapter of Litchfield, if they neglect for fifteen days, then by the Archbishop of Canterbury; The Custos on his admission to be sworn to a faithful Administration of his Office, and to observe the Statutes, every Chaplain to be sworn to be obedient to the Custos, etc. That the Custos be Confessor to the other Chaplains and that every of them be obliged to confess to him at least once a year; That the Sub-Custos govern in the absence of the Custos, and take care of the Affairs of the Chappel; that the Custos shall not be Non-resident above two months in a year, nor any Chaplain above one; that the Custos shall appoint one of the Chaplains to have the Cure of the Parish, who shall be call'd the Parochial Chaplain, and another of the Chaplains to teach the Clerks aud Ministers of the Colledge, and also the poor Children of the Town, and other Neighbouring Towns, in Reading, Singing, and Grammar, for which he shall receive half a Mark per Annum; That Mattines shall begin soon after day, and that it be celebrated according to the Salisbury use, with directions for the several Masses; that after Vespers and Complin they shall say the Antiphon Salve Regina, or some other Antiphon of the blessed Mary, according to the time; That every Brother shall forbear as much as he can to bring in any Stranger, but rarely or never any Woman, etc., that no Priest or Clerk shall use Hunting, or Hawking, or keeping a hunting Dog in the Colledge; That the Masters Sallary shall be ten Marks per Annum, Every Chaplains four Marks per Annum, The Parochial Chaplain, and the Steward to have half a mark each more than their Sallary yearly, and each of the poor Men one Mark per Annum, besides their Habitation; That the Colledge shall have a Seal, with this Circumscription Sigillum commune S. Bartholomaei Apostoli de Tonge, which Seal to be kept in a Chest under two different Locks, and in the same Chest the Charters, Indentures, and Muniments of the Colledge; that the Custos and Priests shall not grant any Corrodies or Pensions; That if any of the Brethren become guilty of such a Crime as renders him irregular as homicide, etc., he shall no longer administer in his order, but shall be expell'd; if it be such a Crime, as after penance he may continue to minister in his Order, as Adultery, false Witness, Sacriledge, Theft, etc. he may after penance, be tollerated in his Office and Order, making Oath that for the future he will never be guilty of the like Crime again; if he be guilty of a lesser Crime, as simple Fornication, Disobedience, Drunkenness or the like, being twice admonisht by the Custos, upon the third offence he shall be expell'd the House as incorrigible, etc. Which Statutes and Orders bear date Anno Dom. 1410. (12. H. 4.) And were confirm'd by John Bishop of Coventry and Litchfield, Anno Dom. 1411.

[Valued at 22 l. 8s. 1d. per Annum.]

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 323

FODRINGHEY, in Northamptonshire.

KING Henry the IV. in the thirteenth year of his Reign, together with Edward Duke of York, founded a Colledge of one Master, twelve Chaplains, eight Clerks, and thirteen Choristers, upon six Acres of Land in the Lordship of the said Edward Duke of York at Fodringhey, and the said King incorporated them by the name of the Master and Colledge of the blessed Mary and All Saints of Fodringhey, etc., and granted to them the Profits of the Alien Priories of Newent, and Anebury, during his Wars with France, etc. And exempted and discharged this Colledge from all Tolls and Taxes of what nature soever, as well for their Goods as Lands, given by the said King or any other Benefactors, and granted them Frankpledge, Felons Goods, etc., with abundance of Royal Liberties and Franchises. King Henry the V. in the third year of his Reign, granted to his beloved Cousin Edward Duke of York liberty to enfeoff Henry Bishop of Winchester, Thomas Bishop of Durham, Sir Walter Hungerford, Knt. Roger Flore of Okham, and others, with his Castle, Mannor, and Town of Fodringhay, and several other Mannors and Lordships which he held of that King in Capite, for the carrying on and compleating the Buildings and Charges of this Colledge. William Horwod of Fodringhay Indented with William Wolston Esquire, and Thomas Peckham Clerk, Commissioners for the Duke of York, to make up a new Body of the Church joyning to the Quire of the Colledge of Fodringhey, of the same heighth and breadth with the said Quire, to be fourscore foot in lengthy etc. A Porch on the South side twelve foot, in length, another Porch on the South-side adjoyning to the Cloyster, and in the West-end of the said Body a Steeple fourscore foot in higth from the Ground-Table-Stone, twenty foot square within the Walls, and the Walls six foot thick, the Duke to find Carriage and Stuff, for which well and duly to be made, the said Horwode to have 300 l. Sterling; which Indenture bears date 13. H. 6.

[Valued at 19 l. 11s. 10d. ob. per Annum.]

STOKE-CLARE, in Suffolk.

THIS being formerly a Priory of Benedictines, was by Edmund Earl of March, by whose Ancestors it was founded, changed into a Collegiate Church of a Dean and Secular Canons, which change was ratified by the Papal Authority of John the XXIII. and Martin V.

Thomas Barneslay Dean of the Collegiate Church of Stoke juxta Clare, by the Authority and Command of Edmund Mortimer Earl of March and Ulster, and Lord of Wigmore and Clare, first Founder and Patron of the said Colledge, made several Statutes and Ordinances for Government of the same, viz. That there be always one Dean and six Secular Canons, that every Canon reside full two and thirty weeks in the year, or other wise he shall receive but 40s. for his Prebend that year in which he has not so resided; that neither the Dean nor any Canon lie in Bed in the Morning longer than six a Clock, or half an hour past; that there be in the said Colledge eight Vicars sworn to continual Residence, and two greater Clerks, also five Chorists or honest Boys to sing and serve in the

324 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

Quire; that the Chorists have five Marks per Annum each; that there be two inferiour Clerks who are to take care of the Vestry, and ringing the Bells, that they ring to Mattins at five and go at six to high Mass at eleven, and that they ring to Vespers so that they may be ended about five in the Afternoon; That no Canon who cannot spend 40 l. per Annum, and no Vicar nor Clerk shall use hunting, nor any of them keep any Hounds in the Colledge, except the Dean, who may keep four; that no Canon or Clerk shall wear any Arms in the said Colledge, under the penalty of forfeiting the said Arms for the first offence, and of twenty shillings for the second; that none of the Canons, Vicars, or Clerks shall be married, or suspected of having any scandalous communication with Women; That if any one be convicted of Heresie, or Sodomy, or Magick he shall be expell'd; that no Canon, Vicar, or Clerk, shall go abroad alone, but with a Companion; That they shall all duly and honestly pay their Debts to their Creditors; That there be a Porter of the said Colledge who shall shut the Gate at Coverfeu time, and admit none after that time; That one of the Vicars be appointed by the Dean to be Precentor, for the Government of the Quire in singing, and Ceremonies, etc., who is to receive on that account 20s. per Annum, That the Colledge have a Common Seal, to be kept with their Evidences and Jewells, in a common Chest under three different Keys, one of which to be kept by the Dean, the other two by the two Senior Canons; That there be no precedency among the Vicars at the Table, but that they ait as they come, but in the Choire according to Seniority; That all the Vicars eat together in the Common Hall, and that at Meal time some part of the Bible be always read to them; That every Vicar have liberty eight weeks in the year, and every Clerk six, to visit their friends and recreate themselves; that nothing shall be sealed with the Common Seal unless it be first Registred in a Book to be kept for that purpose; That every Dean within a year after his instalment give to the Colledge one Cope of the value of 5 l. and make a Feast for the Canons, etc., or pay for it 40s. That upon vacancy of the Deanery, the Patron of the Colledge present to the Bishop, a Graduate in some University, at least Master in Arts, or Batchelour in Law, to be instituted Dean; which Statutes and Orders bear date in the year l422.

[Valued at 324 l. 4s. 1d. ob. per Annum.]

NORTH-CADBURY, in Somersetshire.

KING Henry the V. in the fourth year of his Reign, granted his License to Elizabeth Widow of William Botreaux the elder, Chivalier, to found this Colledge for seven Chaplains of which one to the chief, to have the Cure of Souls there, and to be call'd Rector of the Colledge of St. Michael of North-Cadbury, and for four Clerks, with Licence to the said Elizabeth, and William Botreaux the yonger, to appropriate the Church of North-Cadbury thereunto, and endow the same with divers Lands, etc.

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 325

MANCHESTER, in Lancashire.

King Henry V. in the ninth year of his Reign, granted his Licence in consideration of two hundred marks paid in the Hanaper to Thomas Bishop of Durham, and other Feoffees of Thomas la Warre Clerk, to erect the Church of Manchester into a Collegiate Church, and to establish therein a Master or Custos with as many fellow Chaplains, and other Ministers, as they should think fit, whom he incorporated, etc.

HIGHAM-FERRERS, in Northamptonshire.

IN the 10 Henry V. that King granted his Licence to Henry Chichley Archbishop of Canterbury to found a Colledge at Higham-Ferrers, the Place of his Nativity, for eight Chaplains of which one to be Master, and four Clerks, one of which Chaplains or Clerks to teach Grammar, and another Song, and for six Choristers, whom the said King incorporated by the Name of the Master and Colledge of the Blessed Virgn Mary, St. Thomas of Canterbury, and St. Edward the Confessor, of Higham-Ferrers, and granted Licence to endow the same with Lands, etc.

[Valued at 156 l. 2s. 7d. per Annum.]

St. MICHAEL Pater noster Chirche, or Whitington Colledge, in London.

HEnry Archbishop of Canterbury, in the year 1424. granted his Licence, to John Coventre, John Carpenter, and William Grove, Executors of Richard Whitington late Citizen and Mercer, and several times Mayor of London, to erect a Colledge, pursuant to the Will of the said Richard in the Parish Church of St. Michael call'd Pater noster Chirche in the Riol, in London, for five or six Chaplains and other Clerks and Ministers, and an Almes-House of thirteen poor People, and to make orders for the Government of the same. And accordingly the said Executors did found such a Colledge in honour of the Holy Ghost, the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Michael, and All Saints, and made divers Orders touching the said Foundation, as that there shall be five Chaplains not elswhere beneficed, one of which to be Master, two Clerks besides the Parish Clerk, and four Choristers, appointing the first Chaplains to be William Brooke, John Whyte, Nicholas Gaytone, Richard Olyne, and Gregory King; and that William Brooke, at that time Rector of the said Church of St. Michael, be the Master of the Colledge, that on all Sundays, when Sermons are Preacht at St. Paul's Cathedral, the Masses in this Church be finisht in such time, that the Parishoners of this Parish, and Mr. and Chaplains of the Colledge, may go to Paul's and be present at the Sermon, unless there be a Sermon in this Church also on the same day; That in the Canon of their Masses special mention be made of the Souls of the said Richard Whityngton, and Alice his Wife, and of Sr. William Whityngton Knt, and the Lady Joan his Wife Parents of the said Richard, etc. That two Solemn Obits be yearly celebrated for the said Richard and Alice, one on the three and twentieth or four and twentieth of March, the other on the thirtieth or one and

326 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

thirtieth of July, and that then the Master receive 20d. every Chaplain 12d. every Clerk 6d. and every Chorister 3d. That the said Master Chaplains, Clerks, and Choristers, inhabit altogether in a Messuage built for that purpose at the East end of the said Church of St. Michael's; That the Master receive yearly, over and above the Profits of the Parish as Rector, the Sum of ten marks, every Chaplain eleven marks, the first Clerk eight marks, the second 100s. and every Chorister five marks, beside their habitations; that they keep Commons together in the Hall of the Colledge, and that there be always at their Meal time, something read out of the Holy Scriptures, Sermons or Homilies of the Saints, etc. That there be a Common Chest for keeping the Seal and Evidences, etc. under three different Keys, one to be kept by the Master, the other two by two other of the Chaplains, and that no one presume to keep all three, or any two of the said Keys, and that all overplus Revenue and Income, more then defrays the usual charges of the Colledge, be laid up and carefully preserved in the said Chest, for the Common Benefit of the House; That the Master be not absent or non resident above sixty days in a year nor any of the Chaplains above twenty; That the Master, and Chaplains at the time of of their admission be sworn to observe the Statutes; that the Mayor of London for the time being be Overseer, and the Wardens of the Company of Mercers, Conservators and Patrons of the Colledge, etc. Which Orders bear date the seventeenth and eighteenth of December 1424. (3. Henry VI.) vide inf. p. 189.

[Valued at 20 l. 1s. 8d. per Annum.]

BATTLE-FEILD, in Shropshire.

KIng Henry IV, in the eleventh year of his Reign, granted to Roger Yve Rector of the Chappel of St. John Baptist of Adbrigton Husee two acres of Ground in that Lordship adjoyning to Shrewsbury, in a Place call'd Bateleyfeld, being the Place where he fought with, and overcame, Henry Percy, and the Rebells with him, for the Building thereon a Chappel in honour of St. Mary Magdalen, for the Master and five Chaplains, of which Chappel and five Chaplains he appointed the said Roger, and his Successors Rector of the said Chappel of St. John Baptist, to be Masters or Wardens; and Richard Husee Lord of Adbrigton and his Heirs to be Patrons of the same; incorporating the said Foundation, and freeing them from Tenths, Subsidies, and all Taxes; with the Grant of a Fair to the said Roger and his Successors, to be held there yearly on the Feast of St. Mary Magdalen. Which Roger Yve by his Will dated 30. October Anno 1444. (24. Henry VI.) gave to this Colledge three Chalices Silver and gilt, one Paxbrede, Silver gilt, two Phiols Silver, three Bells in the Steple, three Crosses gilt, with several Vestments and Books for Church Service, and divers household goods, etc., and encreased the Stipends of every of the five Chaplains from eight marks to ten marks per Annum, Conditionally that they pray in a more especial manner for the Souls of King Henry IV. and King Henry V. Founders of this Colledge, Richard Husee first Patron of the same, etc., and for the Souls of all the Faithful slain in the fight of Bataylfeld, and there buried; All the Residue of his goods and Chattels he gave to the Fabrick, and Work, of the said Colledge, and to the releif

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 327

of the Poor in the Hospital of the same. He also appointed a new Seal to be made for the Colledge with this Circumscription, S. Commune Domini Rogeri Ive primi Magistri, & Successorum suorum Collegii beate Mariae Magdalenae juxta Salop.

[Valued at 54 l. 1s. 10d. per Annum.]

THE beforementiond John Coventre, John Carpenter, and William Grove, Executors of Richard Whytingham, by their Deed dated 15 Feb. 3. Henry VI. granted a yearly Rent of 63 l. sterling, to the Colledge by them Founded as before mention'd, and alter'd and added some few things to the Statutes and Orders relating to the said Colledge.

THELE, in Hertfordshire.

KIng Henry VI. in the ninth year of his Reign, at the request of William Bishop of London, Patron and Ordinary of this Colledge, which had been founded and endow'd for the maintenance of one Custos and four Chaplains, who by ill management had lost, and wasted most of their Estate, granted his Licence to John Howeden Clerk then Custos of this Colledge to transfer divers Lands and Impropriations in Essex and Hertfordshire yet remaining, to Henry Hoddesden Prior of the Hospital of Elsing-Spitell in London, and to the Convent there, they finding two Canons Regular to celebrate in this Colledge, and three other Canons Regular to celebrate in the said Hospital, for the Souls of the Founders of this Colledge.

WYE, in the County of Kent.

KIng Henry VI. in the tenth year of his Reign, granted his Licence so John Archbishop of York, who had had the Custody of both the Privy Seal, and great Seal, to found a Colledge at Wye in the Diocess of Canterbury, the place of his Nativity, for one Master or Provost, and such number of Priests or Chaplains, and Ecclesiastical Ministers as he shall see fit, to be call'd the Colledge of St. George and St. Martin, whom he incorporated, and granted to the said Archbishop Power to endow the same with Lands, and appropriate Churches, and to appropriate the Vicarage of the Parish Church of Wye thereunto, any Law or Statute to the contrary non obstante. The said King also granted to this Bishop divers Lands, etc., formerly belonging to Katherine late Abbess of Guynes in the County of Artoys valued at 14 l. per Annum, to be conferr'd on this Colledge, with divers other Revenues.

[Valued at 93 l. 2s. ob. per Annum.]

328 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

TATESHALE, in Lincolnshire.

KING Henry the VI. in the seventeenth year of his Reign, licenced Ralph Cromwell, Knt. and others to convert the Parish Church of Tateshale, into a Collegiate Church, or Colledge of seven Chaplains (of which one to be Master or Custos) six Clerks, and six Choristers, and to erect an Alms house thereunto adjoyning for thirteen poor People of both Sexes, and incorporated the same by the name of the Master or Custos, and Chaplains of the Colledge and Almshouse of the Holy Trinity of Tateshale, with licence to the said Colledge, etc., to purchase, receive, and hold Lands, etc., to the value of 200 l. per Annum over and beside the Profits of the Advowson and yearly value of the Church of Tateshale, etc.

[Valued at 348 l. 5s. 11d. ob. q. per Annum.]

ETON by Windsor, in Barkshire.

FOunded by King Henry the VI. in the nineteenth year of his Reign; for the carrying on of which work he appointed Robert Kent, William Lynde, and William Waryn, to be his Procurators and Agents. It did, in the first Institution, consist of one Provost, or Praeposit, ten Priests, four Clerks, and six Boys Choristers, five and twenty poor and indigent Grammar Schollars, and five and twenty poor and decrepid men, also one Master to teach Grammar learning to the foresaid poor Schollars and others coming from any parts of England, freely and without any manner of exaction; of this Foundation he made Henry Sever Clerk, the first Provost, and incorporated them by the name of the Provost and Royal Colledge of the Blessed Mary of Eton near Wydesor, he also gave them the Advowson of the Parish-Church of Eton, to be made Collegiate, and intirely united to their own proper use, without endowing a Vicar, or appointing a competent Sum to be yearly distributed to the Poor of the Parish out of the same, the Statute non obstante, with License to purchase Lands to the value of one thousand Marks per Annum, the Statute of Mortmain non obstante, and discharged them from the Payment of Corrodies, or any Pensions, or Annuities whatsoever. The said King granted to this Colledge divers Rents rising out of several Alien Priories, with the Reversions of the said Estates, and all Liberties and Franchises to those Alien Priories belonging, in as full and ample manner as they were ever used by the former Possessors, with warranty, etc.

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 329

NEWPORT, in Shropshire.

KING Henry the VI. in the twentieth year of his Reign Licensed Thomas Draper to purchase and receive from the Abbot and Convent of St. Peter's at Shrewsbury, the Parish Church of Newport, and therein to found and erect a Colledge of one Custos, a Priest, and four Chaplains, whom by the name of the Custos and Chaplains of Seint Marie-College of Newport, he incorporated, with License to endow the same with Lands, etc., of the value of 10 l. per Annum and appropriated the said Parish Church to the same, provided that the Custos for the time being takes the cure of Souls, and ministers all and singular the Sacraments to the Parishoners, etc.

St. MARY's at Stafford.

KIng Henry the VI. in the four and twentieth year of his Reign, granted the Patronage and Advowson of the Deanery of his free Chappel at Stafford, to Humphrey Duke of Buckingham; and Licensed him to give one hundred marks of Land, etc., to the Dean and Canons of the said free Chappel.

[Valued at 35 l. 15s. 10d. per Annum.]

WESTBURY, in Gloucestershire.

KIng Edward the IV. in the fourth year of his Reign, gave to Henry Sampson Clerk, Dean of this Colledge, and the Chapter of the same and their Successors, the Mannor of Aylmynstere, to hold in pure and perpetual Alms, with view of Frankpledge, etc.

[Valued at 232 l. 14s. per Annum.]

BARNARD-CASTELL, in the County Palatine of Durham.

KIng Edward the IV. in the seventeenth year of his Reign, granted his License to his most dear Brother Richard Duke of Gloucester to erect a Colledge at Barnard-Castle, in the Castle there, of one Dean, and twelve Chaplains, ten Clerks, six Chorists, and one other Clerk, whom he incorporated by the name of the Dean and Chaplains of the Colledge of Richard Duke of Gloucester of Barnard Castell, and that the said Dean and Chaplains may purchase Lands, etc., to the yearly value of four hundred marks, over and above all reprises.

330 Collegiate Churches. VOL. III.

MIDDELHAM, in Yorkshire.

IN the same year, the said King Edward the IV. licensed his said Brother Richard Duke of Gloucester to erect another Colledge at Middelham of a Dean, six Chaplains, four Clerks, six Choristers, and one other Clerk, to celebrate Divine Service in the Parish Church there, whom he incorporated by the name of the Dean and Chaplains of the Colledge of Richard Duke of Gloucester of Middelham in in the County of York, and that they may purchase Lands, etc., to the value of two hundred Marks per Annum over and above all Reprises, etc.

ROTHERAM, in Yorkshire.

KIng Edward the IV. in the twentieth year of his Reign granted his License to Thomas Rotheram Bishop of Lincoln to erect a Chantry of one Chaplain to celebrate daily at the Altar newly built by the said Bishop within the Parish Church of Rotheram, in honour of our Lord Jhesu Christ. Two years after that the same King Licensed the said Thomas then Archbishop of York, to found a Colledge in Rotheram to consist of one Provost, a Preacher of the Word of God, and of two Fellows, one of which to be a Teacher of Grammar, and the other a Teacher of Song, with such other Fellows as the Revenues shall admit of, for the Preaching of the word of God in the Parish of Rotheram, and elsewhere in the Diocess of York, and for the free teaching of Grammar, and Song, to any Schollers who are desirous, to learn, and come to the said Colledge from any parts of England; and incorporated the same by the name of the Provost and Fellows of the Colledge of Jesus at Rotheram, with License to the said Thomas to give the Soil whereon the said Colledge shall be built to the same, and other Lands and Possessions, etc., to the value of one hundred Marks per Annum, and to appropriate the Church of Laxton in the County of Nottingham, thereunto.

[Valued at 58 l. 5s. 9d. ob. per Annum.]

The Kings free Chappels have been of old time, and ought to he exempt from the ordinary Jurisdiction, and all Payment of Procurations or any other impositions or exactions whatsoever.

VOL. III. Collegiate Churches. 331

POpe Paul the IV. confirm'd to Sir William Peter, Knt. and a Councellor of State, divers Mannors and Lands, etc., formerly belonging to several Monasteries, and by him purchased and obtain'd from King Henry the VIII. and others, and absolved him from all Excommunications, and other Ecclesiastical Censures or Penalties that he might incur for holding the same, and decreed that he might for the future without any scruple of Conscience continue the Possession of the same with command to the Bishop of London, etc., not to permit him to be vext or disturb'd in relation to his foresaid Lands, etc., under pain of the severest Censures of the Church. Whose Bull bears date at St. Peter's in Rome, Anno Dom. 1555. (23. Ph. & Ma.)

FINIS.

A CATALOGUE OF The Religious Houses, etc., as they were Scituated within the several Counties in England.

BARKSHIRE.

Abington, Walingford, Hellenstow, Hurley, Reading, Sandford, Poghele, Bisham, Donyngton, Wyndsor, Eaton.

BEDFORDSHIRE.

Beauleiu, Mergate, Wardon, Woburn, Dunstable, Bissemede, Harewold, Newenham, Caldewell Todington, Chikesand, North-Tevel.

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE.

Ankerwik, Snelleshall, Ivingho, Burnham, Missenden, Tikeford, Bittlesden, Mendham, Nutley, Chetwode, Asherug, Alesbury, Lavingdene, Newinton-Longville.

CAMBRIDGESHIRE.

Ely, Thorney, Chateriz, Romburgh, St. Radegunds, Denny, Waterbecham, Swanesey, Barnewell, Angleseye, Royston, Spiney.

CHESHIRE.

St. Werburghs, Birkened, Chester Nunery, Cumbermere, Deulacres, Stanlaw, Dernhall, Norton, Modberley, Bunbury.

CORNWALL.

St. Petrocus, St. Germains, Sylley Isle, St. Michaels Mount, Tywardreit, Bodmin, Launceston, Glasenaye.

CUMBERLAND.

Armethwayt, St. Bees, Wetherhall, Seaton, Calder, Holmcultrum, Carlile, Lanercoft.

DARBYSHIRE.

Darby, Derley, Repindon, Beaucheif, Dale, St. Mary de Pratis, Calc.

DEVONSHIRE.

Tavestock, Exeter, St. Micholas at Exeter, St. Catherines Exeter, Modbury, Ottery, Stoke Curcy, St. James, Barnestaple, Ford, Buckfast, Dunkewell, Newenham, Bocland, Totnes, Barnstaple, Plimton, Hartland, Frithelstoke, Torre, Cloveley.

DORSETSHIRE.

Sherburn, Winburne, Midleton, Shaftesbury, Horton, Cerne, Abbotsbury, Shirburn, Lodres, Frampton, Tarent, Binedon.

DURHAM.

Durham, Wyrmouth, Finchale, Egleton, Shireburne, Gretham, Oveton, Kypier, Langecestre, Aukland, Chester, Staynedrope, Barnard Castle.

ESSEX.

Berking, Colne, Walden, Mersey, Horselegh, Prittlewell, Stannesgate, Cogeshall, Stratford-Langton, Tiltey, Heningham, Thremhale, Colchester, Waltham, Dunmow, St. Osiths, Wykes, Wodham, Illesford, Hornechirche, Havering, Bocking, Maldone, Snapes, Plecy.

GLOUCESTERSHIRE.

Gloucester, Tukesbury, Winchcumb, Derehurst, Kingswood, Flexley, Hayles, St. Oswalds, Ciremester, Bristol, Keinsham, Lechelade, Billeswike, Stanley, Ginges, Westbury.

A Catalogue of the Religious Houses etc.

HANTSHIRE.

Winchester, Hide, Rumsey, Warwell, Winteney, Andever, Apledercomb in the Isle of Wight, Shireburn, Quarre in the Isle of Wight, Beauleiu, Letley, Suthwike, Twineham, Motesfont, Seleburn, Southampton, Basingstoke, St. Crosses, Titchfield, Caresbroke Isle of Wight.

HEREFORDSHIRE.

Hereford, Ewyas, Leominster, Lingebrook, Cresswell, Monkenlen, Clifford, Dore, Wigmore, Wormley, Acornbury, Flanesford, Ledbury.

HERTFORDSHIRE.

St. Albans, Hatfeild, Peverell, Hertford, St. Mary de Prato, Sopewell, Flamsted, Chesthunt, Rowney, St. Julians.

HUNTINGTONSHIRE.

Ramsey, St. Ives, St. Neots, Huntington, Saltre, Stoneley by Kimbolton.

KENT.

Canterbury, Rochester, St. Mildred, Folkstone, Liming, Raculfa, Shepey, Malling, Davinton, Levisham, Patricksburn, Horton, Feversham, Boxley, Dover, Ledes, St. Radegundis, Tonebrigge, Cumbwell, Lesnes, Bilsington, Badlesmere, Dertford, St. Gregories at Canterbury, Romenale, Herbaldown, Strode, Hethe, Langdone, Mottidon, Wengham, Wye, Bradgare, Maydenstone.

LANCASHIRE.

Penwortham, Lythom, Holand, Lancaster, Furnes, Kirtmele, Burscough, Conyngeshed, Cokersand, Manchester.

LEICESTER.

Langley, Hinkley, Geroudon, Grace-dieu, Bredon, Laund, Ouston, de Pratis, Bradley, Kerkby Beler, Burton, Leicester, Stockerson, Croxton, Kerby super, Wrethek.

LINCOLNSHIRE.

Bardeney, Croyland, Spalding, Belvoir, Santoft and Henes, Frestone, Stikeswould, Stanford, Foss, Steinfeild, Covenham, Burwell, Willesford, Minting, Long-Benington, Hagh, Swineshead, Louthpark, Kirksted, Revesby, Valledei, Greenfield, Legburne, Nun-Cotun, Epworth, Hyrst, Thornton, Nocton, Thornholme, Bourn, Kyme, Thorkesey, Grimesby, Ravenston, St. Innocents, Lincoln, Ellesham, Newstede, Holbeche, Newhus, Tupholm, Newbo, Hagneby, Barlings, Sempringham, Haverholme, Bolington, Alvingham, Ormesby Sixill, Maresey, Ancolm, Katteley, St. Catherines, Heynings, Holland-Brig, Wells, Tateshale.

LONDON.

Minoresses, Abby of Grace, Carthusians, Trinity Priory, St. Bartlemew, St. Giles, St. Mary Bethelem, St. Mary Spittle, St. Bartholmews Hospital, St. Thomas of Acon, Rounceval, Converts, St. Katherines, Elsing-Spittle, Berking-Chirch, Savoy, St. Iohns, St. Hellens, Whitingtons Colledge and Hospital, St. Pauls, Crooked-lane.

MIDDLESEX.

Westminster, Kilburn, Clerkenwell, Halywell, Syon, St. James, St. Stevens Chappel at Westminster.

NORFOLK.

Dereham, Wymundham, Binham, Norwich, Horsham, Carhow, Blackebxrgh, Waburn, Wells, Toft, West-Acre, CastleAcre, Mendham, Bromholm, Reinham, Slevesholm, Thetford, Sibeton, Pentney, Walsingham, Cokesford, Buckenham, Hickling, de Prato, Linne, Wendlyng, Langley, Shouldham, Ingham, Rushworth, Attilburgh.

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE.

Peterborough, Peykirk, Wyrthorp, Sewardsley, Luffeild, Weden-Pinkney, Northampton, Daventrey, Pipwell, St. Mary de Pratis, Chaucombe, Canons Ashby, Brackley, Sulby, Catesby, Cotherstoke, Irtlyngburgh, Fodringhey, Higham-Ferrers.

NOTTINGHAMSHIRE.

Wallingwells, Blith, Lenton, Rufford, Beau-valle, Wirksop, Felley, Thurgarton, Newstead, Nottingham, Wellebeck, Brodholm, Shelford, Stoke, Suthwelle, Tuxford.

NORTHUMBERLAND.

Tinemouth, Hallistane, Lambley, Hexam, Brinkeburne, Bolton, New-Castle, Alneweke, Blanland.

OXFORDSHIRE.

Oxford, Eynesham, Stodely, Godstow, Glosterhall, Coges, Tame, Brure, Rewley, Oseney, Dorchester, Cold-Norton, Bisseter, Wroxton, Ewelme, Burcestre,

RUTLAND.

Broke, Okeham.

SHROPSHIRE.

Shrewsbury, Bromfield, Chirbury, Abberbury, Wenlock, Bildwas, Haghmon, Littleshull, Wombrigge, Ratlingcope, St. Giles, Brugenorth, Ludlow, Hales-Owen, Tonge, Battlefield, Newport.

SOMERSETSHIRE.

Glastonbury, Bath, Wells, Atheling, Dunster, Bristol, Clive, Montacute, Witham, Taunton, Haselberge, Briweton, Berliz, Wospring, Stenerdale, Brugwalter, St. Laurence, North Cadbury.

STAFFORSHIRE.

Burton, Tutbury, Canewell, Farwell, Blithbury, Sandwell, Dudley, Croxden, Hilton, Wulverhampton, Lapley, Stone, Ronton, Trentham, Rowcestre, St. Thomas, Wolverhampton, Litchfield, Stafford.

SUFFOLK.

Hulme, St. Edmundsbury, Eye, Sudbury, Radingfield, Edwardston, Campess, Kersey, Stoke Clare, Blackeham, Briset, Ixworth, Butley, Ipswich, Bliburg, Leyston, Begeham, Bruseyard.

SUSSEX.

Selsey, Battel-Abby, Sele, Boxgrave, Levenestre, Lewes, Roberts-bridge, Hastings, Binham, Heryngham, Michelham, Durford, Arundel, Chichester.

SURREY.

Chertsey, Bermundsey, Waverley, Sheen, St. Mary-Overy, Merton, Newsted, Rigate, Tanregge, Southwarke, Sandone.

WARWICKSHIRE.

Polesworth, Coventry, Aucot, Wroxhall, Pinley, Bretford, Alester, Henwood, Nun-eaton, Wotton-waven, Kirkby, Stonely, Mereval, Cumb, Stodely, Kenilworth, Erdbury, Maxstoke, Warwick, Thelesford, Asteleye.

WESTMERLAND.

Heppe.

WILTSHIRE.

Malmsbury, Wilton, Ambresbury, Kington, Okeburn, Farley, Stanleigh, Henton, Brummore, Bradenstroke, Marleburgh, Ivichurch, Merleberge Salisbury, Heitsbury, Pulton, Leycock, Edindon, Maiden-Bradley.

WORCESTERSHIRE.

Worcester, Evesham, Pershore, Malverne, Westwood, Bordesley, Dodford.

YORKSHIRE.

Lestingham, Whitby, Beverley, Rippon, Selby York, St. Marys, St. Martins at Richmond, Midlesburg, Hakenes, Grendale, Nunkelling, Monkton, Marrigg, Kirkley, Little-Marais, Nunburnham, Arden, Rossedale, St. Clements, Wilberfoss, Tykehead, Holy Trinity, York, Hedlay, Birstall, Gromond, Alverton, Pontefract, Monk-Breton, Arthington, Rieval, Fountains, Biland, Meaux, New-Minster, Sinningthwait, Esseholt, Hampole, Swine, Rupe, Hoton, Basedale, Salley, Kirkstall, Ierval, Nun-Apleton, Keldeholm, Wickham, Kingston, Mountgrace, Swine, Byland, Nostell, Woodkirk, Scekirk, Drax, Marton, Bolton, Kirkham, Gisburne, Scarthe, Bridlington, Wartre, Newburgh, Hode, Helaghe, Haltemprise, St. Leonards York, Carmans Spittle, Yarum, Scardeburgh, Kynewaldgraves, Hedon, Sutton, Glanfordbrigge, St. Nicholas, Richmond, Coverham, St. Agatha near Richmund, Watton, St. Andrews York, Malton, Ellerton, Knaresborough, Newton, Sivethorpe, Hemmyngburgh, Wenslaw, Middelham, Rotherham, Fossgate in York.

In WALES.

Brecknock, Cadwelli, Tallach, Margan, Abergavenny, Lankywan, Goldclive, Monmouth, Nethe, Basingwerk, Tintern, Cumhire, Blancland, Clunoc-vaur, Stratflure, Stratmargell or Strata-Marcella, Aberconway, Grace-dieu, Pilla, St. Clare, Lanthony, Bethkelert, Kaermerdin, Haverford, Glannauch, Ewenny, Ruthyn, Landaffe, Lancadant, Abergwylly, St. Davids.

FINIS.

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